Swale’s Historic Buildings

Swale is rich in history and historic buildings.

Historic England are responsible for maintaining a register of listed buildings, structures and sites.

The register includes over 1,400 listings within the Swale Distric, of which 320 are within

The two graphs below show a breakdown of the listings by parish and by period.Sittingbourne and neighbouring parishes.

This page includes a searchable database of the full Swale listings as published in December 2019.

Listings

The earliest listed structures are all churches with the majority dating from the 12th and 13th Century, an exception is St Margaret of Anioch in Lower Halstow which has parts dating from the 8th Century.

The listings include more than just churches and the old houses we see. Included are Mills, Walls, Stables, Tombs and Milestones.

Swale Heritage Strategy

The Swale Heritage Strategy is needed to help the Borough Council, key stakeholders and other interested parties protect and manage the historic environment in Swale Borough in a sustainable way, and on an informed basis. This includes setting an appropriate overall vision for our heritage, and setting out a vision and set of priorities that, as far as possible, align with the plans and aspirations of local communities such that this is a strategy that can be as inclusive and widely supported as possible.

Historic England Listings Database

This database includes all listings for Swale. The data has been extracted from Historic England.

The table includes the following information:

  • Reference ID
  • Listing Name
  • Period of earliest feature
  • Historic Category
  • Historic Grade
  • Description
  • Parish and Post Code
  • Date first listed
  • OS Grid Reference

to view the extra fields use the scroll bar at the bottom of the table.

Full listing information is available on Historic England.

Historic England IDListing NameDates FromHeritage CategoryGradeDetailsParishPost CodeDate first listedNational Grid Reference
1107173TOWER AT 076606C19TowerII3/90 Tower at 076606
Tower or eyecatcher. Mid C19. Red brick faced with knapped flint. Hexagonal plan. Two storeys on plinth with plat band and cornice to battlements. Doorway facing east with label hood. Window on second storey facing east with label hood. Interior: gutted, with remains of cast iron newel stair.
Dunkirk CPCT2 9LE21-May-86TR 07654 60603
1069142BOSSENDEN FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII5/95 Bossenden Farmhouse
Farmhouse. C17 and mid C19. Red brick, in English bond on rear wing, and plain tiled roof. C17 wing with C19 front elevation. Two storeys with corbelled eaves to hipped roof with stack to rear. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor and central half glazed and panelled door with flat hood on brackets. Rear wing: 2 storeys and half-hipped roof with half-hipped extensions to left and stacks to left and rear centre. Loft doors to left and in extension, and irregular fenestration of glazing bar sash and wood casement. Door of 6 raised and fielded panels to right and boarded doors to left. Single storey service wings attached to left and right, mainly C19, but with extensive evidence of C17 brickwork. Interior: fine moulded beams to interior of C17 wing. John Nichols Thom, alias Sir William Courtenay lodged here prior to the Battle of Bossenden Wood, May 31st 1838, culmination of the Courtenay Riots in which Courtenay (the New Messiah) and 8 followers were shot by the military.
Dunkirk CPCT2 9LG21-May-86TR 08829 59657
1372253BEACON HILL HOUSEC16Timber-framed houseII3/78 Beacon Hill House
House. C16. Timber framed, part exposed with plaster infill, part rendered and part weatherboarded. Plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys and continuous jetty, underbuilt to left. Hipped roof with gablets, gabled dormer to right and stacks to centre right and projecting at end right. Two wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor. Entry in porch on rear front. Outshot to right.
Badlesmere CPCT4 8HP24-Jan-67TR 01608 53531
1344212TANNERY HOUSEC19houseIIAn L-shaped building now divided into 2 houses. The oldest part is the South wing which is timber-framed with plaster infilling on the 1st floor of its West face. The remainder is weatherboarded. This consists of a centre and 2 wings with their 1st floor originally oversailing on the protruding ends of the floor Joists, but the ground floor of the North wing is now underbuilt. The West wing is probably C17. 2 storeys weatherboarded. Red brick chimney breast at its West end. Tiled roof to the whole. 3 casement windows facing East and 3 facing North.SittingbourneME10 1BH10-Sep-51TQ 89882 63886
1061034CHALKWELL HOUSEC19BuildingIIEarly C19. 2 storeys and semi-basement red brick. Slate roof. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Round-headed casement window in the centre of the 1st floor. Porch with Doric columns. Doorcase up 6 steps with rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels.SittingbourneME10 1BT13-Dec-74TQ 89767 63817
1344266TUNSTALL COURTC20HouseIISITTINGBOURNE TQ 86 SE GORE COURT ROAD 8/160 II Tunstall Court
Large house, latterly in use for educational purposes. Designed by Walter Brierley of York in 1914 in Neo-Queen Anne style. Built of red brick in English bond with brick dressings stone doorcase and hipped plain tiled roof with 2 massive panelled brick chimney-stacks. 2 storeys and attics, irregular fenestration. North of entrance front has 2 hipped end projections. Centre has 2 hipped dormers with leaded lights. Below are 5 windows including 3 casements, the ground floor ones with brick relieving arches and 2 tall 18 pane sashes with horns spanning both floors. Central stone doorcase with pediment and eaved architrave with date 1914 in centre. Wooden 3 panelled door with cross shape to lowest panel. Right hand side has plain 1/2 glazed door: left end projection has oval blank to first floor and 2 6-pane sashes curved top and bottom to ground floor. South or garden front has 2 projecting hipped gables linked by curved wooden portico with 2 Tuscan columns and 2 pilasters and elaborate balustrade forming balcony above. 5 windows. First floor windows mainly 12 pane sashes with horns and thick glazing bars and wooden jalousies apart from central French windows. End quoins and bond between floors. Ground floor windows are 15 pane sashes with horns and jalousies. To left and right of hipped projections there is one further 6 pane sash with cambered head. Section of brick walling to right hand side leads to integral. 1 storey brick garage with hipped tiled roof; 1 6 pane sash curved at top and bottom and wooden double doors.
SittingbourneME10 1GL11-Jul-87TQ 89974 62770
1344245WESTFIELDC18BuildingIINos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.SittingbourneME10 1JT13-Dec-74TQ 89847 63830
1067533SITTINGBOURNE ADULT STUDIES COLLEGEC19CollegeIISITTINGBOURNE RIDDLES ROAD TQ 86 SE 8/170
Sittingbourne Adult Studies College
GII School and integral headmaster’s house,in use as an adult studies establishment.Built in 1878 as Borden Grammar School.Stock brick with limestone dressings.Red clay plain tile roof with moulded ridge tiles and stone coped gable ends with finials.The tall brick shafts of the chimney-stacks have stone cornices with gargoyle-like features at the corners.Plan:Large school and integral headmaster’s house in Gothic style.The main central range contains a hall rising through two storeys with dormitories in the attic above which continue over the two storey range to the left (north west) and over the wing to the rear left.There are single storey school rooms projecting to the left at the front in staggered ranges.At the right hand(south east) end a cross-wing contains the headmaster’s house at the front and a service range at the back which encloses a small back yard.In circa mid to late C20 a single storey extension was built infilling the space between the two rear wings.Exterior:Asymmetrical south west front of three storeys,one and two storeys and attic and single storeyed bands of stone at window sill and impost levels.Former headmaster’s house on the right is a three storey projecting gable-ended wing with grouped lancet windows with cusped heads under hoodmoulds,the second floor window in the gable has plate tracery with trefoil piercing under a pointed arch.On the ground floor a single storey bay with five cusped lancets between a buttress on the right and an integral porch on the left,its trefoil-headed doorway having carved spandrels.Set back to the left of the headmaster’s house the main range of four:three:four bays,the gabled centre is advanced slightly and has large three and five-light mullion-transom windows rising through two storeys with cusp-headed lights and depressed two-centred arch hoodmoulds.In the gable a clock within a rose window (maker Gillett and Bland of Croydon 1878).To the left and right of the centre there are Gothic windows,one-light on the ground floor,two-light on the first floor and smaller attic windows above continuing across below the central gable.At left and right ends of main range gabled portals with double chamfered two-centred arches.The central gable is flanked by two tall stacks and gabled wooden ventilators in the roof.Projecting on the left,school rooms in single storey staggered ranges with gable ends facing the front each with a two-centred arch tympanum over the end window.The rear (north east) has projecting gable-ended wings to left and right and at centre large three and five-light windows and gabled ventilators in the roof above with a gabled bellcote above them at the centre.Between the two rear wings the space has been infilled with a C20 single storey extension.Interior:Plain institutional character with some alterations for its various uses since it ceased to be a school but the large central hall has two lateral fireplaces (curiously situated under the large windows)of Gothic design each with a frieze of quatrefoils containing initials WB (William Barrow) and cast-iron grate with a blue and white tile surround.In the dormitories the roof is partly exposed showing the trusses braced with iron tie-rods.History:The school was built in 1878 as Borden Grammar School for boys with money from the ‘Barrow Charity’.William Barrow died in 1707 leaving an estate of £12,000 to be distributed among the poor of Bowden,a village near Sittingbourne.In circa 1930 it was occupied by the Kent Farm Institute until the 1960s when it was used for teacher training and in 1979 it became the Sittingbourne Adult Studies College.
SittingbourneME10 1LF11-Jul-87TQ 89464 63004
1320356HALES COTTAGEC17HouseII5/57 Hales Cottage GV II
House. C17 and early C19. Red brick part in English bond with plain tiled roof. Originally square plan, possibly a dovecot with C19 extension. Two storeys and hipped roof with hipped extension and central C19 stack. One wood casement with shutters and glazed porch to left, and 2 wood casements on each floor on right return front.
Tunstall CPME10 1RL27-Nov-84TQ 89681 62009
1069355HALES HOUSEC17HouseII5/56 Hales House
House. Mid C17, restored C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with discontinuous plat band and cornice, with 2 gabled projections, C17 stack to left and C19 stack to right. Irregular fenestration of 5 large segment-headed wood casements on each floor. Plank and stud door to left in gabled porch of 2 storeys and attic. similar to Tunstall House, and indeed built for Sir Edward Hale’s grandson c.1640. (See B.O.E. Kent II 1983, 482)
Tunstall CPME10 1SR27-Aug-52TQ 89649 62016
1061039CRYALLS FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseIIAn L-shaped C18 house. 2 storeys and attics red brick and grey headers alternately. Roof has 3 hipped dormers. Parapet of red brick and grey headers. Moulded eaves cornice. 5 sashes with glazing bars missing. Doorcase with engaged columns, pediment, semi-circular fanlight and door of 8 fielded panels.Borden CPME10 1YF10-Sep-51TQ 89026 63363
103893144 AND 46, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIHand pump for drawing water. Mid C19. Cast iron. Five feet in height. Cylindrical post in 3 stages, the top moulded, fluted, and with fluted domed finial. Curved handle with banded finial.SittingbourneME10 2AD10-Sep-51TQ 90386 64512
1344217BACKS HOUSEC17HouseIIThis house is named after Humphrey Back who owned it about 1688. According to the Archaeologia Cantiana it originally had an open arcade of timber work on the ground floor. A timber-framed building, the timbering visible at the side with plaster infilling on the 1st floor and brick infilling below, but the front plastered and painted in imitation of timbering. The 1st floor oversails on a bressumer and brackets. 2 storeys. Tiled roof in 2 hips. 3 casement windows on 1st floor. Small bay below, a modern shop window and 3 original windows with depressed head, but plate glass inserted. Doorcase also with fanlight having depressed head.
Nos 52 to 76 (even) 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AD10-Sep-51TQ 90391 64530
137422054, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 storeys grey headers with red brick window dressings and quoins. Hipped slate roof. Stringcourse of grey headers. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Doorcase with fluted pilasters and door of 6 moulded panels.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), l04A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AD13-Dec-74TQ 90396 64547
106104863, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIA timber-framed house largely refronted in C18. 2 storeys. South portion all painted brick, the remainder painted brick on the ground floor only, above plastered with a moulded cornice between concealing a bressumer beneath. Tiled roof with dentilled eaves cornice. 4 sashes with glazing bars intact. The North and West fronts have overhanging gables with carved bargeboards and a carved bracket between them with 1 window in each.SittingbourneME10 2AE10-Sep-51TQ 90382 64580
106105556 AND 58, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIICl8, 2 storeys and attics red brick. Tiled roof with 1 hipped dormer. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to,104 (even), 104A and ll0 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AE13-Dec-74TQ 90397 64554
106105664 AND 66, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18 with mid Cl9 facade. 2 storeys and attics pebbledashed. Tiled roof in 2 hips to front elevation. 2 altered windows and later shop front. Grade II for group value.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and ll0 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AE13-Dec-74TQ 90398 64608
1344218HINDS HOUSEC18HouseIIHIGH STREET (East Side) MILTON REGIS No 60 (Hinds House) ) TO 9064 NW 1/72 10.9.51.
A large Cl8 house. 3 storeys and basement red brick. Parapet. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. 5 sashes with glazing bars intact. Doorcase up 4 steps with engaged Ionic columns, pediment, semi-circular tympanum and door of 6 moulded and fielded panels .
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and ll0 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AE10-Sep-51TQ 90400 64581
137422462, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIMid C19 facade to possible timber-framed building. 2 storeys and attics faced with curved tiles, Tiled roof set behind parapet. 2 paired casements. Later shop front. Grade II for group value.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AE13-Dec-74TQ 90398 64598
137437568 AND 70, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed houseIIOne building, timber-framed, refaced in C18 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressumer. 2 storeys. Ground floor painted brick above plastered. Tiled roof with parapet and dentilled cornice. 2 sash windows, 1 small bay on the ground floor of No 70 and a modern shop front to No 68. Doorcases with 4-centred heads, that in No 70 with carved spandrel and “Thomas 1585 Bradburi” and “Rev John 1801. Laugh” over them respectively.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 ( even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AE10-Sep-51TQ 90394 64617
10610435, CROWN ROADC18BuildingIICl8. 2 storeys red brick. Brick parapet. Long and short painted quoins and cornice. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact on the 1st floor and ogee-headed window in the centre. Doorcase with engaged columns, pediment, rectangular fanlight and door of 6 moulded and fielded panels.SittingbourneME10 2AL10-Sep-51TQ 90346 64554
103833380, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIAn C18 front to a probable timber-framed building. 2 storeys and attics painted brick. Tiled roof with modillion eaves cornice. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact on the lst floor and in one curved bay on the ground floor. Doorcase with rectangular tympanum. Modern shop front to the south of this.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90389 64653
103833990 AND 92, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 storeys brown brick, Renewed tiled roof with 2 brick chimney stacks. 4 sashes in all with glazing bars intact, No 90 has a slightly curved shopfront on the right hand side. Dentilled band between the ground and st floors of No 92 and 2 simple doorcases with rectangular fanlights.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90383 64684
1061017100 AND 102, HIGH STREETnaTimber-framed BuildingIIOne building, timber-framed with plaster infilling. This consists of a centre portion and 2 wings probably jettied on the 1st floor originally but now underbuilt. Tiled roof. Coved eaves o the centre portion supported on a bracket and curved braces, 2 tiers of 5 lights and metal framed mullions on 1st floor. One horizontally sliding sash window on the ground floor with glazing bars intact.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and ll0 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN10-Sep-51TQ 90388 64711
106105774 AND 76, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18 pair. 2 storeys stuccoed. Tiled roof. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact on the 1st floor only. No 74 has a modern shop front.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90392 64639
106105882-86, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIOne building, timber-framed, refaced in C18 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor. 2 storeys and attics plastered. Old tiled roof with 3 hipped dormers. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact on 1st floor. Modern shop fronts below.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90390 64661
106105994, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (East Side) MILTON REGIS No 94 TQ 9064 NW 1/136 II GV 2, C18. 2 storeys painted brick, Old tiled roof with 1 hipped dormer, 2 sashes with verticals only. Later shopfront.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90381 64695
134421972, HIGH STREETPre C18BuildingIIA probable timber-framed building refronted in Cl8. 2 storeys stuccoed. Steeply pitched tiled roof. Parapet. Dropped modillion cornice. 2 sashes with verticals only and modern shop front.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90390 64628
134422088, HIGH STREETnaTimber-framed HouseIIHIGH STREET (East Side) MILTON REGIS No 88 TQ 9064 NW 1/78 10.9.51. II GV 2, A timber-framed house, the ground floor stuccoed, the 1st floor overhanging on a bressumer, the timbering exposed with plaster infilling and rough pargetting. 2 storeys and attics. Tiled roof with 3 hipped dormers, Wooden modillion eaves cornice. 3 casement windows on the 1st floor, 2 bays below with glazing bars missing, 4-centred doorway with low rectangular fanlight over door lintel.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN10-Sep-51TQ 90385 64675
134423896 AND 98, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 storeys painted brick. Modern pantiled roof with 1 hipped dormer. 2 sashes with verticals only and modern shopfronts.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AN13-Dec-74TQ 90384 64698
1039107113 AND 115, HIGH STREETPre C18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (West Side) MILTON REGIS Nos 13 and 115 TQ 9064 NW 1/107 lO.9.51. II GV One building, timber-framed, refronted in C18. 2 storeys. Ground floor painted brick, above plastered, with cornice between in place of a bressumer. Tiled roof with heavy modillion eaves cornice. 5 sashes in wide architrave surrounds with glazing bars intact. Doorcase in moulded architrave surround with pediment over supported on brackets. Some trace of timbering visible in the North gable end,
Nos 113 to 117 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AP10-Sep-51TQ 90359 64770
1061018104A, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIA continuation of ‘Jay’s House’ to the north east. C18. 2 storeys colourwashed Half-hipped tiled roof with 1 hipped dormer, 1 bow window on ground floor and simple doorcase with rectangular fanlight. 3 light casement on side elevation.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AP13-Dec-74TQ 90398 64726
1061053117, HIGH STREETNATimber-framed HouseIIA timber-framed house with the left half of its 1st floor Jettied, the right half now underbuilt. Ground floor painted brick, above plastered. Steeply- pitched hipped tiled roof. 2 sash windows with glazing bars intact.
Nos 113 to 117 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AP10-Sep-51TQ 90356 64779
134421699 AND 99A, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 parallel ranges. 2 storeys and attics grey headers with red brick window dressings, quoins and architraves over the ground floor windows. Tiled roof with 2 hipped dormers 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Doorcase in moulded architrave surround with pediment over supported by brackets and door of 6 fielded panels,
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 7]A. 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A. 89 to 95 (Odd), 95A, 97, 97A. 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AP10-Sep-51TQ 90355 64733
1344240THE COURT HOUSEC15Timber-framed houseII*HIGH STREET (East Side) MILTON REGIS No 110 (The Court House) TQ 9064 NW 1/84 10.9.51. II* GV 2.
A timber-framed building Circa 1450, This was the Mediaeval Court Hall of Milton with 2 prison cells beneath. It was also used as a school when there were no courts. It has been restored and is now in use as a museum. 2 storeys timber-framed with plaster infill. The 1st floor is close-studded and has diagonal braces. Steeply pitched tiled roof. 3 casements with diamond panes on the street elevation and 1 original double lancet window on the right side elevation removed from a demolished house in Mill Street. The rear elevation has an overhang. . Curved braces. 4 restored casements on 1st floor and 2 restored wooden mullioned windows on the ground floor. AM. Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AP10-Sep-51TQ 90379 64734
1039122THE HIGH HOUSEC19BuildingIIOne building. An unusual timber-framed building. 3 storeys. Steeply pitched tiled roof. The ground floor consists of a modern shop front and an early Cl9 doorcase with thin pilasters, projecting cornice and rectangular tympanum. The lst floor oversails on a moulded bressumer and carved brackets with ornamental square timber- work between the latter. The right half formed by a continuous window of 2 tiers of 10 lights with wooden mullions and transom, the left half plastered with one sash window with glazing bars missing. Moulded cornice above the 1st floor. The left half of the 2nd floor is similar to the lst floor with glazing bars missing in the window. The right half has ornamental squares of timber-work and an oriel window of 2 tiers of 5 lights with wooden mullions and transom projecting on 3 carved brackets. On each side of this oriel window is one small 2-light fixed window.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd) 87A, 89 to 95 (odd),95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AR10-Sep-51TQ 90368 64646
106105079 and 81, High StreetPre C19Former InnIIOne building formerly the Red Lion Inn. A timber-framed building refaced in the early C19. Two storeys and attics stuccoed. Steep slate roof with one dormer. Two sashes with glazing bars intact on the first floor which also has a round panel in the centre. Modern shop fronts.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71(odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A, 89 to 95 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A,99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AR13-Dec-74TQ 90365 64650
106105183-87 AND 87A, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIITimber-framed houses, refronted with red brick in C18. 2 storeys painted brick. Tiled roofs. 4 sashes with glazing bars intact. Modern shop fronts, except to No 87.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A, 89 to 95 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2AR13-Dec-74TQ 90364 64663
1061054YEW TREE HOUSEC18BuildingIINos 113 to 117 (odd) form a group.SittingbourneME10 2BB13-Dec-74TQ 90308 64943
103909989, High Street (The White Hart Inn), and 91, High StreetPre C19Public HouseIIMILTON REGIS HIGH STREET (West side) No 89 (The White Hart Inn) and No 91
One building timber-framed rebuilt in early C19. Two storeys painted brick. Hipped tiled roof with wooden modillion eaves cornice. Five sashes with glazing bars intact. Modern shop window and public house front. Passage through the ground floor between these with the timber-framing visible in the south wall of this.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2BF13-Dec-74TQ 90359 64674
103910395 AND 95A, HIGH STREETPre C18BuildingIINo 95A is the back portion of No 95 but part of the same building. The street frontage of No 95 is L-shaped and the projection is of later date than the remainder. The original portion is timber-framed refronted in the C18, the projection probably early Cl9. 2 storeys and attics painted brick. Tiled roof with 2 hipped dormers. Wooden eaves cornice. 4 sashes with glazing bars intact. The original portion has a stringcourse and a doorcase with pilasters, projecting cornice, semi-circular fanlight and door of 6 moulded panels. The projection has a modern shop front and a curved window on the 1st floor. No 95A is reached by a left side passageway.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A 89 to 95 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2BF13-Dec-74TQ 90356 64704
106105297 AND 97A, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIICl8. 2 parallel ranges. 2 storeys and attics formerly grey headers with red brick window dressings, stringcourse and vertical strips, now of painted brick. Tiled roof. Wooden eaves cornice. 3 double sashes with glazing bars missing. Altered doorcase and modern shop front. The rear elevation has 2 triple sashes.
Nos 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A, 89 to 95 (odd), 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2BF30-Jan-73TQ 90347 64714
1344215THE THREE HATS INNPre C18Public HouseIIA timber-framed building, refronted in C18. 3 storeys painted brick, the ground floor stuccoed. Tiled roof in 2 half-hips. 2 sashes with glazing bars intact above ground floor. Modern public house front to ground floor.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 7l (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2BF13-Dec-74TQ 90356 64689
1344247QUINTON COTTAGEC18CottageIIA large timber-framed house, of which the main front faces North. 2 storeys and attics plastered. Tiled roof with pentice behind. 3 dormers. The 1st floor oversails on a bressumer and brackets. 5 casement windows. L-wing in brown brick added at the West end in the C19. Roof slopes to ground floor at rear.SittingbourneME10 2DD13-Dec-74TQ 89466 65225
105766071 AND 71A, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIEarly C19 building. 2 storeys white brick. Parapet and dentilled cornice. 2 sashes with glazing bars intact. Small 2-light curved window on ground floor with glazing bars intact. Doorcase in needed architrave surround with projecting cornice over and door of 6 moulded panels. .
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west. Nos 67 to 71. (odd). 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A, 89 to 95 (Odd). 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2DT13-Dec-74TQ 90368 64623
106104969, HIGH STREETNATimber-framed HouseIIA tall timber-framed house with plastered front, the 2nd floor oversailing on a moulded bressumer and brackets. 3 storeys. Tiled roof. 2 half-hipped gables. 2 modern sashes on 2nd floor. 2 small bays on the 1st floor with glazing bars missing. Modern shop front.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west Nos 67 to 71, odd 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd) 87A, 89 to 95 (odd) 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2DT10-Sep-51TQ 90366 64614
134421367, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 3 storeys red brick. Cornice and parapet. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact above ground floor. Modern shop front. Grade II for group value.
No 65 including the building ajoining on the south-west, Nos 67 to 71 (odd), 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd) 87A, 89 to 95 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2DT13-Dec-74TQ 90370 64606
134421473 AND 73A, HIGH STREETPre C18Former InnIIFormerly the George Inn. Cl8 front. 2 storeys painted brick. Tiled roof with wooden eaves cornice. 6 sashes without glazing bars but having architraves to ground floor windows. Modern shop front. To the south of the yard behind is an L-wing timber-framed but now fronted with weatherboarding. 2 storeys. Tiled roof. 3 gables with moulded bargeboards. 3 casement windows.
No 65 including the build adjoining on the south-west Nos 67 to 71 odd 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 odd 87A, 89 to 95 (odd) 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2DT10-Sep-51TQ 90365 64635
1345556NO 65, INCLUDING THE BUILDING (FORMER STABLES) ADJOINING ON THE SOUTH WESTC18Former InnIIFormerly the Crown Inn. C18 front to a probable timber-framed building. 2 storeys grey headers with red brick window dressings, quoins, stringcourse and vertical strips. Tiled roof with parapet and wooden modillion eaves cornice. 5 sashes with glazing bars missing. Doorcase in moulded architrave surround with pediment over supported on brackets and door of 6 fielded panels, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed. Modern shop front to the right of this. Adjoining on the south-west is a building that was formerly the stables of the inn. This is a fine 2 storey timber-framed building with red brick infilling on the 1st floor which oversails on the protruding ends of the floor joists. The ground floor is red brick with 6 pilasters. 3 original but unglazed windows on the 1st floor with wooden mullions and one C18 bay, with glazing bars intact, at the north-east end. Carriage archway beneath this with curved braces and double doors. Small modern shop window at the other end of the building.
No 65 including the building adjoining on the south-west Nos 67 to 71 (odd). 71A, 73, 73A, 75 to 87 (odd), 87A, 89 to 95 (odd), 95A, 97, 97A, 99 and 99A form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2DT10-Sep-51TQ 90364 64601
1344239JAY’S HOUSEC18HouseIIC18 exterior to possibly older house. 2 storeys and attics painted brick. Tiled roof with 2 hipped dormers. Modillion eaves cornice. 5 sashes with glazing bars intact. Two 2-light curved windows on the ground floor with cornices over. Doorcase with pilasters, pediment, low rectangular fanlight and door of 5 fielded panels.
Nos 52 to 76 (even), 80 to 104 (even), 104A and 110 form a group.
SittingbourneME10 2ED10-Sep-51TQ 90394 64716
1061036PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITYC14ChurchIC14. Restored by W L Grant in 1880. Flint-faced with stone quoins, window dressings and buttresses. Nave and chancel with south aisle to both and crenellated West tower with flint and stone buttresses. South porch. C15 windows. C14 roof. Piscina and sedilia. C14 octagonal font.SittingbourneME10 2HA10-Sep-51TQ 90888 65394
103136466, NORTH STREETC17BuildingIIA timber-framed house with plastered front and 1st floor oversailing on a bressumer. Hipped tiled roof. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Attached to the house at the West end is a cottage of 1 window bay, faced with roughcast and having a hipped tiled roof.SittingbourneME10 2HJ10-Sep-51TQ 90599 65246
1061040BRAMBLEFIELD FARMHOUSE (EXLUDING OUTBUILDINGS)NAFarmhouseIITwo storeys timber-framed. Ground floor brick, 1st floor cement rendered with some vertical beams visible. Hipped tiled roof. 3 windows now altered to metal framed casements. Right side doorcase with flat wooden weather hood. Left side later lean-to extension with slate roof. 2 outside brick chimney stacks to rear and 1 curved brace.SittingbourneME10 2SX27-Sep-73TQ 90241 66168
1393765CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITYC19ChurchII695/0/10005 DOVER STREET 27-APR-10 Church of the Holy Trinity
MATERIALS: The church is built of Kentish ragstone with limestone dressings and is roofed with slate.
PLAN: The plan consists of a nave with flanking aisles under their own gables, a chancel, N transept, N and S porches and a S tower.
EXTERIOR: It is a Gothic Revival church built in the style of the late 13th century which was extremely popular for church-building at the time it was erected. The defining features are the Geometrical style windows used extensively throughout the church. All the parts of the building are separately articulated as current ecclesiological taste dictated. The tower is very plain below and has paired, shafted lancets for belfry windows. The design of the tower and its parapet is such that a spire may have been intended to finish it off.
INTERIOR: The walls are plastered and whitened. Between the aisles and nave there are four-bay arcades with octagonal piers, moulded capitals and bases and arches with roll-moulding on the soffits. The chancel arch is double chamfered. Over the nave is a hammerbeam roof with slender timber members and intermediate arch-braced traces. The chancel has a simple close-coupled roof with main trusses with a collar. The aisles have tie-beam roofs with arch braces to a collar. There is a curious treatment at the first pier from the E which consists of two responds of unequal height mounted back-to-back. This type of feature might be expected in a medieval church where it would indicate a change of design between two building phases. Unlikely as it might seem, that is probably what has happened here between the two building campaigns of the 1860s and 1870s and is perhaps an example of a deliberate attempt to introduce a feature which suggests organic development of a kind that might be found in a medieval church.
FIXTURES: Most of the fixtures are original to the Victorian church. The font has an octagonal bowl with nodding ogee arches and stiff-leaf decoration. It has a pyramidal cover with blind tracery panels and which is mounted on a counter-weighted system. The plain stone tub pulpit has a moulded cornice, a band of text and a thick octagonal stem. The reredos has blind tracery stone arches on marble shafts with good painted panels of prophets etc (date and artist unknown). There is a series of fine stalls with open traceried fronts and poppy-head ends. The pews are of pine and have simple shaped ends of the rounded shoulder type and many of them still retain their Victorian numbering. Those to the W of the N and S entrances were cleared away in 2009 to create a circulation space with refreshment facilities etc. Stained glass includes a N chapel E window of 1901 signed by T F Curtis, Ward and Hughes: the E window is by Ward and Hughes, 1896. The best features of the Victorian work are the reredos with rather good paintings of Old Testament prophets etc and the choir stalls which have elegant pierced frontals and rather attenuated poppyhead bench ends.
HISTORY: The church was built to meet the need for increased Anglican church accommodation in Sittingbourne in mid-Victorian times. Although planned as a whole, it was built in two main phases as was often the case in the 19th century due to constraints on funding. The first parts built were the nave and aisles in 1867 for which the architect was the London-based Richard Charles Hussey (1806-87). Holy Trinity church was designed by Richard Charles Hussey (1806-87). He was for a time in partnership with Thomas Rickman who is famed for his categorisation of the medieval styles of architecture which is still used today. The Buildings of England CD-ROM lists just over 50 works by him, almost exclusively churches or parsonages. They cover a fairly wide geographical spread from Kent through to the Midlands. Their date range is from 1839 to 1870 so it seems likely that he spent the last 17 years of his life in retirement which is why the second phase of the work at Holy Trinity passed to Joseph Clarke who was extremely busy as a church-builder in Kent. The need to complete the building was driven by further population expansion in the area. In the application for a grant from the Incorporated Church Building Society in 1872 it was noted that `At the time the [1871] Census was taken a great depression in the Brick trade reduced the population of this newly formed parish from 3000 to 2553. It has again nearly reached the former number, and there is every prospect of a further increase in population. The population with but a few exceptions consists of the very poor’. Slight changes seem to have taken place in the design between the two phases. The architect for the second phase was Joseph Clarke (1819 or 20-1888), another London-based man whose practice was very largely concerned with church-building and restoration. His known works date from the middle of the 1840s until the time of his death. He was diocesan surveyor to Canterbury and Rochester and, from 1877, the newly-created diocese of St Albans. These posts helped bring in numerous commissions in these three dioceses but he also gained jobs over a much wider geographical area and examples of his work can be found in most parts of England. He was consultant architect to the Charity Commissioners.
SOURCES Incorporated Church Building Society papers, Lambeth Palace Library, file 7345. Homan, Roger, The Victorian Churches of Kent (1984) p 89. Newman,John, The Buildings of England: North East and East Kent, 3rd ed. (1983), p 462.
DODDINGTON AND NEWNHAM WAR MEMORIAL
SittingbourneME10 3EF27-Apr-10TQ 90347 63816
1061042BAYFORD COURTPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIA timber-framed house with plastered front. 2 storeys. Tiled roof, 2-storied porch with the 1st floor Jettied on brackets and hipped roof over. Stringcourse. 5 windows in all. 2 sash windows with glazing bars intact. The other windows are casements windows or horizontally-sliding sashes, C18 addition behind,SittingbourneME10 3JQ10-Sep-51TQ 91150 63928
1061037MURSTON HOUSEC19BuildingIIMid C19. 3 storeys, the ground and 1st floors are of red brick but a 2nd storey in yellow brick has been added. Hipped slate roof. 3 sashes. These are 3-light with cambered heads to the lower floors. Tuscan porch. Semi-circular fanlight and 6 panelled door.SittingbourneME10 3NN13-Dec-74TQ 91888 63835
1061041CHURCH OF ALL SAINTSC12ChurchIIC12. Rebuilt 1873-4. Architect William Burges. Early Gothic style built of knapped flints with stone dressings. Tiled roof. 4 bay nave and north aisle, lower tower at north. Large plate tracery rose window in west gable with West door beneath under a lean-to porch, North aisle gabled and lit by plate-tracery windows. Apsed chancel with lancets. Interior has a C12 North arcade with round piers, Tie beam roof to nave. Boarded wagon roof to chancel. Not in ecclesiastical use.SittingbourneME10 3RU13-Dec-74TQ 91840 63970
1344246EAST HALLPre C19Timber-framed houseIIC18. 2 storeys painted brick, Half-hipped tiled roof with sprocket eaves cornice. 5 sashes with cambered head linings having glazing bars intact. C19 gabled porch. Doorcase in moulded architrave surround with door of 6 fielded panels. This probably once had a pediment, now blocked by the porch.SittingbourneME10 3TJ10-Sep-51TQ 92490 64271
1031356MERES COURT, WITH COTTAGE ATTACHEDNATimber-framed HouseIIBier house or mortuary chapel. Mid C19. Flint and dressed stone with plain tiled roof. One storey on plinth with kneelered parapet gable. Re-used medieval slit light in gable over plank and stud door in arched surround. The rear incorporates a contemporary urinal and earth closet under a flat roof. Included for rarity of type.SittingbourneME10 3TL10-Sep-51TQ 92391 64608
103181593, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIINos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.SittingbourneME10 4AJ13-Dec-74TQ 90606 63653
106102127 AND 27A, HIGH STREETPre C18Timber-framed BuildingIIA probable timber-framed building refronted in the C18. 2 storeys built of alternate strips of red and grey brick. Hipped modern tiled roof. 5 sashes with glazing bars intact. 2 modern shop fronts and left side carriage entrance. Grade II for group value.
Nos 25 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AP13-Dec-74TQ 90881 63594
106102229 AND 29A, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIEarly Cl9. 2 storeys stuccoed. Parapet and modillion cornice. 5 sashes with some glazing bars intact. Modern shop front. Grade II for group value.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AP13-Dec-74TQ 90866 63600
106102331 AND 33, HIGH STREETPre C18Former InnIIFormerly part of the George Inn. A timber-framed building refronted with red brick about 1730. 2 storeys. Hipped tiled roof. 6 sashes and 1 window space with some glazing bars intact on the 1st floor. Modern shop fronts with a carriage archway between these. The timber framing of the building is visible there and at the back of the building of which part of the 1st floor is jettied.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AP13-Dec-74TQ 90859 63600
106102435-39, HIGH STREETPre C18Former InnIIFormerly part of the George Inn. A tall timber-framed building refronted with red brick in the early C18. 3 storeys red brick and grey headers alternately. Hipped tiled roof with wooden modillion eaves cornice. Brick stringcourse above 1st floor. 9 sashes with glazing bars intact above ground floor. Modern shop fronts but that to No 39 incorporates 3 older engaged Ionic columns. Carriage archway at the west end with ceiling beams visible overhead.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AP10-Sep-51TQ 90843 63602
1061025THE GEORGE HOTELC16Former InnIIThe George Inn was a flourishing concern by 1562. This part is a timber-framed building, refaced with stucco about 1786 and then made into the taproom of the George Hotel. 2 storeys and attics, Steeply pitched tiled roof having 3 gabled dormers. Cornice above ground floor concealing original bressumer. 5 sashes with glazing bars intact on the 1st floor only. The ground floor has 3 C19 3-light sashes without glazing bars and 2 simple doorcases with rectangular fanlights.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AP10-Sep-51TQ 90818 63605
1031810BRENCHLEY HOUSEC19HouseIIOne house built by Edward Brenchley about 1800. 3 storeys and basement red brick. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. 3 windows, consisting of 2 flattened bays through all floors with a Venetian window between these on the 1st floor. Glazing bars intact. Good porch with fluted Ionic columns, open pediment, semi-circular fanlight, panelled reveals and door of 6 fielded panels.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AU10-Sep-51TQ 90688 63638
106102979 AND 81, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIOne building. Early C19. 3 storeys red brick. Slate roof with eaves cornice. 5 sashes with most glazing bars intact above ground floor. Porch with 2 fluted Doric columns and 2 pilasters, rectangular fanlight and double doors of 6 moulded panels. No 79 has a modern shop front to the east of the doorway.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81,(odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AU13-Dec-74TQ 90676 63639
103182142, 44 AND 44A, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIThis block was built in 1708 by Robert Jeffs and originally called Rose Place. Later in the century it became the Rose Inn which was called in Hasted’s “History of Kent” “the most superb of any [inn] throughout the kingdom and the entertainment afforded in it equally so”. The Duchess of Kent and Princess Victoria stayed there in 1825, after which it was renamed the Royal Victoria Hotel. It ceased to be a hotel after the railway had undermined the importance of Sittingbourne as a coaching station on the Dover Road. 3 storeys brown brick with red brick window dressings. Tiled roof and wooden modillion cornice with consoles below some of the modillions, 6 sashes with most glazing bars intact above the ground floor. Stone plaque between the 1st and 2nd floor with the model of a red rose and the letters “RI”. and the date 1708. Modern shop fronts.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW13-Dec-74TQ 90760 63645
103192243, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 3 storeys red brick. Parapet with stone coping and moulded wooden cornice with enriched frieze below. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Curved 3-light window on ground floor. Doorcase with engaged Ionic columns, open pediment, semi-circular fanlight, panelled reveals and 6 panelled door.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81. (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW10-Sep-51TQ 90810 63607
106102645, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 3 storeys red brick. Parapet. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact above the ground floor. Modern shop front. Round-headed doorcase with semi-circular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW13-Dec-74TQ 90804 63610
106102759 AND 61, HIGH STREETC18HouseIIOne large C18 house. 3 storeys red brick. Brick parapet and moulded wooden cornice. 5 sashes. The centre window bay projects slightly and contains a tripartite window with an elliptical tympanum containing fan ornamentation on the 1st floor. The whole of the ground floor has been altered to form a modern shop front.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81, (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW10-Sep-51TQ 90754 63624
134424163 AND 65, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) SITTINGBOURNE Nos 63 and 65 TQ 9063 NE 2/141 10.9.73. II GV 2.
Mid C19 built in the Georgian idiom. 3 storeys red brick. No 63 has been painted. 3 sashes in all with most glazing bars intact. Modern shop fronts. Grade II for group value.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW10-Sep-73TQ 90748 63627
135268349 AND 51, HIGH STREETC18HouseII*HIGH STREET (South Side) SITTINGBOURNE Nos 49 and 51 TQ 9063 NE 2/17 10.9.51.
One building. No 49 is the cellars beneath the house. A Regency front to a probable C18 house. 2 storeys and attics stuccoed. Tiled roof with parapet. 2 hipped dormers. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. 2 of these are elliptical bows through both floors with tripartite windows and elliptical tympana over them containing fan Ornamentation. Porch at the head of 5 steps having fluted Doric columns and enriched frieze supporting lst floor cast iron balcony. Left side doorcase having 6 fielded panels up 7 steps with a handrail.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81,(odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AW10-Sep-51TQ 90784 63614
106101923, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIILate C18 to early C19. 2 storeys red brick. Steeply pitched tiled roof. Stone coping. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact set in arcading.
[Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AY13-Dec-74TQ 90903 63592
106102025, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 storeys and attics grey headers with red brick window dressings and quoins. Modern tiled roof and wooden modillion eaves cornice. 4 sashes with glazing bars missing. Late Cl9 shop front. Grade II for group value.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4AY13-Dec-74TQ 90889 63596
106104410-14, EAST STREETPre C19Timber-framed HouseIIA timber-framed building refronted. 2 storeys painted brick. Steeply pitched tiled roof with one brick chimney stack. 3 sashes with verticals only. C19 shop front.SittingbourneME10 4BG13-Dec-74TQ 91031 63564
1061046151, EAST STREETPre C19BuildingIIA timber-framed building refronted in the C19. 2 storeys. Stock brick. The side elevation is weatherboarded. Steeply pitched tiled roof. 3 altered windows and C19 shop front. Exposed timber-framing to rear elevation. The left side elevation has 2 double sashes.SittingbourneME10 4BT27-Sep-73TQ 91401 63496
1393109SPICER HOMESC20Former AlmshouseII366/0/10006 BELL ROAD 01-APR-09 SITTINGBOURNE Spicer Homes
Former almshouses, now houses. Built in 1930, the architect John P Bishop FRIBA and the builders John P Bishop and Sons. Built in a Neo-Vernacular C17 style with Arts and Crafts influences.
MATERIALS: Good quality narrow, random bond, local brickwork with tumbling-in to the gables, tile-on-edge decoration to the plinth, and plain tiled roofs with brick chimneystacks with moulded tops and some hipped dormers. Original metal-framed casement windows throughout with original fastenings in brick surrounds, some with relieving arches, with sloping cills.
PLAN: An L-shaped plan with north and east ranges linked to a former water tower in the north east corner. Originally there were thirteen single storey almshouses and a warden’s house of two storeys at the westernmost part of the north range, which has since become another of the homes. The former warden’s house is larger and modified butterfly plan. The almshouses are of three distinct types, Nos 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11and 14 having projecting gables with entrances in the sides, Nos 8, 9, 12 and 13 having recessed loggias and Nos 2 and 5 plain fronts. Each almshouse consists of a bedroom, living room and kitchen.
EXTERIOR: No. 1, originally the warden’s house, has gables with kneelers facing west and south and between them. facing south-west. a central full-height splayed bay. Under the first floor window is a large plaque inscribed “SPICER HOMES FOUNDED 1930”. Below is a doorcase with flatleaded weather-hood with decorative iron ties connecting the hood and the wall. There is a two-light casement on the ground floor on each side of the doorcase. The west gable has a three-light casement to the first floor and a five-light canted bay with hipped tiled roof to the ground floor. The south gable has a four-light casement to the first floor and a three- light casement below. The principal front of the north range of almshouses faces south and Nos 2-6 have eight tripartite caseeemnt windows, one window to Nos 3, 4 and 6 in a projecting gable with kneelers, Nos 3 and 4 having a paired gable with a metal plaque with the amalgamated initials S and H, date 1930 and they have a more elaborate ribbed brick chimneystack. Beneath the plaque is a round-headed arch with keystone leading to the rear of the properties. Nos 2 and 5 have a hipped dormer and doorcase beneath it. Nos 3, 4 and 6 have entrances at the sides of the gables. Between Nos 6 and 7 is a splayed entrance with a keystone with impost blocks and plaque inscribed “THESE HOMES WERE ERECTED AS A MEMORIAL TO THE LATE JULIA SPICER, FORMERLY OF THIS TOWN, OUT OF MONEYS FORMING PART OF HER ESTATE, AND IN ACCORDANCE WITH HER WISHES” and has the names of the two trustees, Walter R Elgar and F Austen Bensted. Behind is the corner two-storey square brick building with a pyramidal roof surmounted by decorative metal weathervane and plank door, which is set diagonally and contained the water tank on the first floor and storage below. The eastern range, comprising Nos 7-14 incorporates four gables to Nos 7, 10, 11 and 14 of which Nos 10 and 11 are paired, like Nos 3 and 4. Nos 8 and 9 and 12 and 13 incorporate a recessed loggia with four brick piers. A further plaque in the gable of No. 14 records the architect John P Bishop, the surveyor W Shapland Cowper and the builder Geo. Bowes and sons. The rear sides of the two ranges are of similar character to the front but plainer with casement windows and rear doors.
INTERIOR: The former warden’s house retains the original dogleg staircase with stick balusters and the dining room retains the original wooden fireplace. There is a timber panelled internal porch. The other properties are likely to retain six-panelled doors, wooden fireplaces and low level built-in cupboards to the living room and built-in cupboards with double doors to the bedrooms. Originally the attics above the individual almshouses were linked but partitions were later inserted between the individual properties for fire regulations.
HISTORY: The almshouses were erected in 1930 as a memorial to Mrs Julia Spicer out of a bequest from her estate. They first appear on the Ordnance Survey map of 1938 and the footprint remains unaltered. At a later date they were acquired first by the local council and then by a housing association.
SittingbourneME10 4EA01-Apr-09TQ 90649 62932
1055793CEMETERY CHAPELC19ChapelIIErected 1860. Built of ashlar blocks with stone dressings. This consists of 2 Mortuary Chapels connected by a passageway with a carriage arch through the centre. 1 storey. Tiled roof with bands of fishscale tiles. Windows are single or double lancets. Buttresses. Rose windows to each side of the chapels. The front elevation has a foliated window to the chapel and 2 lancets on each side of the passage. Central pseudo-bellcote with date stone.
Nos 46 to 50 (even). Wall to Cemetery and Cemetery chapel form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4EB13-Dec-74TQ 90572 63057
1061079WALL TO CEMETERYC19WallIICirca 1860. Wall about 3 ft high of ashlar blocks. Stone coping with a row of bricks set edgeways on just beneath. Square stone piers and 3 stone gatepiers with conical caps.
Nos 46 to 50 (even). Wall to Cemetery and Cemetery Chapel form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4EB13-Dec-74TQ 90608 63050
136659746, BELL ROADC19LodgeIIBELL ROAD (West Side) SITTINGBOURNE
A lodge to the municipal cemetery. Circa 1860. 1½ storeys of ashlar blocks. Tiled roof with some bands of fishscale tiles. 2 windows on the front elevation. The 1st floor has a double pointed window in the right side gable and a hipped dormer with 1 pointed window. The ground floor has a bay window on the right hand side and a double sash window set in a stone cambered architrave on the left hand side. The left side elevation has a double window on the 1st floor and a ground floor bay.
Nos 46 to 50 (even). Wall to cemetery and Cemetery Chapel form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4EB13-Dec-74TQ 90596 63032
134419248 AND 50, BELL ROADC19BuildingIIA mid Cl9 pair. 3 storeys and basement stock brick, though the left hand side of No 50 is cemented. Hipped slate roof. 2 sashes each. Stringcourse between 2nd and 3rd floor. 3 3-light bays on the ground floor. The lst floor sashes have moulded architraves. Doorcases set in porticos on the side elevation.
Nos 46 to 50 (even). Wall to cemetery and Cemetery chapel form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4ED13-Dec-74TQ 90570 62971
1031795THE ROSE INNC19Public HouseIIEarly C19. 3 storeys red brick. Old tiled roof. 2 sashes set in moulded architraves with verticals only. C19 pub front with 4 pilasters, 2 doorcases with rectangular fanlights and windows with Ipswich glazing. Grade II for group value.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB12-Oct-73TQ 90732 63652
103180058, HIGH STREETPre C18BuildingIISITTINGBOURNE HIGH STREET (North Side) No 58
10.9.51 GV II This building, with Nos 60 and 62 adjoining, formed the front of the Red Lion Inn which was originally the principal hotel of Sittingbourne until it was superseded by the Rose Inn. The front dates from the Cl8. 2 storeys and attics red brick. Tiled roof and 1 C19 gabled dormer. Cornice and panelled parapet on which there is a plaster figure of a couchant lion. 4 sashes with glazing bars missing. Modern public house front on the ground floor and carriage arch through the building to the west of it. Behind the street front and at right angles to it is a long low timber-framed building. The ground floor has been rebuilt in painted brick. The lst floor is plastered and overhangs on a bressumer. Tiled roof. Sash windows, some with glazing bars intact, including a curved bay of 3 round-headed windows at the south end of the ground floor with cornice over. 2 storeys, 6 windows facing west. There has been an inn on this site for 500 years. In 1415, Henry V was entertained here on his return from Agincourt. Other famous customers include Cardinal Wolsey and Henry V.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB10-Sep-51TQ 90717 63656
106102869, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIILate C18 to early C19. 2 storeys and attics. Faced with red brick and grey headers with long and short painted quoins and a wooden modillion eaves cornice. 2 hipped dormers. 3 sashes. Glazing bars intact. Modern shop front.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90713 63634
106103146 AND 48, HIGH STREETC20BuildingIIA modern replica of part of the Rose Inn and listed for group value only. Early C20. 3 storeys brown brick with red brick dressings. Tiled roof with wooden modillion eaves cornice with console brackets. 4 sashes with glazing bars. Modern shop front.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90745 63649
106103256, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIEarly Cl9. 3 storeys red brick. Old tiled roof. Parapet, 3. altered window and later shop front.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90721 63655
106103360 AND 62, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIThis is a continuation of the facade of No. 58 which was originally part of the Red Lion Inn. It was converted into houses about 1835. C18. Two storeys and attics, red brick. Tiled roof. Cornice and panelled parapet. Eight sashes with glazing bars missing. No. 60 has a modern bank front and No. 62 has a modern shop front.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90705 63660
134424271 AND 73, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIILate C18 to early C19. 2 storeys and attics. No 71 is stuccoed. No 73 is faced with painted brick on the ground floor and is stuccoed above with the trace of a bressumer of a timber-framed building between. 3 sashes in all, 1 of which is 3-light. Round-headed doorcase with semi-circular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels. No 71 has a modern shop front. No 73 has a right side round-headed doorcase with semi-circular fanlight having glazing bars intact and a 6 fielded panelled door.
Nos 25 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90703 63630
134424452 AND 54, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIEarly C19. 3 storeys red brick. Tiled roof. Parapet with stone coping. 2 sashes in all with cambered wooden architrave. Later shop front. Grade II for group value.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB13-Dec-74TQ 90724 63654
1352688THE BULL HOTELC18HotelIIIn course of restoration at time of survey. C18. 2 storeys painted brick. Eaves cornice. 5 sashes and 2 window spaces with glazing bars intact. C19 hood over the doorway.
Nos 23 to 45 (odd) and 49 to 81 (odd) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PB14-Sep-70TQ 90723 63634
134424332, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIC18. 2 storeys and attics. Grey headers and red brick in vertical strips. Hipped tiled roof and parapet. 3 windows and 1 gabled dormer facing the south, 4 windows facing west. Glazing bars missing. Modern shop front. The side elevation has a weatherboarded 1/2 hipped gable and 1 cambered casement and a sliding sash.
Nos 30 to 62 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4PD13-Dec-74TQ 90811 63633
1061030CHURCH OF ST MICHAELC11ChurchII*Church of C11 origins with a major building campaign in the C13, and C14. Further works, including the completion of the west tower, in the C15. Subsequent alterations and additions, principally the restoration by George Dance Senior after a serious fire in 1762 and Victorian restorations by Slater and Carpenter between 1859 and 1887.
MATERIALS: Principally Kentish ragstone and knapped flint with pitched tiled roofs.
PLAN: Aisled nave with south transept; west tower; south porch; chancel built over a crypt with a north chapel/vestry and south chapel.
EXTERIOR: Principal elevation to the south onto the High Street: Handsome west tower begun in the late C13 and completed in the C15. A robust structure of four storeys, stepped angle-buttresses, external semi-circular stair tower to the south rising to a polygonal turret above the roof parapet. South aisle also with a parapet and stepped angled and intermediate buttresses, of late C13 or early C14 date. Main entrance through south porch: flat roof with parapet, diagonal buttresses, vaulted roof to interior and anthropomorphic stops to arched entrance. Transept has very large Perpendicular south window. Flint work here is of a different form being large, roughly knapped flints. South chapel is of circa 1300 with Perpendicular alterations. Canopied niche on the south-east buttress is recorded as housing a statue of St Mary (no longer in situ). Large east windows to south chapel and chancel. Window tracery in the main reinstated during Victorian restorations.
INTERIOR: East half of the chancel appears the oldest fabric: two blind lancets (originally external) in north wall set under two large blank arches. Two similar but wider C13 arches on the south side, later pierced to provide access to the south chapel and restored in C19. Western arches on north side of chancel are late C13. Crypt beneath chancel with quadripartite rib-vault with chamfered ribs. West wall blocking prevents access to remainder. South chapel and its original south window date it to circa 1300. Impressive Perpendicular window to transept. Nave arcades of three wide arches on alternating octagonal and round piers. Corbels with a mixture of finely carved heads and cruder examples of anthropomorphic and zoomorphic forms at the junction of the nave and the south transept/aisle. Barrel vaulted nave roof divided into panels by exposed ribs. Boarded aisle roofs divided into panels by ribs; also exposed timbers in chancel roof. Nave, chancel and aisle roofs were all constructed in late C18 restoration after fire destroyed the medieval roofs but have undoubtedly been restored since. West tower has ringing and bell chambers.
FIXTURES AND FITTINGS: Reredos of 1860 by Slater with central panel decorated with an embossed Greek cross flanked by paired stone recesses with slender columns and trefoil heads framing images of angels on a gilded ground. Good east window of 1860 by Clayton & Bell depicting the Last Supper. Organ by William Hill & Son, London, installed in 1881 in north of chancel and reconstructed and enlarged in 1928. Replaced an organ of 1822 in the west gallery (which no longer survives). Monument in north aisle of reclining shrouded female with swaddled baby under a segmental recess, much worn but appears early or mid C15. Good quality octagonal font, probably early C15, decorated with coats of arms. Other glass: one north window designed by Kent ecclesiologist, Dr Grayling, incorporating old glass. South aisle west window of 1844 by Willement. Other glass by Clayton and Bell and Willement. First World War and Second World War Memorial Windows and window commemorating the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in south transept. Peal of eight bells: six dating to 1687, a further late C17 bell was recast in the late C19 and remainder are late C19.
ANCILLARY FEATURES: Churchyard wall and gate piers, also in knapped flint with stone dressings. Gate piers rise from plinths, are square in section and have pyramidal caps with gables on each face.
HISTORY: There was a church on this site from the C11 but there is no architectural evidence which can be confidently ascribed to this date although it is clear that elements of the chancel exhibit the earliest surviving fabric. It is in the C13 that the present St Michael’s truly begins to take form and was largely complete by the late C14 with the completion of the tower attributable to the C15. The building was gutted by fire in July 1762, caused during repairs to the lead roof which was destroyed leaving only the bare walls of the church although the tower escaped the destruction. The restoration was overseen by the architect George Dacre Senior (who took out most of the tracery) and was completed in 1767. The south transept and Lady Chapel were used as a school in the early C19 and were partitioned off from the main church with access through the now blocked round-headed door in the west wall. The church was also subject to Victorian restoration by Slater and Carpenter between 1859 and 1887. The bells were re-hung in a new frame in 1896. C20 alterations include the addition of a First World War memorial window in the south transept in 1920. The building was extensively restored in the 1960s. St Michael’s is a sister church to St Mary’s Sittingbourne which is of early C20 date. SOURCES: Newman, J, The Buildings of England: North East and East Kent, pp. 461-2 (1969) The Organ. The Parish Church of St Michael the Archangel, Sittingbourne. Church leaflet St Michael. The Parish Church of Sittingbourne for nearly 1000 years. Draft church guide, 2003. Church website at http://www.saintsinsittingbourne.org.uk/index.php
REASON FOR DESIGNATION DECISION St Michael’s Church Sittingbourne is listed at Grade II* for the following principal reasons: * The significant extent of surviving medieval fabric * Architectural details of interest including: carved stone heads to the exterior and interior, a C15 font and tomb, and good stained glass (particularly the Victorian east window of the Last Supper and a memorial window to the First World War in the south transept).
SittingbourneME10 4PG10-Sep-51TQ 90934 63615
1031372CHILTON MANORC18HouseIICottage row. C17 and C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and rendered upper storey, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic, roof hipped to right, with stack to centre right. Five wooden casements on first floor, and 3 on ground floor and boarded half-door to left, and half-glazed door to centre. Projecting gable to left with pulley over loft doors. Brick carthouse added at end left with dogtooth cornice to parapet, and cart doors.SittingbourneME10 4QF13-Dec-74TQ 91084 62898
106108062, BELL ROADC19BuildingIINos 46 to 50 (even). Wall to Cemetery and Cemetery Chapel form a group.SittingbourneME10 4QJ13-Dec-74TQ 90506 62757
1061038FULSTON MANOR FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIIA small portion at the back is probably C17 but the front is C18. 2 storeys red brick. Upped tiled roof with brick stack. 4 sashes with glazing bars intact and 1 3-light bay on the right side of the ground floor.SittingbourneME10 4QW10-Sep-51TQ 90657 62646
1061045124, EAST STREETC19BuildingIIEarly C19 2 storeys stuccoed. Slate roof. Parapet with moulded cornice. 2 sashes and 1 blank with glazing bars intact. Central doorcase with flat weather- hood, pilasters and 6 panelled door.
Nos 120 to 124 (even) form a group.
SittingbourneME10 4RX13-Dec-74TQ 91443 63457
1025893QUINTON FARMHOUSEC13FarmhouseIIQUINTON ROAD (North West Side) MILTON REGIS Quinton Farmhouse
An Cl8 front to a medieval timber-framed house reputed to date from the Cl3. 2 storeys faced with red brick. 3 sashes with glazing bars intact. Steeply pitched nipped tiled roof sloping to ground floor at rear.
SittingbourneME10 5AZ13-Dec-74TQ 89372 65295
12583335, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 5 TQ 9072 SE 1/44
C18. 2 storeys painted brick, part of the 1st storey being stuccoed. Renewed pantiled roof with 1 dormer. Stringcourse. 1 sash with verticals only on 1st floor and with glazing bars intact to ground floor. Single right side. C19 doorcase with rectangular fanlight.
Queenborough CPME11 5AB30-Jun-78TQ 90688 72212
1258384THE CASTLE INNC18Public HouseIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 7 (The Castle Inn) TQ 9072 SE 1/45
C18. 2 storeys painted brick. The 1st floor has applied timber-framing and is pebbledashed in between. Tiled roof with 2 dormers. Stone coping. 1st floor has 2 later 3-light bays but similar smaller bay on the ground floor. Central doorcase. The rear elevation is weatherboarded.
Queenborough CPME11 5AB30-Jun-78TQ 90695 72213
12583889, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 9 TQ 9072 SE 1/46
C18. 2 storeys painted brick, half-hipped old tiled roof. Coping. 1 sash with verticals only. Later C19 shopfront.
Queenborough CPME11 5AB30-Jun-78TQ 90702 72215
125841620, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough No 20 TQ 9072 SE 1/58 19.10.51
Early C18. 2 storeys and attics, painted brick. Half-hipped tiled roof with 2 tiled hipped dormers. Moulded eaves cornice. 1st floor has 3 sashes with top half of the sashes with original glazing bars the lower half without. The ground floor has 3 sashes with verticals only. Doorcase with fluted pilasters and panelled reveals. Fine fluted moulding to architrave. Dentils and plain lintel board. Brick plinth.
Queenborough CPME11 5AB19-Oct-51TQ 90728 72244
125841822, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough No 22 TQ 9072 SE 1/59 19.10.51.
Early C18 house. 2 storeys and attics painted brick with plastered plinth. Hipped tiled roof with 2 hipped tiled dormers. Fine moulded projecting eaves cornice. Stringcourse. Ground floor central doorcase with moulded pilasters and plain brackets supporting lintel board. 2 later bar fronts. 1st floor has 3 sash windows in exposed frames with upper halves having glazing bars intact. Ground floor has 2 large modern segmental-arched windows on either side of the doorcase with plaster surrounds and centre voussoirs. Rear elevation has 2 half-hipped weatherboarded gables.
Queenborough CPME11 5AB19-Oct-51TQ 90737 72246
1243155SWALE HOUSEC18HouseIIWEST STREET (West Side) Queenborough Swale House TQ 9072 SE 1/121
Good late C18 to early C19 house facing the sea. 2 parallel ranges. 3 storeys red brick with one storey flanking wings on either side (the right side wing now has a further storey added to it). Stringcourse. Parapet and concealed tiled roof. 2nd floor has 2 sashes in recessed frames and 1 blank. lst floor has 3 sash windows in recessed frames. Ground floor has 4 round-headed sash windows. Central doorcase and projecting porch with Tuscan columns. Fanlight with circular tracery. Moulded pilasters. 6 fielded panelled door. Interior modernized.
Queenborough CPME11 5AD30-Jun-78TQ 90679 72148
12583803, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 3 TQ 9072 SE 1/43
C18. 2 storeys red brick. Renewed pantiled roof. Moulded brick eaves cornice. 2 sashes and 1 blank on 1st floor with verticals only. Left side doorcase with recessed 6 fielded panelled door, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed and a blocked fanlight.
Queenborough CPME11 5AD30-Jun-78TQ 90682 72210
125833577, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 77 TQ 9072 SE 1/50 19.10.51.
C18. 3 storeys and basement brick with brick plinth. Concealed slate roof. Parapet with stone coping. 2nd floor has sash windows with glazing bars intact. Ground floor has octagon bay window with fine scroll and dentil moulding to eaves and lead roof. Flat brick arches of rubbed headers over windows. Ground floor has a panelled doorway with panelled reveals and fanlight over.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG19-Oct-51TQ 90887 72257
125841079 AND 81, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough Nos 79 and 81 TQ 9072 SE 1/51 19.10.51
Early C18 pair. 2 storeys, basement and attics, red brick. Tiled roof with 2 hipped tiled dormers. Fine modillion cornice to eaves. 2 original sash windows in exposed frames and 2 blanks. Flat arches over windows of rubbed brick headers. Brick panels over doors. 2 panelled doors with fanlights and 6 panelled doors.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG19-Oct-51TQ 90892 72260
1258420CHURCH HOUSEC18HouseIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough No 76 TQ 9072 SE 1/65 19.10.51. (Church House)
Said to have belonged to Lady Hamilton. Circa 1700. 2 storeys, basement and attics, red brick. Roof has 2 cambered dormers. Plain eaves. Brick band. 5 sash windows in exposed sash frames with original glazing bars. Rubbed brick headers over windows. 2 small basement windows. Central doorcase with fine fluted pilasters, moulded architrave, ornamented soffit and entablature with triglyph frieze. Panelled reveals. Fanlight over door with circular tracery ornament. 6 fielded panelled doors.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG19-Oct-51TQ 90890 72282
1273461EVANS ROWC18CottageIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough Nos 51 to 65 (odd) (Evans Row) TQ 9072 SE 1/49
A terrace of cottages dated 1701. 2 storeys; attics and basement brick, painted brick and pebbledash. Half hipped tiled roof with 6 hipped dormers. Brick modillion eaves cornice. 1st floor has 8 windows in exposed frames, only 2 having glazing bars intact. Most are now modern casement windows. Some original panelled doors with moulded sides and plain architraves to Nos 51 and 53.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG30-Jun-78TQ 90823 72243
136601283-91, HIGH STREETC18HouseIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough Nos 83 to 91 (odd) TQ 9072 SE 1/52 19.10.51.
A group of early C18 houses. 2 storeys and attics. Brick or stucco. 5 hipped dormers. Moulded eaves cornice. 5 original sash windows in exposed frames. 3 blanks and 1 altered window. No 83 has a later C19 shopfront. Single doorcase to No 89 with a 6-panelled door, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed. Nos 89 and 91 have a fine brick plinth and band.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG19-Oct-51TQ 90907 72261
136601372 AND 74, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough Nos 72 and 74 TQ 9072 SE 1/64
A pair dated on a plaster plaque over door 1706 with the initials ERE. 2 storeys basement and attics red brick with some grey headers. Renewed tiled roof with 2 hipped dormers. Overhanging eaves with course of fine modillions. Part brick stringcourse. 4 modern sash windows in exposed frames. Plinth. 2 doorcases with panelled reveals and rectangular fanlights.
Queenborough CPME11 5AG30-Jun-78TQ 90875 72280
1243182161 AND 163, HIGH STREETC19CottageIIHIGH STREET 5282 Queenborough TQ 97 SW 11/56 Nos 161 and 163 II GV
Cottage pair, No 161 later shop and cottage. Early C19 altered mid C19. Weather- boarded over stud framing with roof partly clay peg tiles and part renewed with asbestos slates and central brick chimneystack: 2 storeys and attics. 2 windows with penticed outshot to No 163 and probably mid C19 gable to rear of No 161. Front has 2 flat roofed dormers, one with casement and one with mid C19 sash with verticals only. No. 161 has 1st floor mid C19 sash with vertical glazing bars and horns, set in original moulded architrave and mid to late C19 shopfront with wide sloping fascia under hood and brackets. Right hand doorcase, door replaced, but with original wooden dentilled cornice above. No 161 has 1st floor original 16 pane sash in moulded archi- trave, ground floor original sash, though 4 of the lower glazing bars have been removed, and left hand doorcase with wooden dentilled cornice and 4 panelled door. Wooden plinth. Gable to rear has mainly mid C19 sashes. Internally both properties retain early C19 fireplaces, one with good cast iron duck’s nest grate, one with panelled wooden surround. Wooden panelled partition walls and 4 panelled doors and some 2 panelled cupboard fronts with HL hinges. Winder staircases.
Queenborough CPME11 5AH22-Aug-86TQ 91108 72202
1258415167, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 167 TQ 97 SW 11/57
C18. 2 storeys and attics brick now roughcast. Modern pantiled roof. Plain dormers. Parapet with stone coping and cornice. 3 sashes with verticals only. Rectangular fanlight and 6 fielded panelled door. The door is flanked by louvred shutters.
Queenborough CPME11 5AH30-Jun-78TQ 91124 72192
1258412121, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough No 121 TQ 97 SW 11/54
Early C19. 2 storeys and attics, weatherboarded. Half-hipped tiled roof with 1 dormer. 1 sash with glazing bars intact. Door with moulded jambs and reeded architrave.
Queenborough CPME11 5AQ30-Jun-78TQ 91008 72232
1258414149 AND 151, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Queenborough Nos 149 and 151 TQ 97 SW 11/55 19.10.51.
C18 pair. 3 storeys brick with plastered plinth, No 151 now painted. Concealed roof. Parapet with stone coping. Brick cornice. 2 sash windows with glazing bars intact. 2 C18 doorcases with rectangular fanlights, pilasters and panelled reveals. 6 fielded panelled doors.
Queenborough CPME11 5AQ19-Oct-51TQ 91078 72217
1258504MILL HOUSEC18HouseIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough Mill House TQ 97 SW 11/72
C18 refaced in mid C19. 2 storeys attics and basement. Rendered facade. Concealed hipped slate roof with dormers. Parapet with stone coping and cornice with dentils. 3 sashes with glazing bars removed. Keystone. C19 porch with moulded architrave and wreath decoration.
Queenborough CPME11 5AQ30-Jun-78TQ 91006 72256
1258419TOWN HALLC18Town HallIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough Town Hall TQ 9072 SE 1/61 19.10.51.
C18 to early C19. The front elevation is of 2 storeys yellow brick. Plain brick pediment in centre with parapet walls on either side. Pyramidal roof of Welsh slate. Open cupola in centre with ornamental weathervane. Projecting clock bracket in centre of pediment with 2 small square lights at either side. Plaster cornice. 1st floor has 3 large diamond-paned windows, the centre window a modified Venetian window. The ground floor has 4 free-standing Tuscan columns forming the arcade and supporting plain architrave and entablature moulding of plaster. Behind are 3 sash windows surrounded by painted brick. Passage way through to Court Hall Place. To the right hand side is a 2-storey C19 brick extension with 1 sash in round-headed architrave to 1st floor and 2 sashes to ground floor. The rear elevation is of red brick and has one dormer and iron ties.
Queenborough CPME11 5EN19-Oct-51TQ 90794 72263
1258500PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITYC14ChurchII*QUEENBOROUGH
933/1/10016 HIGH STREET 19-OCT-51 (North side) PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
Church. Late C14 core, associated with Edward III’s foundation of the town. Tower is very difficult to date and considered by some to be C12 although a C14 date is also possible. Extensive internal C17 fittings. All windows renewed in 1885 which may be the date of a major restoration. MATERIALS: Random rubble with a red tiled roof. PLAN: W tower, nave and chancel in one; SW porch. Corrugated iron building with Gothic windows attached to N side.
EXTERIOR: N and S sides have buttresses, C17 or early C19 in origin, with deep set-offs, angle buttresses to the chancel and two 2-light windows, each light round-headed . 3-light C19 Perpendicular style traceried E window. Each side has a single roof dormer with a hipped roof, tile-hung cheeks and pair of 2-light timber windows with segmental arched heads under a timber hoodmould. The SW porch has a chamfered outer doorway, segmental-headed inner doorway and C19 or C20 boarded roof. Short W tower, difficult to date, with diagonal buttresses, an embattled parapet and large projecting SE stair turret with embattled parapet rising above the top of the tower. The tower also has large W buttresses at right angles to the W face, these are dated 1636 by Pevsner. Victorian Perpendicular style W doorway with carved spandrels, 3-light c. 1900 window above.
INTERIOR: The interior has a canted boarded roof with late C17 painted decoration, now faded and obscured by damage from a 1930s fire in the tower. White clouds and gold stars decorate the portion over the nave. At the E end the centrepiece represents the Angel of the Apocalypse sounding the last trump in a painted egg and dart medallion with cherubim painted in smaller medallions. The painting is thought to be Dutch. There may be an earlier roof structure behind the boards. Hollow-chamfered tower arch. 1610 font with an octagonal bowl on a thick and elaborately moulded baluster-like stem. The bowl is inscribed with the name of Nicholas Taylor ‘Jurat of this towne’ and a bold representation of the postern gate of Queenborough Castle (demolished c.1650) shown with two cannon. Jacobean domed font cover. C19 timber drum pulpit with panelled sides pierced with stylised flower motifs. Nave benches with very simple, thick shaped ends. Chunky choir stalls with reeded backs to the seats include the mayor’s seat, dated 1885. The organ chamber is in a gallery projecting over the S door and forming an internal porch. 1939 gilded sanctuary rails, the remains of a former wrought iron chancel screen. No reredos, partly because changes to the ground level of the churchyard mean that the E window sill is very low. Paintings of Moses and Aaron, dating to c.1700, hang in the nave but presumably originating in the sanctuary. 2 brass candelabra presented in 1718 and 1724.
The late C17 and early C18 fittings correspond to a period of prosperity and much rebuilding in Queenborough, which preserves small but smart houses of this period in the High Street.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: The Church of the Holy Trinity is of immense interest as a parish church of C14 origins with much C17 work and with an outstanding survival of a late C17 painted ceiling and early C17 font with unusual relief carvings. The late C19 reordering of the church, with new windows and internal fittings was sensitively done and complements the earlier fabric. It stands in a churchyard with a wealth of good monuments. The church is a key element, historically and architecturally, in the main street of small town rich in historic buildings.
SOURCES: Pevsner, The Buildings of England, North East and East Kent, 1983, p420 Queenborough Society, A Walk round Historic Queenborough, 1990 Welcome to Queenborough Church, n.d.
MONUMENT TO GREET FAMILY IN CHURCHYARD OF HOLY TRINITY PARISH CHURCH
Queenborough CPME11 5EP19-Oct-51TQ 90917 72306
1258501MONUMENT TO GREET FAMILY IN CHURCHYARD OF HOLY TRINITY PARISH CHURCHC19MonumentIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough Monument to Greet family in churchyard of Holy Trinity Parish Church TQ 9072 SE 1/67
large stone monument to Thomas Young Greet,Esq (d 1829) and other members of the Greet family surmounted by an obelisk and ball finial and bearing the Coat-of-Arms of the Greet family.
Queenborough CPME11 5ET30-Jun-78TQ 90931 72288
1258502FIG TREE HOUSEC18HouseIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough No 108 (Fig Tree House) TQ 9072 SE 1/69
C18 refaced in C19. 2 storeys plastered having C19 mouldings and ornamented architraves and modillions to windows. Half-hipped tiled roof. 5 sashes with original sash bars removed. Central doorway. 2 stone lions couchant before the front door and cast iron railings.
Queenborough CPME11 5ET30-Jun-78TQ 90965 72275
1258503THE VICARAGEC18VicarageIIHIGH STREET (North Side) Queenborough The Vicarage TQ 9072 SE 1/71
C18. 2 parallel ranges. 2 storeys and basement, painted brick. Concealed tiled roof. Parapet. 3 sash windows with glazing bars removed. Central doorcase with fine moulded pilasters and architrave. Triglyph frieze. Panelled reveals. 5 steps to street. Half light to basement.
Queenborough CPME11 5EX30-Jun-78TQ 90996 72258
1258056MEMORIAL TO THOMAS STUTELEY IN HOLY TRINITY CHURCHYARDC19MemorialIITHE BROADWAY (South-East Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Memorial to Thomas Stuteley in Holy Trinity Churchyard TQ 9274 NW 9/8
Dated 1879. Ashlar plinth. Stone square base with inscription and Greek key design and broken pillar above with garland.
SheernessME12 1AB30-Jun-78TQ 92170 74848
12580384-22, THE BROADWAYC19BuildingIITHE BROADWAY (South-East Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Nos 4 to 22 (even) TQ 9274 NW 9/6
Includes Nos 6 and 8 Crescent, Mile Town, Sheerness. Circa 1830. Terrace. 3 storeys stock brick. Cement parapet and moulded eaves cornice. 2 to 3 sashes each with some glazing bars intact but mainly modern shopfronts.
SheernessME12 1AE30-Jun-78TQ 92116 74833
12598231-23, THE BROADWAY, 1 AND 3, CRESCENTC19BuildingIITHE BROADWAY (North-West Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Nos 1 to 23 (odd) TQ 9274 NW 9/3
Includes Nos 1 and 3 Crescent, Mile Town, Sheerness. Circa 1830. Terrace. 3 storeys stock brick. Cement parapet and moulded eaves cornice. 2 to 3 sashes each with some glazing bars intact. Mainly modern shop- fronts, except to Nos 17 and 19 which have the original shopfronts with 2 pilasters and 2 segmental-headed doorcases, one of which, in the case of No 17, is blocked to form a shop window.
SheernessME12 1AE30-Jun-78TQ 92103 74851
1258071CLOCK TOWERC20TowerIICRESCENT Mile Town, Sheerness Clock Tower TQ 9274 NW 9/10
Erected in 1902 to commemorate the coronation of King Edward VII. Built of cast iron, painted. Octagonal column with plinth surmounted by clock faces and bell. Quatrefoil mouldings.
SheernessME12 1AG30-Jun-78TQ 92065 74828
1258883MEDWAY PORTS AUTHORITY OFFICES (DOCKYARD HOUSE)C19HouseII*Garden wall. c1829-33, by George Ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board, and John Rennie Snr, engineer. Yellow stock brick with ashlar coping. Encloses N side of former Officers’ rear garden, with a doorway in the N side with a ball finial, and associated with the former dockyard perimeter wall (qv). HISTORY: Rennie’s model of the yard shows each house with a separate garden, with a possible coach house at the S end. Unlike the other Royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing the entrance, chapel and officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 54-56; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995:1).SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91347 75179
1258952KING WILLIAM LION MONUMENT TO WEST OF MEDWAY PORT AUTHORITY OFFICESC17StatueII933/2/95 King William Lion Monument approx. 4M to West of Dockyard House 15.3.77
Lion statue. C17. Stone. Lion rampant, removed from main gate of 1st Garrison Fort. Included for historic interest.
SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91333 75188
1258982FORMER STABLES TO REAR OF DOCKYARD COTTAGEC19StablesIILion statue. C17. Stone. Lion rampant, removed from main gate of 1st Garrison Fort. Included for historic interest.SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91358 75221
1258983NORTH GATE HOUSEC19Guard HouseII2/99 North Gate House 15.03.1977 GV II
Guard house and police office, now offices. c1826 by George Ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board and Sir John Rennie, engineer, extended late C19. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick headers, granite plinth and limestone dressings, brick ridge and lateral stacks, and slate hipped roof. Late Georgian style. PLAN: 2-room single depth plan with stairs against outer dockyard wall. EXTERIOR: 2 storeys; 4-window range with 3-window S end and lower 1-window N block. A wide granite band beneath ground-floor windows, first-floor sill band, cornice and parapet; round-arched ground-floor windows in matching recesses; flat-headed first-floor windows, with 6/6-pane sashes; E elevation with blind windows against the stair apart from second bay from N. S entrance end rendered to the windowless ground floor, has an E round-arched doorway with fanlight with a central round pane and a 6-panel door with glazed top lights, first floor 6/6-pane sash over doorway and 2 blind windows. W windows all glazed, the lower N extension has paired ground-floor 4/4-pane sashes, and a single 4/4-pane sash above, N lateral stack and a single-storey N lavatory with parapet. INTERIOR contains a dogleg stair from the entrance with iron stick balusters and curtail, 6-panel doors, plain cornices and stone fire surrounds. HISTORY: originally the police house at the entrance to Sheerness Naval Dockyard, and formed the north entrance lodge. Connected to the E boundary wall (qv) and formerly linked to the S lodge (Nos 1 and 2 Main Gate (qv)) opposite by a granite colonnade. Unlike the other royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing offices, the chapel and the officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard. (Source: Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ).
SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91298 75260
1259030BOUNDARY WALL EXTENDS FROM MAIN GATE ROUND SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF FORMER DOCKYARDC19WallIIIncludes: Boundary wall, extends from Main Gate round S and E sides of former Dockyard, HIGH STREET, SHEERNESS DOCKYARD Dockyard boundary wall. 1824-31, by Sir John Rennie. Yellow stock brick with granite plinth and coping. Tall wall with a band of granite ashlar, above which shallow buttresses divide the wall into square panels. Extends approximately 500 metres SE from Nos 1 and 2 Main Gate to the N of the former Dockyard Church (qqv), from where a section ramps down to extend to meet the retaining wall in front of the Church. The main wall runs E of the Dockyard House garden (qv), where it contains a segmental- arched doorway leading from Church Road for officers going to church. The wall along the S side of the yard extends from the Wend of Naval Terrace (qv), and extends W for approx. 300m before turning S for approx. 170m; in the corner ramps lead up to an entrance. This section of wall facing High Street has square lamps on cast-iron brackets attached at intervals. HISTORY: built by Rennie to enclose his complete rebuilding of the Sheerness yard in the 18205. Of historic interest, and part of a good group with the officers’ accommodation, church and offices (qqv) in the little-altered SE corner of the yard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 182; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41).
See under: Boundary wall extends from Main gate round S and E sides of former Dockyard, GARRISON ROAD, SHEERNESS DOCKYARD
SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91372 75228
1273184DOCKYARD COTTAGE AND ATTACHED GARDEN WALL AND BASEMNET RAILINGSC19Officer’s HouseIIC16 or early C17, refronted circa 1800. 2 storeys, stuccoed with tiled roof, hipped at the west end. 2 brick stacks. Windows with louvred shutters and hung sashes with glazing bars. Trellised wood porch. Moulded ceiling beams to interior.SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91338 75226
1273185SOUTH GATE HOUSEC19Gate HouseIIOfficer’s house, now offices. c1826, probably by George Ledwell Taylor, architect for the Navy Board, and Sir John Rennie, engineer. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick heads and limestone dressings, 2 brick lateral stacks each end, and slate hipped roof. Late Georgian style. Double-depth plan. EXTERIOR: 2 storeys, attic and basement; 3-window range. Symmetrical front with first-floor rendered plat band, eaves cornice and blocking course, steps across the basement area to a round-arched doorway in matching recess with a fanlight with round central pane and 6-panel door with raised panels, and flat-headed windows with 6/6-pane sashes; segmental-arched basement lights. The ends have a raised section between the stacks containing a narrow 4-light attic light. I NTERIOR contains a central hall with a segmental arch to a rear transverse dogleg stair with iron stick balusters and curtail with fluted newel, 6-panel doors, enriched cornices and marble fire surrounds with corner roundels. Ground-floor rooms connected by shallow arches. SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: attached brick wall extends approx 40m to the former rear stables ( qv), to enclose the garden to the SW; cast-iron basement area and entrance step railings with urn finials. HISTORY: originally the Boatswain’s house at Sheerness Naval Dockyard. Unlike the other royal dockyards, Sheerness was all built at the same time. Within the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing offices, the chapel and the officers’ accommodation, part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: 1).SheernessME12 1BU15-Mar-77TQ 91323 75250
1436845Former Military HospitalC19Former Military HospitalIIA former military hospital. Work on the hospital commenced in June 1856 and it was opened in October 1857. Designed in Italianate style, the architect is not at present known but the foundations were dug by Messrs R I Carlisle and Co. of Bermondsey and the contractors for the superstructure were Kirk and Parry of Sleaford.
Late C20 additions to the rear do not contribute to special interest.
An artillery fort was established built at the tip of the Sheerness headland in 1545, Sheerness Dockyard was established in 1665 and there was an army garrison separate from the dockyard from the time of the 1667 Dutch raid on the Medway to the mid C20. This former garrison hospital was built in 1856-7 to replace earlier hospitals that had served the late C18 Fort Townsend. These comprised an 1807 hospital situated between bastions 1 and 2, probably removed when the fortifications were improved to provide the ravelin and a building later in use as a guardhouse, but shown on an 1860 plan still labelled as a hospital, which was probably the replacement to the 1807 hospital and the predecessor to the 1856 purpose-built military hospital.
The new hospital was built to serve the Sheerness army garrison and was built within the late C18 Bastion no. 2 of Fort Townsend because a building set apart was needed to separate sick and possibly contagious soldiers from their healthy comrades. The foundations were commenced before March 1856 and the hospital was opened in October 1857. The exterior was designed in Italianate style with a symmetrical principal front of 25 bays. The architect is not at present known but the foundations were dug by Messrs R I Carlisle and Co. of Bermondsey and the contractors for the main structure were Kirk and Parry of Sleaford.
It was one of a few military hospitals built during or just after the Crimean War, which included the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley (1856-63), a military hospital at the Peninsular Barracks, Winchester (1856) and Shoeburyness Barracks Hospital (1856). At this date the pavilion plan with cross-lit ‘Nightingale’ wards was still being worked out and the former military hospital at Sheerness was designed to the earlier plan of small wards opening off a corridor on one side and a ventilation tube system. It pre-dated the 1857 report by the Sanitary Commission on the War in the East and the 1861 report under Herbert for improving the Sanitary condition of Barracks and Hospitals.
The 1863 report of the commission appointed for improving the sanitary condition of Barracks and Hospitals Improvement Commission reported in its Appendix covering Sheerness District that Sheerness Hospital had two staircases, 11 wards 20ft wide and about 25ft long with windows along one side, mainly situated on the first floor. There was a central day room on the first floor and on the ground floor were a number of rooms, chiefly stores, ablution and bathrooms, surgery, medical officers and orderlies rooms and a kitchen. Although the report praised the day room was critical of the existing ventilation tubes and stipulated that larger louvred ventilation shafts and inlets should additionally be inserted into the wards, the corridors should also be ventilated by shafts or by ventilating sky-lights, an ablution table with fixed sunk basins and hot and cold water should be provided and four beds should be removed from each ward because of overcrowding.
Historic photographs and plans show that when built the hospital also had a walled enclosure to the rear, bounded by the walls of no. 2 Bastion. This may have been provided to allow recovering patients to take fresh air without absconding, though 1910 plans show DPS (Drying Posts) indicating that by that date the walls had a laundry related function. The 1910 plans in the National Archives at Kew also show that within the walls there was also a rectangular structure, the very thick inner walls of which suggest that this was possibly a pre-existing magazine within no. 2 Bastion before the hospital was built. These features are no longer visible above ground although there may be buried remains. When built the hospital was close to the Commandant’s House and the Royal Engineers Yard of Well Marsh Barracks but it is now the only surviving army barracks building surviving at Sheerness. An etching probably produced soon after it was opened (reproduced on Page 22 of Bluetown Remembered) shows the principal front of the hospital and a fence separating the building from the rest of Well Marsh.
The building appears on the 1906 Ordnance Survey map, but not on earlier editions for reasons of national security. 1910 plans survive showing the layout of the hospital at that time.
In 1924 the building became the Senior Officers’ School, which re-located from Woking. On the 1933 Third Edition 25 inch sheet it is identified as the Senior Officers’ School and the organisation left sheerness in 1939. A 1947 aerial plan of the hospital site shows the building externally unaltered and retaining its walled enclosure.
In 1968 Thames Steel acquired the building and surrounding land. Steel was produced on the site from 1972 and the former military hospital became the main office. Demolition of the four northern single-storey bays took place after the 1960s and these four bays are not shown on circa 1971 plans of proposed alterations. Works inlcuded the amalgamation of former wards on the first floor and the provision of some additional room partitions on the ground floor. Further proposals of circa 1985 included a new range to the north part of the rear elevation, which was built and some further room partitions. The plant closed in 2012.
The building is now in the ownership of Peel Ports and is mainly unoccupied at present (2016).
This List entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 07/04/2017
A former military hospital. Work on the hospital commenced in June 1856 and it was opened in October1857. Designed in Italianate style, the architect is not at present known but the foundations were dug by Messrs R I Carlisle and Co. of Bermondsey and the contractors for the superstructure were Kirk and Parry of Sleaford. The four northern single-storey bays were demolished after the 1960s, internal refurbishing took place circa 1971 and an extension was added on the northern part of the south-east side circa 1985. Although integral to the structure, the later C20 additions are not of special interest.
MATERIALS: stock brick in Flemish bond, with stuccoed dressings to the principal front. The south-west and north-east ends are cement rendered with incised lines to imitate masonry. Gabled slate roof with four truncated brick chimneystacks, some retaining metal perforated plates of the circa 1863 improved ventilation system.
PLAN: a symmetrical building, originally of 25 bays, mainly of two storeys but with end single-storey wings. The five central bays are taller with a central entrance, flanked by less tall six-bay wings and there were four-bay single-storey end pavilions. Internally there are two staircases at the ends of the building and a full-length corridor to the rear of the building on each floor. There were 11 wards 20 feet wide and about 25 feet long with windows along one side, 8 of which were on the first floor, and a central day-room on the first floor. The ground floor contained an Isolation ward, Detention ward and Inspection ward, stores, ablution and bathrooms, surgery, medical officers and orderlies rooms and a kitchen. This plan was not altered when the building became the Senior Officers School in 1924 although many rooms acquired other functions. After the 1960s the northern single storey four bay section was demolished and after 1968 a few rooms were adjusted in size, were amalgamated or had later partitions inserted.
EXTERIOR: the principal north-east front is almost symmetrical and is now of 21 bays, the four single storey north bays having been demolished after the 1960s . The taller almost central projecting five bays have a stuccoed moulded parapet, string-course and plinth. The windows are six over six sash windows with narrow glazing bars. The first floor windows have moulded surrounds and under cill stops. The central window has an additional pediment. The ground floor windows have moulded surrounds with keystones and stops. The central stuccoed doorcase has a cornice and pilasters and is approached up four later C20 brick steps. There is a C20 glazed door. The flanking slightly lower wings of six bays have identical windows and dressings. The four bay single-storey south end also has identical windows and dressings. There are cast iron ventilation vents at the base of the walls.
The south-west end is cement rendered and has the gable end to the two storey wing with an oculus, a projecting porch with a cornice supported on square piers, originally serving the medical officer’s quarters, and four six over six sash windows.
The south-east rear elevation is of plain brickwork with some rubbed red brick voussoirs. The centre projects with a two-storey gable with end chimneystack to the former day room over the kitchen flanked by a scullery and coal store. At the southern end the brickwork shows the shadow of an earlier lean-to extension. The northern half has a two storey circa 1985 stretcher bond brown brick extension.
The north-west end is mainly cement rendered and the eastern part has a pediment with an oculus and two first-floor later C20 paired sash windows on the first floor and a later C20 door below. The smaller adjoining western 1985 gable is partly of brown brick and partly cement rendered.
INTERIOR: the full length corridors along the ground and first floor on the north-west side retain the original straight flight staircases at the north and south ends which retain the original cast iron handrails and stick balusters heightened by additional later C20 sections of handrail and balusters. The corridors retain original plain skirting boards, wide chamfered door architraves and some window surrounds although the doors and window glazing are C20. Original water closets (refitted) beyond the staircases survive.
The central entrance hall and most rooms on the ground floor retain their original room divisions, plain door architraves and skirting boards. The two southern corridor window plain chamfered architraves are similar to the door architraves and different from those to the next two bays which seem to be secondary. Thereafter they appear to be later insertions. The former medical officer’s quarters retains original domestic type door and window architraves, wooden shutters to the windows, an original half-glazed door and one room retains a wooden built-in cupboard with shelves.
The first floor mainly retains its original ward layout, although the northern two wards have had part of their connecting wall removed to make a larger space and a wall in the small central room, originally used as a pack store, has been removed. Rooms retain the original plain door architraves and skirting boards and the chimneybreasts show evidence of the blocked warm air vents installed after 1863. There is also evidence of blocked vents above the doors on the first floor corridor. The former day room has corbels at the top of the chimneybreast and a dumb waiter. Original water closets beyond the staircases survive, one appears to have been added, perhaps when accommodation for nursing staff was extended.
The roof space was not inspected but a sectional drawing of 1910 shows a wooden queen-post roof with angled struts and recent photographs (2016) were provided by Peel Ports.
Pursuant to s. 1 (5A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (‘the Act’) it is declared that later C20 windows, doors and internal partitions and suspended ceilings are not of special architectural or historic interest.
SheernessME12 1PG24-Aug-16TQ 91596 74920
1273419BETHEL CHAPEL SUNDAY SCHOOLC19SchoolIIHOPE STREET (South-East Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Bethel Chapel Sunday School TQ 9174 NE 8/73 TQ 9274 NW 9/73
Bated 1832. 1 storey stock brick. Pediment with stone coping. 2 round-headed windows with architraves and glazing bars intact. Central round-headed doorcase with pilasters.
SheernessME12 1QH30-Jun-78TQ 91996 74814
1259822BEACH HOUSEC19HouseIIBEACH STREET (North-West Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Beach House TQ 9174 NE 8/2
Early C19. 2 storeys stock brick. Hipped slate roof. 2 sashes and 1 blank with glazing bars intact and Venetian shutters. Central round-headed doorcase with keystone, pilasters, panelled reveals and semi-circular fanlight. The rear elevation has 2 later 3-light canted bays through all floors.
SheernessME12 1RE30-Jun-78TQ 91945 74982
1393518SHEERNESS WAR MEMORIALC20War MemorialIISHEERNESS
933/0/10018 BRIDGE ROAD 11-NOV-09 Sheerness War Memorial
War memorial. Unveiled 29 April 1922, the sculptors were Messrs R L Boulton and Sons.
Cast from re-constituted stone, the memorial comprises a tall plinth, square in section, on a stepped base. On the plinth stands the figure of Liberty, her right hand holding a torch aloft and her left hand holding a scroll. The memorial faces to the south-west.
To the front (south-west) of the monument, cast into the cornice of the plinth, are the words: IN GLORIOUS MEMORY OF THE MEN OF SHEERNESS To the base of the plinth are the words: TRUE LOVE BY LIFE, TRUE LOVE BY DEATH IS TRIED / LIVE THOU FOR ENGLAND, WE FOR ENGLAND DIED
On the south-west face of the plinth are the words: SAILORS, SOLDIERS, AIRMEN / AND CITIZENS. / WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR / 1914-1919, / AND ALSO OF / 1070 OFFICERS AND MEN / OF H.M.S. BULWARK AND / H.M.S. PRINCESS IRENE / LOST IN SHEERNESS HARBOUR / BY INTERNAL EXPLOSION / NOV. 26. 1914 AND MAY 27. 1915. / NAVY / (86 names) / ARMY / (164 names) / AIRFORCE / (3 names)
The Roll of Honour continues on the south-east and north-east faces of the plinth, and bears a total of 253 names.
The north-west face of the plinth reads: CITIZENS LOST IN H.M.S. PRINCESS IRENE / (77 names) / KILLED IN ENEMY AIRCRAFT RAIDS. / NAVY / (6 names) / ARMY / (5 names) / CITIZENS / (6 names)
A separate tablet to the front of the monument reads: ALSO IN COMMEMORATION OF / THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES / IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR / 1939-1945 / AND WHOSE NAMES ARE INSCRIBED / IN THE BOOK OF REMEMBERANCE / IN MINSTER ABBEY CHURCH
HISTORY: The war memorial was erected to honour the servicemen of Sheerness, who fell during the First World War, as well as those who died on the Home Front in Sheerness during the course of the war. It was paid for by voluntary subscription and unveiled on 29 April 1922 by Admiral Sir Hugh Even-Thomas.
The Roll of Honour of servicemen who fell in action includes three Royal Air Force pilots. The pilots were three members of the same family, brothers William, James and John McCudden, all of whom died in action. James McCudden died in July 1918, age 23, as the most decorated officer in the recently formed Royal Air Force, having won the Military Medal, Distinguished Service Order and Bar, Military Cross, Croix de Guerre and the Victoria Cross.
Sheerness suffered a great number of civilian and military casualties at home, through the tragedies of HMS Bulwark, and of HMS Princess Irene, both docked in Sheerness Harbour. In November 1914 HMS Bulwark, part of the Channel fleet, was destroyed by a violent internal explosion. The cause of the explosion was never discovered but the incident resulted in the loss of over 700 lives. Approximately six months later, in May 1915, a minelayer called HMS Princess Irene was destroyed by an internal explosion shortly after having been loaded with her first cargo of mines. Over 300 lives were lost. Sheerness War Memorial remembers military and civilian lives lost in both tragedies, as well as those lost through enemy aircraft raids.
The figure of Liberty is cast in re-constituted stone, possibly due to a shortage of natural stone. Liberty is a secular, non-triumphalist figure, unusual in a First World War memorial; here she is powerfully depicted, draped in classical robes, holding her torch high above her head.
SOURCES: United Kingdom National Inventory of War Memorials, held by the Imperial War Museum.
REASON FOR DESIGNATION Sheerness War Memorial is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * It is a permanent testament to the sacrifice made by this community in the First World War. * The monument is one of few memorials to remember civilian losses suffered during the First World War, in particular those who lost their lives in air raids. * The listing of civilian names alongside military names reflects the strength and importance of the relationship between the citizens of Sheerness, many of whom were employed in the Dockyard, and the Navy for which the Dockyard was a strategic base. * The monument remembers those who died in service in the Air Force, reflecting the early development of aviation as a military tool which later made a fundamental contribution to the Allied victory in the Second World War. * The figure of Liberty is a particularly unusual subject in First World War memorials, as a secular and non-triumphalist tribute to The Fallen.
This List entry has been amended to add sources for War Memorials Online and the War Memorials Register. These sources were not used in the compilation of this List entry but are added here as a guide for further reading, 30 November 2016.
SheernessME12 1RJ11-Nov-09TQ 91816 74987
1258879NUMBERS 1 TO 8 ATTACHED BASEMENT RAILINGS, WALLS, COACH HOUSE AND STABLESC19HouseII*Early C18. 2 storeys; attic in red brick with hipped tile roof with 2 hipped dormers with hung sashes and glazing bars. 3 windows, the centre blocked, hung sashes with glazing bars. 2 windows to ground floor. Imported Roman Ionic columned porch with cornice but no entablature. Door of 6 panels, 2 glazed. Mounting block adjoining the garden wall.SheernessME12 1RR15-Mar-77TQ 91474 75086
1258880RAILINGS TO SOUTH SIDE OF GREEN TO EAST OF NAVAL TERRACEC19RailingsIITerrace of 8 officers’ houses. 1824-27, by George Ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board, and Sir John Rennie, engineer. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick heads, rendered dressings, brick party wall and end gable stacks, and slate roof. Late Georgian style. Double-depth plan. EXTERIOR: 3 storeys, attic and basement; 22-window range. Terrace has a plat band and eaves cornice to a blocking course, the left-hand house has the end bay with the entrance set back; bridges cross basement areas to round-arched doorways in matching recesses with fanlights with a central round pane, and 6-panel doors, the 4 upper ones raised; the two inner blocks have paired doorways, the right-hand end house has a flat headed doorway with a 4-pane overlight. Flat-headed windows with rendered reveals have 6/6-pane sashes, 3/3-pane attic sashes. Right-hand return has 2 lateral stacks on moulded corbels, a window to the right of the door, 2 first-floor windows over it, and a single attic sash. Left-hand return flush with the dock boundary wall (qv), has a 2-window range with a lunette with a batwing fanlight to the entrance hall. Rear fenestration as the front. INTERIOR: No.1 has an entrance hall, with a good central lateral dogleg stair with cast-iron stick balusters and fluted newel, 6-panel doors and panelled shutters, and enriched cornices. SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: attached cast-iron front basement area spear-headed railings with urn finials, the curved green to the front enclosed by a dwarf retaining wall with granite coping, formerly with iron railings; attached rear garden wall extends approximately 30m to N to former coach houses and stables with hipped roof and parapet, segmental-arched coach doors with similar stable doors in raised sections. HISTORY: housed eight senior yard officers, forming a good group with the railed front garden, and the dockyard church (qqv) to the right. There was proportionately more accommodation at Sheerness than the other dockyards because of the remoteness of the site. Unlike the other Royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing the entrance, chapel and officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C 19 dockyard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 54, 58, 59 ; Rennie Sir J: Sir John Rennie’s Treatise on Docks and Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ; Sheerness the Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: 1 ; Archaeologia Cantiana: Harris T: Government and Urban Development in Kent -the case of the Royal: 245-276).SheernessME12 1RR15-Mar-77TQ 91497 75084
1273239FORMER ROYAL DOCKYARD CHURCH AND ATTACHED WALL AND RAILINGSC19ChurchII*Garden wall. c1829-33, by George Ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board, and Sir John Rennie Snr, engineer. Yellow stock brick with ashlar coping. Encloses former Commissioner’s rear garden, with a segmental-arched doorway in the side, and related to the dockyard perimeter wall (qv). HISTORY: unlike the other Royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing the entrance, chapel and officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 54-55; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995:1).SheernessME12 1RR07-Dec-66TQ 91461 75154
1243082BUILDING NUMBER 86C19BuildingII933/5/10002 Sheerness Dockyard Building Number 86 25.4.94
Dockyard building, use unknown, disused. Late C19, after 1889; NE block added after the two earlier ones c1900. Iron frame with brick infill to lower walls, hipped corrugated iron roof to N block and gabled corrugated iron roof to NE block; gabled slate roof to S block. PLAN: 3 sections, a rectangular plan S block with square plan block to N and large external chimney to N of later NE block. EXTERIOR: .single-storey 6-bay S block with upper timber small-paned windows above brick-filled panels, continued round to S gable, which has tall doorway to centre. Similar double tier of fenestration to taller 5- bay N block, also continued round to N end; lantern surmounts hipped roof. 2-storey; 5-bay NE block, with a steel frame and brick panels, roofed parallel to N block and with upper floor clad in corrugated iron above strips of original glazing. INTERIOR: S block has steel or cast-iron H-section columns and wrought-iron trusses, with curved compression members to roof. N block has H-section columns with an iron roof with queen and princess rods and angled struts, and a collar supporting the louvre. NE block has timber roof. HISTORY: probably built for ship repairing and sited to the E of Sir John Rennie’s 1820s dry docks (qv); part of a group with them and the Boat store and Building 84 (qqv). The N block was built on the site of supplying kilns, themselves built between 1847 and 1862. A later dockyard building within Rennie’s planned layout, with group value with the other listed structures. Sources: Sheerness the Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995; NMR BI NO 92379.
SheernessME12 1RS25-Apr-94TQ 90956 75374
1243244FORMER NORTH SAW PITS BUILDING NUMBER 84C19Saw PitsII*933/1/10001 Sheerness Dockyard Former North Saw Pits, 25.04.1994 Building No.84
Saw pits, later office and store, disused. 1828, by William Miller, architect for the Navy Board, iron work by R and F Salisbury, Old Buffery, Dudley, Worcs; truncated mid C20. Iron frame, with end walls and upper part of side walls in brick; hipped double roof with large slates of diminishing courses and some asbestos sheet replacement. PLAN: double-depth rectangular plan, truncated at S end; 7 bays survive of original 10 bays. EXTERIOR: Single storey elevations originally open to E and W sides with original strips of cast-iron small-paned windows above inserted rendered walling; 4-window N end, with arcade of recessed semi-circular arched windows with glazing bar sashes. INTERIOR: contains 2 trusses with wrought-iron tension members to flat cast-iron ties and braces, supported by an axial row of cast-iron columns, joined to perimeter T -section columns by cast-iron beams and a central valley beam; each of the internal columns has diagonal braces both parallel and at right angles to the trusses; iron laths to slates. HISTORY: originally a 10-bay open structure providing cover each for a pair of saw pits. The internal frame and external walls similar to those used by Edward Holl for the 1826 mast house (Building 26, qv). An example of the experimental iron construction developed by Rennie and Holl and pioneered in the dockyards. An important example of a free-standing iron frame, and forming part of a unique early C19 dockyard. (Sources: Sheerness, the Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: NMR BINO 93279; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41).
SheernessME12 1RS25-Apr-94TQ 90987 75361
1244508BOUNDARY WALLS EXTENDES FROM MAIN GATE ALONG NORTH AND NORTH EAST SIDEC19WallIISaw pits, later office and store, disused. 1828, by William Miller, architect for the Navy Board, iron work by R and F Salisbury, Old Buffery, Dudley, Worcs; truncated mid C20. Iron frame, with end walls and upper part of side walls in brick; hipped double roof with large slates of diminishing courses and some asbestos sheet replacement. PLAN: double-depth rectangular plan, truncated at S end; 7 bays survive of original 10 bays. EXTERIOR: Single storey elevations originally open to E and W sides with original strips of cast-iron small-paned windows above inserted rendered walling; 4-window N end, with arcade of recessed semi-circular arched windows with glazing bar sashes. INTERIOR: contains 2 trusses with wrought-iron tension members to flat cast-iron ties and braces, supported by an axial row of cast-iron columns, joined to perimeter T -section columns by cast-iron beams and a central valley beam; each of the internal columns has diagonal braces both parallel and at right angles to the trusses; iron laths to slates. HISTORY: originally a 10-bay open structure providing cover each for a pair of saw pits. The internal frame and external walls similar to those used by Edward Holl for the 1826 mast house (Building 26, qv). An example of the experimental iron construction developed by Rennie and Holl and pioneered in the dockyards. An important example of a free-standing iron frame, and forming part of a unique early C19 dockyard. (Sources: Sheerness, the Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: NMR BINO 93279; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41).SheernessME12 1RS13-Aug-99TQ 90938 75425
1255552WALLS AND GATES OF THE BOAT BASIN, DOCKS NUMBER 4 5 AND SLIPWAYC19WallII*Cottage, possibly originally a toll cottage. Circa 1830-40.’Gothick’ Style. Pebbledashed brick with hipped tiled roofand central square cemented stack. Wide eaves cornice. One storey; 2 windows. Principal elevation to School Lane has pilasters, plinth and 2 ogee-headed windows with marginal glazed casements. Central cambered doorcase has 2 full-height round-headed panels and elaborate Gothick doorknocker. Elevation to Fox Hill has pilasters, plinth and 2 intact ogee-headed windows. South elevation has 2 ogee-headed windows, one boarded over, the other with upper part only intact at time of survey. West elevation has one blocked ogee-headed window and small C20 flat-roofed extension in matching materials. Attached to the north west by a stock brick wall is an original square stock brick one storey outhouse with hipped roof. Interior retains original joinery, including plank cupboard and wooden mantelpiece to north east room, cupboard to south east room and at least 3 four-panelled doors.SheernessME12 1RS15-Mar-77TQ 90853 75334
1258986ARCHWAY HOUSE BUILDING NUMBER 23C19SawyerII*Pay office, now offices. 1828, probably by William Miller, Admiralty architect, and Sir John Rennie, engineer; altered 1892, repaired and extended after fire 1980s. Yellow stock brick with stone dressings, and slate hipped roof. PLAN: central axial hall with offices and pay room in the W bay and guard room in the 2 E bays, with 1987 single-room extension to the north. EXTERIOR: 2-storeys and basement; 5-bay front with 6-bay sides. Symmetrical front with plat band, cornice and blocking course, the three central bays set back, rubbed brick heads to round-arched windows all round, those in the front in matching recesses. Outer 2-light and inner 4-light transom windows with fanlights, central doorway with 2-leaf panelled doors, flat-headed first-floor 616-pane thin-bar sashes; formerly entrance to the left of the doorway. Matching side elevations, the E side with doorways at both ends. Rear formerly as the front, has 1987 2-storey extension, slightly lower but modelled on the front, with a 2 Tuscan columns to a flat canopy. INTERIOR not inspected, but reported to contain three cast-iron Tuscan columns along the axis of the hall, cantilevered stone open well stair to the right of the door (formerly another at the opposite end), NW strong room with an iron door, basement with fish-belly cast-iron joists across central passage; king post roof. HISTORY: built during the second phase of work in the Yard, after the dock walls and engineering works were complete. Has some similarities with the Pay Offices at Devonport and Portsmouth, both of which contain fire-proof elements (qqv). Unlike the other Royal dockyards, Sheerness was rebuilt all at the same time. The Pay Office is part of the complete north-east section of the Yard, part of a unique planned C19 dockyard. (Sources: Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: NMR BI 93279).SheernessME12 1RS01-Aug-68TQ 91062 75137
1259029GARRISON POINT FORTC19FortIISHEERNESS DOCKS Sheerness Garrison Point Fort TQ 9075 NE 4/114 15.3.77. TQ 9075 SE 5/114
Built in the 1860s replacing Sir Bernard de Gomme’s fortifications of 1669. A semi-circular fort of granite blocks to the seaward side with blank cambered arches and of ashlar blocks to the landward side with 2 tiers of gun emplacements. Granite parapet and end quoins. Modern look-outs in roof.
SheernessME12 1RS15-Mar-77TQ 90784 75544
1273160SHED NUMBER 78 THE BOAT STORE BUILDING NUMBER 78C19Boat StoreIC18. 2 storeys, weatherboarded, with hipped Welsh slate roof. 3 windows to 1st floor, C19 casements, the ground floor having sashes without glazing bars. Wood plain door. 2 windows to rear elevation, hung sashes with glazing bars.SheernessME12 1RS21-Jun-62TQ 90888 75297
1244510FORMER SAWMILL BUILDING NUMBERS 105-107C19Saw MillIIMast and boat house, now store. 1821-26, by Edward Holl, architect for the Navy Board, and John Rennie Snr, engineer. Yellow stock brick with slate hipped roof and internal iron frame. Rectangular open plan. EXTERIOR: 2-storey; 14×10-window range. North and east fronts have a ground-floor arcade of round arches with rubbed brick heads and iron fanlights, most altered or replaced, and rubbed brick flat heads to first-floor windows, larger hoist doors to the N side, 8112-pane metal tilting casement to the E; S front has ground-floor round-arched openings within recesses, blocked to the ends. E elevation obscured by later building, has wide flat-headed openings with large cast-iron lintels dated 1825, some containing double doors with small-paned lights above. Plat band, cornice and parapet. INTERIOR: contains an internal frame of ground-floor cast-iron columns with diagonal cruciform struts supporting longitudinal beams with parabolic bottom flanges, with lateral beams bolted along the sides, all with curved top profiles, with sockets in the sides holding joists, supporting timber boards. Upper floor has similar columns and braces bolted to valley beams, with 5-bay roof with trusses of cast-iron ties and struts with king and princess rods; 2 central bays have glazed ridges and the central area of first floor opened, all probably C20. A stair in the rear leads down to the culvert with iron gates formerly leading to the mast pond. HISTORY: one of two matching buildings used for constructing and storing masts and small boats, either side of a central mast pond, the second store and the pond now demolished and filled in. Built above a mast tunnel culvert leading from the river to underground vaults for storing masts under water, the latter also apparently filled in. The frame is part of an important strain in the early C19 development of metal and fire-proof structural systems, devised by Holl and used at the Devonport Ropery (1815), Chatham Lead Mills (1818) and subsequently Archway House, Sheerness (1825). The 1813 New Tobacco Warehouse, London (II*), used a similar system of diagonal cast-iron braces though to a timber roof. One of the last surviving dock buildings from Rennie’s planned dockyard, and one of only two examples of a once-common naval building type. (Sources: Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851:41; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: NMR BI NO 93279).SheernessME12 1RT13-Aug-99TQ 91157 75249
1258985FORMER PAY OFFICE BUILDING NUMBER 104C19Pay OfficeIIGuard house and police office, now offices. c1826 by George Ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board and Sir John Rennie, engineer, extended late C19. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick headers, granite plinth and limestone dressings, brick ridge and lateral stacks, and slate hipped roof. Late Georgian style. PLAN: 2-room single depth plan with stairs against outer dockyard wall. EXTERIOR: 2 storeys; 4-window range with 3-window S end and lower 1-window N block. A wide granite band beneath ground-floor windows, first-floor sill band, cornice and parapet; round-arched ground-floor windows in matching recesses; flat-headed first-floor windows, with 6/6-pane sashes; E elevation with blind windows against the stair apart from second bay from N. S entrance end rendered to the windowless ground floor, has an E round-arched doorway with fanlight with a central round pane and a 6-panel door with glazed top lights, first floor 6/6-pane sash over doorway and 2 blind windows. W windows all glazed, the lower N extension has paired ground-floor 4/4-pane sashes, and a single 4/4-pane sash above, N lateral stack and a single-storey N lavatory with parapet. INTERIOR contains a dogleg stair from the entrance with iron stick balusters and curtail, 6-panel doors, plain cornices and stone fire surrounds. HISTORY: originally the police house at the entrance to Sheerness Naval Dockyard, and formed the north entrance lodge. Connected to the E boundary wall (qv) and formerly linked to the S lodge (Nos 1 and 2 Main Gate (qv)) opposite by a granite colonnade. Unlike the other royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing offices, the chapel and the officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard. (Source: Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ).SheernessME12 1RT18-Jan-72TQ 91203 75234
1258224RED LION PUBLIC HOUSEC18Public HouseIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Blue Town, Sheerness Red Lion Public House TQ 9175 SW 2/21
C18. 3 storeys weatherboarded. Parapet and hipped tiled roof. Tripartite window to 1st floor and single sash window above. C19 shopfront.
SheernessME12 1RW30-Jun-78TQ 91177 75026
1258225FORMER COUNTY COURTC19CourtIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Blue Town, Sheerness Former County Court TQ 9175 SW 2/24 17.2.78
Mid C19. 2 storeys buff brick with stuccoed dressings. Asymmetrical shape. Parapet with Royal Cartouche. Bracket cornice. 3 large round-headed sashes set in rusticated architraves with pilasters. This portion projects and is flanked by 2 cambered doorcases. To the right of this is a further projecting portion having a tripartite window with heavy cornice and to the right of this is a recessed 1 storey portion with 1 sash. End quoins. Plinth.
SheernessME12 1RW17-Feb-78TQ 91098 75026
1259031A G SMITH AND SONS DEPOSITORYC18ChapelIIUNION STREET (North Side) Blue Town, Sheerness A G Smith & Sons Depository TQ 9174 NW 3/119
Formerly a Bethel Chapel. Dated 1787 with the initials W S in the datestone. 2 storeys red brick. Parapet with stone coping. 3 windows to the 1st floor, the centre one being a modified Venetian window with glazing altered. Beneath the central window is the inscription “He shall establish his strength” Bethel Chapel and on sundial with the initials BST. The ground floor has 2 round-headed doorcases with keystone. Cambered windows in centre with keystone. Mansard roof now covered with corrugated iron sheeting, 5 cambered windows to side elevation.
SheernessME12 1RW30-Jun-78TQ 91202 74992
127351953, HIGH STREET, BLUE TOWN, SHEERNESSC19BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Blue Town, Sheerness No 53 TQ 9175 SW 2/20
Early C19. 3 storeys buff brick. Concealed roof and recessed panelled parapet. 2 sashes to each floor with glazing bars intact to 1st floor only. C19 shopfront.
SheernessME12 1RW30-Jun-78TQ 91206 75036
1258881NUMBERS 1 TO 15 AND ATTACHED RAILINGSC19HouseII*Length of railings. c1824-1827. Cast-iron. Spear-headed railings extend approximately 100m along S side of the triangular green to the E of Naval Terrace (qv). HISTORY: Laid out with the officers’ Naval Terrace and the Dockyard Church (qqv) at the southern extremity of the dockyard. Unlike the other royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing the entrance, chapel and officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C 19 dockyard. (Source: Sheerness, the Dockyard, Defences and Blue T own: 1995: 1).SheernessME12 1SG15-Mar-77TQ 91343 75114
1258882WALL EXTENDING APPROXIMATELY 85 METRES ENCLOSING GARDEN TO NORTH OF NUMBERS 1 TO 15C19WallIITerrace of officers’ houses, now 15 houses and offices. c1829-33, by George ledwell Taylor, architect to the Navy Board, and John Rennie Snr, engineer. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick heads and rendered dressings, party wall and end gable ridge brick ridge stacks, and slate mansard roof. Late Georgian style. PLAN: double-depth plan, possibly originally back-to-back houses divided into two at the rear. EXTERIOR: each 2 storeys, attic and basement; 5-window range. The terrace has a rendered plat band, cornice and blocking course; each house has a central timber porch with paired pilasters, cornice and blocking course, with architraves to the doorway with double 6-panel door with raised panels, and to 9-pane windows to the sides. Flat-headed windows have 6/6- pane sashes and rendered reveals, and flat-headed attic dormers have 6/6-pane sashes. Similar rear with early C20 lavatories projecting over central entrances on iron posts; the windows of each section spaced 3:2 with the door to the left. INTERIOR: the front houses have a central hall, enriched cornices, panelled shutters and doors, the rear, with similar fittings, has a curved dogleg stair from the entrance hall with stick balusters, fluted newel and curtail, and an inner back door with stained glass margin panes. SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: attached cast-iron basement area spear-headed railings with urn finials. HISTORY: housed Yard Officers, a matching design to the adjoining Commissioner’s House (qv) and referred to as “Houses for Inferior Officers” (Coad). It is accordingly less grand than Nos 1-8 Naval Terrace (qv). There was proportionately more accommodation at Sheerness than the other dockyards because of the remoteness of the site. The original internal planning is unclear, but each house may always have been divided into three. Unlike the other Royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Forms part of the little-altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing the entrance, chapel and officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early (19 dockyard. (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 54; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41; Sheerness, The Dockyard, Defences and Blue Town: 1995: 1).SheernessME12 1SG15-Mar-77TQ 91393 75141
1273213WALL EXTENDING APPROXIMATELY 70 METRES ENCLOSING GARDEN TO SOUTH OF DOCKYARD HOUSEC19WallIIGatehouse and office, now offices. Mid 1820s, probably by George Ledwell Taylor, architect for the Navy Board, and Sir John Rennie, engineer. Yellow stock brick with rubbed brick heads, granite plinth and limestone dressings, brick ridge and lateral stacks, and slate hipped roof. late Georgian style. PLAN: 2-room single depth plan with central transverse stair and l-shaped S annexe. EXTERIOR: 2 storeys; 4-window range with 3-window N end and single storey; 4-window S annexe. Wide granite band beneath ground-floor windows, first-floor cill band, cornice and parapet; round-arched ground- floor windows in matching recesses; flat-headed first-floor windows, with 6/6-pane sashes; outer E elevation with blind windows. N entrance end rendered to the ground floor with 3 round-arched recesses, that to the E with a round-arched doorway with fanlight with a central round pane and a 6-panel door with glazed top lights, central arch has an inserted 3/6-pane sash; first floor 6/6-pane sash over doorway and 2 blind windows. W side has a round-arched doorway, as the end, one bay from the S. lower S section, possibly former guard house, has 1-bay forward wing to the end with a tall end lateral stack, with an arcade of round-arched former entrances with worn doorsteps linked by the impost band, and a parapet, containing late C19 inserted doorway with fanlight and flanking late C19 tripartite sashes with margin panes; the short wing has an original 6/6- pane round-headed sash. INTERIOR contains a dogleg stair from the W entrance with iron stick balusters and curtail with fluted newel, 6-panel doors, plain cornices and stone fire surrounds. HISTORY: originally contained the police station and surgery, and formed one of the entrance lodges to Sheerness Naval Dockyard. Connected to the E boundary wall (qv) and formerly linked to the N lodge (The Gatehouse, Main Gate (qv)) opposite by a granite colonnade. Unlike the other royal dockyards, Sheerness was all rebuilt at the same time. Within the little altered SE corner of Rennie’s model layout, containing offices, the chapel and the officers’ accommodation, and part of a unique planned early C19 dockyard.SheernessME12 1SG15-Mar-77TQ 91386 75152
1243077OUTBUILDING TO REAR OF THE ROYAL FOUNTAIN HOTELC18Out BuildingIIWEST STREET (East Side) Blue Town, Sheerness Outbuilding to rear of the Royal Fountain Hotel TQ 9174 NW 3/124
The facade to West Lane is C19 but to the rear there is an C18 tarred weatherboarded building of 2 storeys with 4 sashes with glazing bars intact. T-shaped rear part having hipped old tiled roof. The front part has a slate roof.
SheernessME12 1SW30-Jun-78TQ 91124 74950
1243144THE ROYAL FOUNTAIN HOTELC18HotelIIWEST STREET (East Side), Blue Town, Sheerness, No 15 (The Royal Fountain Hotel)
An C18 hotel with Nelson associations. Corner building. The West Street elevation is of 3 storeys and attics faced with rough plaster and paint. 4 dormers. Painted plinth. 4 windows to each floor. The 1st floor has bow windows and panelled sash boxes and moulded head. 3 cambered sashes to ground floor. Front entrance has moulded pilasters and architrave, panelled reveals and Vitruvian scroll frieze. Grooved surround to doorway. The south elevation is of brown brick. 3 cambered sashes. Painted plinth.
SheernessME12 1SW02-Mar-50TQ 91109 74944
1244509FORMER WORKING MAST HOUSE BUILDING NUMBER 26C19Mast and boat houseII*Dockyard boundary wall. c1824-31, by Sir John Rennie, engineer. Yellow stock brick with granite plinth and coping. Tall wall with a band of granite ashlar, above which shallow buttresses divide the wall into square panels. Extends approximately 510 metres NW from the Main Gate (qv), and meets the Boat Basin (qv). Interrupted by Jetty Road entrance. HISTORY: built by Rennie to enclose his complete rebuilding of the Sheerness yard in the 18205. Part of a group with the boundary wall to the S (qv). (Sources: Coad J: The Royal Dockyards 1690-1850: Aldershot: 1989: 182; Rennie Sir J: The Formation and Construction of British and Foreign Harbours: London: 1851: 41 ).SheernessME12 1SW13-Aug-99TQ 90874 74922
12731613, UNION STREETC19BuildingIIUNION STREET (North Side) Blue Town, Sheerness No 3 TO 9174 NW 3/118
Early to mid C19. 3 storeys buff brick. Hipped roof now covered with corrugated iron sheeting. 2 cambered sashes with glazing bars intact to front only, verticals to side elevation. Doorcase with pilasters, cornice and 6 fielded panelled door, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed.
SheernessME12 1SX30-Jun-78TQ 91206 74979
127351841, HIGH STREETC19BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Blue Town, Sheerness No 41 TQ 9175 SW 2/16 12.3.76.
Early C19. 3 storeys buff brick. Plaster cornice. 2 sashes to 2nd floor, 2 bows to lst floor and C19 shop window to ground floor.
SheernessME12 1TA12-Mar-76TQ 91274 75034
1242981REMAINS OF WINDMILL IN GROUNDS OF SEAVIEW HOTELC18Wind MillIITHE BROADWAY (North Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Remains of windmill in grounds of Seaview Hotel TQ 9274 NW 9/4
C18. Stock brick partly stuccoed base of cylindrical shape tapering inwards towards the top. Slate roof.
SheernessME12 1TF30-Jun-78TQ 92452 74945
125822695, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (West Side) Mile Town, Sheerness No 95 TQ 9274 NW 9/28
C18. 2 storeys wood stuccoed and grooved in invitation of masonry. Hipped slate roof. Parapet. 2 sashes. Later shopfront. The Wood Street elevation has a slate roof with 1 hipped dormer. 2 sashes without glazing bars and 2 doorcases, 1 with wooden cornice and brackets.
SheernessME12 1TX30-Jun-78TQ 92091 74751
12588766-10, ROSE STREETC18BuildingIIROSE STREET (South-East Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Nos 6 to 10 (even) TQ 9274 NW 9/84 25.2.77.
Late C18 to early C19. 2 storeys weatherboarded. Hipped slate roof. Parapet. 1 sash to each with glazing bars intact to Nos 6 and 8. These have doorcases with cornices, reeded pilasters and 6 fielded panelled doors. No 10 has a Victorian stock brick extension built on with a 6 panelled door incorporated and a shopfront with 6 cambered panels.
SheernessME12 1TX27-Feb-77TQ 92048 74776
1258227WOOD STREET, 97, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (West Side) Mile Town, Sheerness No 97 TQ 9274 NW 9/29
Late C18 to early C19. Corner building. 2 storeys weatherboarded. Renewed tiled roof in 2 hips. 1 sash with glazing bars intact to ground floor window only on Wood Street elevation. Doorcase with wooden cornice and brackets and 4 flush panels.
SheernessME12 1UA30-Jun-78TQ 92100 74744
1258330REMAINS OF CORNMILL TO REAR OF NUMBER 111C19Corn MillIIHIGH STREET (West Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Remains of corn mill to rear of No 111 TQ 9274 NW 9/31
Early C19. An octagonal base of 2 storeys stock brick. Glazing now missing from windows.
SheernessME12 1UD30-Jun-78TQ 92102 74702
1258331BANKS TERRACEC19BuildingIIHIGH STREET (East Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Nos 266 to 274 (even) (Banks Terrace) TQ 9274 SW 10/41
An early C19 terrace. 3 storeys brick. Slate roof. Stuccoed cornices. 11 sash windows to each floor with painted reveals to the windows. The ground floor has alternate glass panelled doors with bay windows between. Painted ground floor plinth with balcony over with east iron railings. No 266 has a square bay with sash windows on the ground floor and first floor.
SheernessME12 1UP30-Jun-78TQ 92393 74433
1258778NEPTUNE TERRACEC19HouseIIMARINE PARADE (North Side) Marine Town, Sheerness Nos 1 to 10 (consec) (Neptune Terrace) TQ 97 SW 11/76
An early C19 terrace, 2 storeys, cement rendered. 3 pedimented projections, one centre, two ends. Central pediment has niche with Neptune standing upon the head of a sea monster. The side pediments have niches with cement shell and rock ornaments. 20 sashes in all. Stucco architraves and archivolts to entrance doors with enriched keystones which depict mermen with a cornucopia. Pilasters with capitals having mermaids riding sea horses. Slate roofs. Cast iron spear rails to areas. The rear elevation has a roof with a succession of hips.
SheernessME12 2AN30-Jun-78TQ 92592 74937
1258794STABLE BLOCK TO SOUTH WEST OF NUMBER 124C19StatueIIMARINE PARADE (North Side) Marine Town, Sheerness Stable block to south-west of No 124 TQ 97 SW 11/78 2.3.50.
Mid C19. 2 storeys buff brick with hipped slate roof. 7 sashes, mostly with verticals only. 1 square 4-light bay on the ground floor and hipped slate weatherporch.
SheernessME12 2BE02-Mar-50TQ 93232 74932
1273262CHEYNEY HOUSE THE ROCK HOUSEC18HouseIIMARINE PARADE (North Side) Marine Town, Sheerness No 124 (The Rock House) TQ 97 SW 11/77 2.3.50. No 126 (Cheyney House)
A C18 house facing the sea. 3 storeys brick. Parapet with stone coping and hidden slate roof. 5 windows to 1st and 2nd floors, internally recessed sashes with plaster reveals. Two late C18 doors, one with circular traceried fanlight, square projecting window on 1st floor.
SheernessME12 2BE02-Mar-50TQ 93242 74936
1273263GROTTO SHAPED FOLLY TO NORTH EAST OF SHIP ON SHORE PUBLIC HOUSEC19FollyIIMARINE PARADE (South Side) Marine Town, Sheerness Grotto-shaped folly to north-east of Ship on Shore Public House TQ 97 SW 11/81
Circa 1830. This Grotto was built by a farmer who found a ship’s cargo of cement in barrels washed up on the coast. As the barrels had become soaked with sea water the cement had set to form barrel shaped blocks which were used to build the folly’s walls. 1 storey built of cement blocks, flint and burr bricks. 5 pointed arches, now filled in by weatherboarding. Parapet with a succession of curves.
SheernessME12 2BX30-Jun-78TQ 93546 74895
1258332THE ABBEY GATEHOUSEC13Gate HouseIHIGH STREET (North Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness The Abbey Gatehouse
14.5.52.
This gatehouse and the Abbey Church are the only remaining portions of Minster Abbey. C13. 3 storeys. 2 windows facing south, 1 window facing east. Stone and flints. Stringcourses. Castellated parapet of chequer work of stone and knapped flints. Modern casement windows, those on the south front on the 2nd floor being placed in mediaeval openings with 4-centred heads. 1 cinquefoil- headed lancet on the 2nd floor of the east front. Pointed carriage archway in the south-west corner, pointed pedestrian arch to the east of it. 3 cinquefoil- headed lancet windows on the north front with a chimney corbelled out between 2 of them on the 2nd floor. Pointed carriage archway on this side as wide as both the carriage and pedestrian archways of the south front together. Square projection in the north-east corner with pointed lancet windows.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 2HW14-May-52TQ 95565 72998
1242870PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITYC19ChurchIISHEERNESS
933/9/7 THE BROADWAY 30-JUN-78 MILE TOWN (Southeast side) PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
1835-6 by G L Taylor.
MATERIALS: Yellow brick with sandstone dressings. Welsh slate roofs.
PLAN: Nave, chancel, N and S aisles (expressed internally only), W tower with staircase vestibules to the N and S of it.
The church is oriented S so all directions given here are liturgical.
EXTERIOR: The church is built in a plain lancet style, typical of the 1830s. The W tower is of three stages, the lowest containing a plain arched doorway, the second an attractive and unusual rose window, and the third the belfry windows which are tall, paired lancets. The tower is crowned by a plain parapet with pinnacles at the corners. The rest of the church also has a plain parapet. The nave is of seven bays and has shallow buttresses demarcating the bays, each of which contains a tall lancet window. The chancel is short in the pre-Victorian tradition, has blank side walls and an E window consisting of three graded lancets. Either side of the tower are vestibules with N and S entrances and which were designed to house stairs to the galleries. On the W wall of the S vestibule is an interestingly designed bronze monument to J S Keddell (died 1870) and which bears masonic symbols.
INTERIOR: The walls are plastered and painted: white paint has also been applied, regrettably, to most other surfaces too. The interior character stems largely from the presence of the galleries on three sides (no galleries in the two E bays of the nave). Whereas most 1830s churches of this type had galleries round three sides of a rectangular, aisleless space (with the supporting columns and space beneath the N and S galleries forming their own aisles), here there are fully developed aisles with tall arcades behind which the galleries are set. The tall piers of this arcade have octagonal bases above which the main part of the pier has flat surfaces on the diagonals and small shafts in the cardinal directions. The piers merge seamlessly into the arches, which rise almost to roof level without the presence of capitals. The W part of the gallery also has four cast-iron columns to support it. The roof trusses consist of tie-beams with panel tracery above them. The underside of the ceiling consists of flat surfaces of plain plastering.
PRINCIPAL FIXTURES: The chancel has been cleared of its Georgian or Victorian fittings (presumably in the 1970s reordering which is probably the time of the painting over of all internal surfaces). The Victorian seating in the nave, with shaped ends, is largely intact however. The gallery fronts have trefoiled arcading. On the N and S sides the galleries have been boxed in to create storage space. The font is Victorian and is octagonal with a sturdy base with gable-like features surrounding it. The stained glass in the E window is dated 1902.
HISTORY: The cost of the church was £4,128 of which the Church Building Commissioners contributed £2,595. The church had 1,085 seats, 738 of which were free. The land was donated by Sir Edward Banks and the foundation stone was laid on 1 September 1835. Consecration took place on 30 August 1836 by Archbishop Howley. It was initially a chapel of ease to Minster Abbey, only becoming parochial in 1873.
The architect, George Ledwell Taylor (1788-1873), was born in London and was articled in 1804 to J T Parkinson for whom he supervised the building of parts of the Portman Estate in London. In 1824 he was appointed Civil Architect to the Navy and carried out important works at Sheerness, Chatham, Gosport and Woolwich. He came into contact with William IV and claimed that it was his tact that led the King in 1830 to accept ‘Trafalgar Square’ instead of ‘King William IV Square’ as the name for the new open space on the site of the King’s Mews. After he lost his post as a result of reorganisation in 1837 he was forced to take up general practice.
The church is relatively unusual in that it did not acquire a long chancel as was usual in Victorian times. Plans to have one were in existence in 1885, drawn up by the Tunbridge Wells architect Robert Wheeler. It seems likely that at this time reseating took place with the introduction of the present open seats with their shaped ends.
SOURCES: Incorporated Church Building Society papers, Lambeth Palace Library, files 1166, 8981. Howard Colvin, A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects, 3rd ed, 1995, p 960-1. Colin Johnson, Holy Trinity Sheerness, 2004 ed. (church guide). John Newman, The Buildings of England: North East and East Kent, 1983, p 456. Michael Port, Sic Hundred New Churches: the Church Building Commission 1818-1856, 2007, p 334.
SheernessME12 2PQ30-Jun-78TQ 92184 74827
1242869ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH OF ST HENRY AND ST ELIZABETHC19ChurchIITHE BROADWAY (North Side) Mile Town, Sheerness Roman Catholic Church of St Henry and St Elizabeth TQ 9274 NW 9/5 TQ 97 SW 11/5
Dated 1863-4 by Edward Welby Pugin. Built of stock brick with black brick bands. Slate roof. The west end has a bellcote. North and south aisles. 5 bay nave.
SheernessME12 2TF30-Jun-78TQ 92490 74940
1259760SHEPPY COURTC19HouseIIHALFWAY ROAD (West Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Sheppey Court TQ 97 SW 12/153
House, later converted to nursing home. Early C19, built for Sir Edward Banks (1770-1835). Greek Revival style. The 1968 extension attached to the west is not of special interest.
BUILDING MATERIALS: Stuccoed with incised lines to imitate masonry on stuccoed plinth. Shallow pitched slate roof.
PLAN: Almost rectangular building of two storeys; three bays to east entrance front and seven bays to north and south sides.
EXTERIOR: The eastern entrance front has six-pane sash windows to the first floor, except for the central window, replaced by two narrow sashes in the C20. The ground floor has tall 12-pane French windows either side of a shallow Doric porch “in antis”. The north and south sides have have seven bays, the eastern end bay to both sides projecting slightly. Both have six-pane sashes to the upper floor and twelve-pane sashes to the ground floor. Many windows are original but some ground floor windows on the south side have been blocked later and many ground floor cills replaced in concrete. The third bay from the eastern end on the north side has a Greek Revival doorcase with cornice and pilasters.
INTERIOR: Original fittings remain in the eastern three bays. The eastern ground floor bay comprises one large reception room the full width of the building, probably originally two rooms with a narrrow central passageway between. This room contains a narrow moulded cornice, deep skirting board and window shutters. Against the western wall of the northern part of the room is an early C19 marble fireplace with anthemion motif in the upper corners, reeding and cast iron firegrate. Against the western wall of the southern part of the room is a plainer marble fireplace with paterae and cast iron firegrate. Doorcases in the eastern part of the building have moulded architraves and four fielded panels. To the east of the large reception room is a staircase-hall with well staircase, the lowest five treads turning a quarter circle. There are two stick balusters to each tread, scrolled tread ends and plain cylindrical newel posts. The landing has a section of curved balustrading. Beside this is a cambered arch with pilasters.
HISTORY: Sheppey Court was built by Sir Edward Banks as a country retreat. His London house was in Adelphi Terrace, Westminster and he had country properties at Oxney Court near Dover and Sheppey Court. Banks was an important builder and contractor who had already worked on several canals, tram roads and turnpikes by 1807 when, with his partner the Rev William John Jolliffe, the firm became perhaps the largest contractor of the time for undertaking the engineering of public works. With John Rennie the firm carried out projects in the London Docks, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge and London Bridge. Jolliffe and Banks were also, with Nicholson of Rochester, employed in a series of excavation, piling and walling contracts for Rennie’s Sheerness naval dockyard (1812-1830), a £3 million work designed for “the building and equipment of ships of war of the largest dimensions”. They failed to win a further contract in 1817 as they refused to bring down their price to within £2000 of the lowest tender. They did however subsequently construct the northern sector, an £850,000 contract. Close to the naval dockyard Banks founded Banks town (later Sheerness-on-sea) as a speculation providing a thrice weekly service from Sheerness by steamboat (built by Jolliffe, Banks and Co.) Sheppey Court is likely to have been built after 1812, when Banks started his contract at Sheerness dockyard and well before 1835 when he died. The footprint of the early C19 part of Sheppey Court is shown on the First Edition O S map of 1873 and subsequent editions through to the Fourth Edition O S map of 1933. in 1968, two storey nursing home additions were made to the west, to both north and south, by the firm of Dalgliesh and Co. to provide purpose-built nursing home accommodation and the original house was refurbished at that time.
STATEMENT OF IMPORTANCE: An early C19 Greek Revival style house, little altered externally and retaining some original fittings. It was built as a country retreat for the nationally important figure Sir Edward Banks, of the firm of Banks and Jolliffe, perhaps the largest contractors of public engineering works of the time. It is the only one of Banks surviving houses to be specially built for him and is situated near to two of his most important projects, Sheerness Naval Dockyard and his speculative development called Banks town, later Sheerness-on-sea.
SOURCES: Dictionary of National Biography entry on Sir Edward Banks.
SheernessME12 3AR30-Jun-78TQ 92927 73284
1259759DANLEY FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseIIDROVE ROAD (East Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Danley Farmhouse TQ 97 SW 12/154
Early C18. 2 storeys and attic, weatherboarded, with half-hipped tile roof with 2 hipped dormers. 3 windows, hung sashes with glazing bars, over 2, lead drips. Centre stack rebuilt. Modern door.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3JF30-Jun-78TQ 93456 73032
1273264PARSONAGE FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIIPARSONAGE CHASE (South Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Parsonage Farmhouse TQ 97 SW 12/155 27.6.63.
2 parallel ranges. The back range is early-mid C17. 2 storeys in red brick with tiled roof. Stringcourse. Gable at the south end containing an attic window of 2 lights with a brick mullion. Blind gabled projection on the south wall probably containing the staircase. The front range is C18. 2 storeys in red brick with cornice and parapet. 4 windows, hung sashes with glazing bars. 1 window of 3 lights. Brick voussoirs. Doorway with wood pilasters, projecting cornice and door of 6 moulded panels. C19 addition of 2 windows to the north, gabled.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3LX27-Jun-63TQ 93921 72306
1273489THE ABBEY CHURCH OF ST MARY AND ST SEXBURGAC12ChurchIHIGH ~REET (North Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness The Abbey Church of St Mary and St Sexburga TQ 97 SE 13/168 27.6.63. A GV
A large building in flint and rubble. A nunnery was founded here. It was burned by the Danes in 855 and rebuilt by Archbishop Corbeuil between 1123 and 1136. It was dissolved in 1539. There remain the conventual and parochial churches standing side by side, the north chancel and nave having been the conventual church and the south chancel and nave the parish church, in the Early English style, with a tower at the west end of the north nave and a south porch. The north half is the oldest portion of the building, with considerable Saxon remains, but the bulk of the building dates from the C13. The tower was added in the C15 but not completed and has a modern wood belfry. The east end of the north chancel dates from 1581, when St Katherine’s Chapel beyond it was demolished. The south porch dates from 1879-81, when the whole church was restored from ruins by Christian. Late C14 screen. C12 column sculpture of the Virgin and Child. Monuments of the C14 and C15.
Revision Number: 2
A large building in flint and rubble. A nunnery was founded here. It was burned by the Danes in 855 and rebuilt by Archbishop Corbeuil between 1123 and 1136. It was dissolved in 1539. There remain the conventual and parochial churches standing side by side, the north chancel and nave having been the conventual church and the south chancel and nave the parish church, in the Early English style, with a tower at the west end of the north nave and a south porch. The north half is the oldest portion of the building, with considerable Saxon remains, but the bulk of the building dates from the C13. The tower was added in the C15 but not completed and has a modern wood belfry. The east end of the north chancel dates from 1581, when St Katherine’s Chapel beyond it was demolished. The south porch dates from 1879-81, when the whole church was restored from ruins by Christian. Late C14 screen. C12 column sculpture of the Virgin and Child. Monuments of the C14 and C15.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3QD27-Jun-63TQ 95607 72985
1259757MILL HILL HOUSEC18HouseIICHEQUERS ROAD (South Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Mill Hill House
C18. 2 storeys in red brick, all headers, with window dressings and quotas of brighter red brick. Stringcourse. Cornice and parapet. Tiled roof, end stacks. 5 windows, segmental heads, over 4, wood architraves. Modern porch.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3QN27-Jun-63TQ 96420 72712
125806849, CHAPEL STREETC18BuildingIICHAPEL STREET (South Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness No 49 TQ 97 SE 13/166
C18. 2 storeys, rendered, with half-hipped tiled mansard roof. 2 windows, hung sashes with glazing bars, some replaced. Door under gabled hood.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3QQ30-Jun-78TQ 95873 72917
1258796ILLOGANC16CottageIIOAK LANE (East Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Illogan TQ 97 SE 13/159
Formerly Rose Cottage. Early-mid C16. 2 storeys, rendered, with hipped tile roof. 4 windows, Victorian casements with Gothick glazing. Band at 1st floor cills. Fire plaque. Trellis porch to door. Interior has side purlin roof, original chimney and inglenook fireplace. Exposed square framing to rear, in the lean-to.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3QR30-Jun-78TQ 96778 73152
1258870NEATS COURTC18BuildingIIQUEENBOROUGH ROAD (North Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Neats Court TQ 97 SW 12/151
Probably the second half of the C18. 2 storeys in red brick with tile roof and modillion eaves cornice. Stacks at gable ends. 3 windows, the centre with elliptical-arched head with red brick voussoirs. 2 windows to ground floor. Hung sashes with glazing bars. Wood doorway up 3 steps has pilasters, projecting cornice and rectangular fanlight with ornamental glazing. Door of 6 fielded panels. Panelled reveals. Wood garden fence with spade heads to palings, wood gate.
Queenborough CPME12 3RH30-Jun-78TQ 92186 71587
1258878SCOCLES COURTC18BuildingIISCOCLES ROAD (West Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Scocles Court TQ 97 SE 13/156 27.6.63.
Early C18. 2 storeys; attic in red brick with hipped tile roof with 2 hipped dormers with hung sashes and glazing bars. 3 windows, the centre blocked, hung sashes with glazing bars. 2 windows to ground floor. Imported Roman Ionic columned porch with cornice but no entablature. Door of 6 panels, 2 glazed. Mounting block adjoining the garden wall.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3RU30-Jun-78TQ 95015 71958
1243080BARN ADJOINING CATTLE SHED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF KINGS HILL FARMHOUSEC18BarnIIThe following buildings shall be added to the list:
SWALE ELMLEY TQ 96 NW Elmley Marshes 4/170 Barn and adjoining cattle shed immediately north of Kings Hill Farmhouse
Barn and adjoining cattle shed. Circa late C18. Softwood timber frame reclad in new weather-boards, on low plinth of stone rubble topped in English bond brick. Slate half-hipped roof with black glazed ridge tiles. Plan: 5-bay aisled barn with opposed entrances to threshing floor in wider central bay. Adjoining at right angles on south east corner is a single storey 11-bay cattle shed. Exterior: At centre of both north and south sides the wagon entrances have hipped midstrey canopies supported on straight braces; the south entrance is blocked and has small doorways to its left and right. Adjoining at right angles to the right (south east) of south front a long open-fronted 11-bay cattle shed with chamfered wooden posts on stone bases and short curved braces to the arcade plates, slate roof with gable end boarded in and back wall of stone rubble and some flint, the top courses in Flemish bond brick. Interior: vertically studded walls with midrails and straight braces. Aisle-posts and arcade posts have jowled heads with hollow chamfers. Straight braces from the arcade posts to the arcade plates and tie-beams; queen posts and collars above with diagonally set clasped purlins. There are also inter- mediate collars. The principal and common rafters are all intact and there is no ridge-piece or ridgeboard. Above the aisle ties there are diagonal struts. The cattle shed has C19 machine-sawn tie-beam trusses with queen struts and a boarded soffit.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3RW23-Feb-89TQ 93862 67985
1258073KINGSHILL FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIIElmley Sheerness Kingshill Farmhouse TQ 96 SW 15/145
This house derives its name from the fact that James II was brought here by Sir Edward Hales on 12 December 1688, when he was trying to escape from England, before being apprehended on the River Swale. The present house, however, is of a later date. The north wing has the date 1757 scratched on a brick. 2 storeys and attic in red brick with tiled roof with 3 hipped dormers and modillion eaves cornice. 3 windows, casements to 1st floor, hung sashes with glazing bars to ground floor. Doorway with flat hood on brackets. The south wing is C19, buff bricks.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 3RW30-Jun-78TQ 93868 67909
1391502FOUR HANGARSC20Aircraft HangarsIIEASTCHURCH
933/0/10011 HMP STANFORD HILL (FORMER RAF EASTCHUR 01-DEC-05 CH) Four Hangars
Aircraft hangars. 1912, built by the engineers Harbrows for the Admiralty. Steel-framed, with stanchions at 10 ft centres; lower sections of party walls separating hangars and the same stratum of their front elevation are of coarse concrete blocks; corrugated iron cladding; all roofs are of felt on timber boarding.
PLAN: two end-opening paired sheds, each of 60 x 70 ft, built in-line as two semi-detached units, with a central linking annexe.
EXTERIOR: plain, the full-width front doors partly infilled.
INTERIOR: steel trusses, portal-braced to front, with timber trusses to central annexe.
HISTORY: Ashworth records that the facilities were expanded in February 1912, when ten acres of ground close to the Club sheds were leased and work on six new sheds and 3 portable hangars commenced. These hangars are shown on a plan of December 1912 (PRO ADM 116/1292) and were built as part of the Navy’s expansion of Eastchurch as a training base. These are of a larger (50 ft) span and length to four sheds identified at a similar (but not the same) position on a Royal Aero Club site plan dated June 1910. There are other structures at Eastchurch dating from the First World War period.
Eastchurch, together with Larkhill in Wiltshire, is one of the two sites in Britain where aircraft sheds built in association with the early pioneers of powered flight (1910 at Larkhill and 1912 at Eastchurch) have survived. They are amongst the most historically significant structures associated with the pioneering phase of powered flight to have survived anywhere in Europe or America: there are other structures at Eastchurch dating from the First World War period, in addition to the altered mess building of 1912. Flying at Eastchurch – now the site of an open prison – began in July 1909, when C.S. Rolls used Standford Hill for tests of his glider, designed and built by the pioneer Short brothers at their nearby Leysdown works. Griffith Brewer had selected the Golf Course at Shellbeach, Leysdown, on behalf of the Wrights who were licensing Short Brothers to build their Flyer. Shorts, who were the Aeronautical engineers to the Aero Club, then acquired Leysdown, whose golf course was turned by Frank McLean into an airfield for Aero Club members: the clubhouse is listed grade II. McLean, acting on behalf of the Aero Club, then acquired the new site at Eastchurch. From May 1910 Eastchurch became a fashionable centre for aviation pioneers, and by September of that year there were 18 sheds rented by now-famous pioneers such as Moore-Brabazon, C S Rolls and Tom Sopwith. In November 1910 the Royal Aero Club offered the site’s facilities to the military for training purposes, whose facilities were expanded over the next two years. In 1911 Eastchurch hosted the Gordon Bennett Air Race, held at Rheims in 1909 and New York in 1910.
After the formation of the Royal Flying Corps in April 1912, the Senior Officer Sheerness and Naval Flying School’s commander, Captain Godfrey Paine RN, was nominated as the Commandant of the Central Flying School at Upavon in Wiltshire and Eastchurch was established as the Naval Wing HQ. The aerodrome became known as HMS Pembroke II (after the naval barracks next to Chatham naval dockyard), and after the formation of the Royal Naval Air Service in July 1914 naval landplanes were sent to Eastchurch for mobilisation. In addition to its key role in training naval pilots, the base’s War Flight – reinforced by the RFC’s No 4 Squadron – became responsible for the defence of the naval dockyards at Chatham and Sheerness: this function continued until 1917. The RNAS, in the forefront of the development of military aviation as a strategic force, conducted the official trials of the Handley Page 0/100 bomber on this site.
Expansion in 1916 and 1917 resulted by November 1918 in a 600-acre site at Eastchurch, with a diverse range of 29 hangars. It became the Armament and Gunnery School on April 1 1922, renamed the Air Armament School in 1932: this function moved to Manby in Lincolnshire in August 1938, Eastchurch being transferred to Coastal Command in November of that year. The base was used to mount raids on shipping and barge concentrations in German-occupied ports, until a series of severe raids put the airfield largely out of action from September 1940 to June 1942. It became an unofficial landing ground for battle-damaged USAAF fighters and bombers during 1943-4, and after 1950 the airfield returned to agriculture and the Home Office converted the buildings into an open prison.
(Chris Ashworth, Action Stations 9. Military airfields of the Central South and South-East, (Wellingborough, 1985, pp. 88-94. Air Commodore Bill Croydon, Early Birds. A short history of how flight came to Sheppey, (Sheppey Heritage Trust, c1999)
Eastchurch CPME12 4AA01-Dec-05TQ 97992 69831
1258506PARADISE FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseIILEYSDOWN ROAD (South Side) Leysdown-on-Sea, Sheerness Paradise Farmhouse TR 07 SW 14/149
2 parallel ranges. The west range is C18. 2 storeys in red brick with modern asbestos tile roof, hipped. 2 windows, modern casements. The east range is C19, with a slate roof. Plain doorways.
Leysdown CPME12 4AB30-Jun-78TR 02285 70351
1258074PARK FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseIIHARTY FERRY ROAD (East Side) Harty, Sheerness Park Farmhouse TR 06 NW 17/148 27.6.63.
Probably C16 timber-framed building refaced with painted brick. Hipped tile roof with slightly sprocketed eaves. Stringcourse. 2 storeys and attics. 1 hipped dormer. 3 casement windows. Small modern porch. Buttress at the south-east corner.
Leysdown CPME12 4BQ27-Jun-63TR 01719 66233
1258076CHURCH OF ST THOMAS THE APOSTLEC11ChurchII*933/17/146 HARTY FERRY ROAD 27-JUN-63 HARTY (East side) CHURCH OF ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE (Formerly listed as: HARTY FERRY ROAD HARTY CHURCH OF ST THOMAS)
The nave is C11 or early C12 in origin. The N aisle was added c.1200 and the chancel built or rebuilt around the same time. The S porch is also C13. The church was renovated in the late C14 or early C15, when the windows were redone, the buttresses added, the N chapel added, and the S chapel added or rebuilt. Some earlier elements, including the chancel windows and the arch to the S chapel may have been reset at this time. The church was restored in 1878-80 by Joseph Clarke, and has had some C20 restoration.
MATERIALS: Stone rubble, mostly ragstone but also including some tufa, septaria and flint. Tiled roofs, Timber weatherboarded bellcot.
PLAN: Nave and chancel without structural division, N aisle, N chancel chapel, N porch, S nave chapel. Small belfry over W end of nave.
EXTERIOR A small, low church. The nave and chancel roof ridge line is continuous, but the roofs are all distinct. The N aisle is roofed with the nave and has a catslide roof coming down too low for windows. The N chapel is taller with a low pitched roof and two-light Perpendicular windows; the S chapel is similar, but somewhat smaller. Gabled N porch with C13 outer opening. There is a massive offset buttress in the centre of the W wall, with two further offset buttresses of differing forms on the S nave wall and on the S chapel. Perpendicular windows on either side of the central W buttress. Blocked S nave door with a four-centred head, and one Perpendicular two-light window in the S nave wall and another in the S chapel. Chancel E window is Perpendicular, but there is a C12 round-headed window in the N wall, and a similar window in the S wall with a square-headed low-side window to the west of it. Small weather boarded belfry over the W end of the nave. INTERIOR The C12 origins of the church are more clearly apparent inside. There is no chancel arch, but the mid C14 screen stands in its original position. Door and stair to former rood loft in the N wall. The door cuts an earlier aumbry recess. There is a fine, late C14 image niche in the chancel. The S chapel opens through a C12 arch on chamfered imposts, possibly the chancel arch reset. The two bay N arcade of c.1200 has plain pointed arches and chamfered arches; the central pier is formed from a length of walling, and has a partial, blocked C12 window above it. Simple late C14 or C15 chamfered arches to the N chapel. The bellcot is supported by a massive, probably C15, frame at the W end of the church that has corner posts with diagonal and crossed braces.
PRINCIPAL FIXTURES Rood screen of c.1350-75 with square-headed lights with ogee tracery, plain lower panels, and a moulded cornice. The screen goes around the N chapel E respond with original, plain panelling, and then continues across the N chapel. The loft is lost. Fine late C14 image niche in the chancel with a nodding ogee, gabled and pinnacled frame has traces of paint on the back. It stands on a C19 corbel. Another image niche in the S chapel, and a partial, rebated aumbry in the N chapel. A very fine chest or ‘Flemish Kist’ of c.1375 carved with a battle scene. Following the theft, and return, of this chest in 1987, a delicate metal screen to close the S chapel was installed.
The N and S chapels have late medieval low pitched roofs with moulded beams. C19 roofs in nave and chancel, the nave roof with crown posts. C19 timber pulpit with open tracery panels based on the screen. Very plain C19 nave benches.
Only a few monuments, including two brasses, one in the nave for Habram Fare, d.1512, the other C17 inscription in the N chapel. Very good late C19 and C20 glass, notably a late C20 window of grazing sheep and another with an owl. There are two pieces of medieval glass in the W windows. Royal arms of George II.
SUBSIDIARY FEATURES Three good chest tombs in the churchyard.
HISTORY Harty is now very isolated, and has little settlement, but it was once more important as a crossing point of the Swale, with a ferry in use until 1946. Harty the place is mentioned in the Domesday book of 1086, but there is no record of a church at that date, but this does not necessarily mean that one did not exist as many churches were omitted from Domesday book. The earliest fabric is C11 or early C12, and as was common, the church was extended with a N aisle and larger chancel at the end of the C12 or the beginning of the C13. The chancel was renovated or refurnished in the late C14. The screen is dated to c.1350-75, and the Flemish chest to c.1375. The image niche, with its nodding ogee arch, is probably contemporary. The N and S chapels are of a similar date, although it is possible that the S chapel, entered through a C12 arch, was rebuilt at this time. Like most medieval parish churches, Harty was restored in the C19. The architect, George Austin, was the Canterbury diocesan architect.
SOURCES Pevsner, N., Buildings of England, North-East and East Kent (1977), 343-4 Lambeth Palace Library, Incorporated Church Building Society, file 08322. St Thomas the Apostle, Harty: Guidebook (1999)
Leysdown CPME12 4BQ27-Jun-63TR 02313 66279
1258222FERRY HOUSE INNC18Public HouseIIHARTY FERRY ROAD (West Side) Harty, Sheerness Ferry House Inn TR 06 NW 17/147
C18. 2 storeys, rendered, with tile roof. 5 windows, modern glazing. Large modern porch. 2 stacks. A series of gables to road elevation.
Leysdown CPME12 4BQ30-Jun-78TR 01524 65948
1258505THE RUINS OF SHURLAND HALL OR CASTLEC16Hall HouseII*LEYSDOWN ROAD (East Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness The Ruins of Shurland Hall or Castle TQ 97 SE 13/144 14.5.52.
Built by Sir Thomas Cheney during the reign of Henry VIII partly of materials said to have been brought from Chilham Castle on the mainland of Kent, and then consisting of several courtyards. The portion that remains faces west. 2 storeys. Red brick with a diaper pattern of grey headers on a stone base. 6 windows, hung sashes with the remains of glazing bars but all the glass missing. The 2 centre window bays are flanked by octagonal turrets of 3 storeys each, which have stone quoins and castellated parapets. Within these at the north end is a tall and wide 4-centred stone doorway with dripstone, carved spandrels and an iron-studded door. 1 small ground floor window to the south of the main doorway is a former doorway. On each side of the turrets are 2 windows on the 1st floor and 1 window on the ground floor. Brick buttress at the south end. Projection at the north end with stone quoins, but now half collapsed. Part of the wing behind it, which is of stone, still remains. The east front has 4 casement windows of 2 lights, each with 4-centred heads, stone mullions and dripstones. Wide 4-centred stone doorway. To the east is a courtyard enclosed with the remains of a building to ground floor height, of red brick on the north side and of stone on the east side. Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn were entertained here on 7 October 1532, so the house was probably complete before that date.
Eastchurch CPME12 4DA14-May-52TQ 99421 71550
1273309THE GARDEN WALLS OF SHURLAND HALL OR CASTLENAWallIILEYSDOWN ROAD (East Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness 27.6.63 The garden walls of Shurland Hall or Castle TQ 97 SE 13/144A
These are contemporary with the house (qv). They form a complete rectangle to the south of the house, the west side having a series of buttresses. There are also some remains to the north and north-east.
Eastchurch CPME12 4DA27-Jun-63TQ 99441 71498
127352122 AND 24, HIGH STREETC18BuildingIIHIGH STREET (South Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Nos 22 and 24 TQ 97 SE 13/141
Early C18. 2 storeys, weatherboarded with rendering to side. Tiled mansard roof, raised to rear. 2 windows, hung sashes with glazing bars, most later. Plain door to No 22; door to No 24 to side.
Eastchurch CPME12 4DA30-Jun-78TQ 99121 71409
1258070PARSONAGE FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIICHURCH ROAD (West Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Parsonage Farmhouse TQ 97 SE 13/132 14.5.52.
This house was built in the early C17 by Gabriel Livesey (died 1622), the father of Sir Michael Livesey, the regicide. 2 storeys and attic, red brick. 2 small hipped dormers to tile roof, hipped and with pentice behind. 4 windows. Doorway with pilasters and projecting cornice.
Eastchurch CPME12 4DQ14-May-52TQ 98631 70925
1259758GARDEN WALLS TO PARSONAGE FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIICHURCH ROAD (West Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Garden walls to Parsonage Farmhouse TQ 97 SE 13/132A
C17 red brick garden walls to front of Parsonage Farmhouse.
Eastchurch CPME12 4DQ30-Jun-78TQ 98632 70967
1258069Memorial to ‘The Home of Aviation’C20MemorialII*Memorial unveiled in 1955 commemorating the Royal Aero Club of Great Britain flying grounds at Leysdown and Eastchurch (from 1909) and the first Royal Navy aviators based at Eastchurch from 1911. Portland stone with integral seating. Designed by Sidney Loweth FRIBA, sculpted by Hilary Stratton FRBS.
Attracted by the novel and exciting experience of ballooning, in 1901 Frank Hedges Butler, Vera Butler, and Charles Rolls formed an Aero Club which rapidly attracted an enthusiastic membership. The Wright brothers’ success in powered aircraft flight in 1903 in America then inspired the Club’s members to adopt this new, experimental, technology. In the short period before the First World War, much of Britain’s early success in heavier-than-air flight can be attributed to the group, which in 1910 became the Royal Aero Club.
In 1909 Griffith Brewer, a balloonist and agent for Wright Brothers, identified land at Leysdown on the Isle of Sheppey (Kent) for a Flying Ground. As well as recommending that the Aero Club adopt this as a club aerodrome, he suggested that Short Brothers locate assembly sheds and flight testing there in order to operate their production licence to build the Wright ‘Flyer’. Frank McClean bought the flying rights for the Club and, with its clubhouse at Mussel Manor (Grade II), thus provided facilities which in short order enabled a number of British aviation ‘firsts’ to be achieved: including the first flight in Britain by a Briton, when JTC Moore-Brabazon (Royal Aero Club certificate 1) flew in his Voisin at the ground.
Leysdown was not ideal and in May 1910 Short Brothers moved the factory the short distance to Standford Hill, immediately south of Eastchurch. Charles Rolls had already conducted test flights here, in 1909. The new and highly-fashionable Flying Ground was established when McClean bought 400 acres for the Club. Eastchurch is now one of only two locations where aircraft sheds built by early aviation pioneers survive (Grade II-listed at Eastchurch, 1912, and Grade II*-listed at Larkhill, Wiltshire, 1910).
In November 1910 the Club offered free flying instruction for Royal Navy officers. Four men were trained by Horace Short and George Cobham and in October 1911 the Admiralty was persuaded to set up a Flying School at the aerodrome. These facilities expanded during 1912 and when the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was formed on 13 April 1912, Eastchurch became the Headquarters of the RFC Naval Wing. When the Royal Naval Air Service was created on 1 July 1914, the Eastchurch Squadron was formed on station. Flying training, experimental flying, and aircraft testing continued during the First World War until, after the creation of the Royal Air Force on 1 April 1918, flying activity decreased from 1919.
The intense and inspirational period of pre-First World War aviation innovation on the Isle of Sheppey attracted great public interest both at the time and in subsequent years. In 1950, Sir Winston Churchill, Lord Brabazon of Tara (as Moore-Brabazon had become), and Horace Short, wrote to the Editor of The Times appealing for support to create a memorial at Eastchurch, marking these historic successes. They reported that a public meeting (held locally in 1949) had resolved to establish a museum or library in a new extension to Eastchurch village hall. They also called for memorabilia of the pre-war period to be gifted, with the aim of celebrating the Royal Aero Club’s achievements, Short Brothers’ first factory, and the place where the first officers had been taught to fly aircraft (before even the formation of the RFC).
In the event, the memorial committee decided that a commemorative monument would best serve and Sidney Loweth FRIBA agreed to provide the design. The memorial was executed by Hilary Stratton ARBS, and built by Messrs Wallis and Sons Ltd (Maidstone). The location was selected with reference to the roads towards the original Flying Grounds (Leysdown some 6km to the east, and Eastchurch approximately 2km to the south). The parish church opposite includes a memorial window (1912) to Charles Stewart Rolls and Cecil Stanley Grace, the first British aviators to die in flying accidents involving aircraft (both men flew from Eastchurch Flying Ground and are named on the Aviation memorial); whilst the nearby lych gate is the community First World War memorial.
The ‘Home of Aviation’ memorial was unveiled on 25 July 1955 by Lord Tedder, former Chief of the Air Service. Lord Brabazon and Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Longmore (one of the original group of four Naval officers trained by the Aero Club) spoke at the ceremony of their memories of Eastchurch in those pioneering days.
Sidney Loweth FSA FRIBA (d1977) was the Architect for Kent County Council. Hilary Stratton FRBS, who had been an Assistant to Eric Gill, also worked with Sidney Loweth on the Men of Kent (Norman Invasion) memorial at Swanscombe, unveiled in 1958.
Memorial monument at the junction of High Street and Church Road, Eastchurch.. Unveiled in 1955, the memorial was designed by Sidney Loweth and sculpted by Hilary Stratton.
MATERIALS: brick, Portland stone ashlar, Kentish ragstone, with timber seating, flint cobbles, and glass setts.
DESCRIPTION: the memorial stands on the west side of Church Road, at the junction with High Street, opposite the Church of All Saints (Grade I-listed) and the war memorial lych gate (unlisted).
It takes the form of a curved wall with Portland stone ashlar, facing east. The central section comprises a plinth supporting the bust of Zeus who holds a sceptre and lightning bolt, against a backdrop of clouds. To either side of the plinth the flanking walls continue to end piers. To the front of the flanking walls, the Kentish ragstone base supports built-in wooden seating with Portland stone bench ends. A cobbled pavement fronts the seating with, in front of the central plinth, a Portland stone kerb marking out an area, paved in blue glass setts, for the placement of floral tributes.
The southern flanking wall is at one height, simply coped. Its end pier supports a ball finial in the form of a globe, surrounded by navigation instruments. The pier ends in a pilaster topped with an aircraft wheel carved in relief. This pilaster carries the sculptor’s signature. The inscription at the southern end of the wall reads FRANK MCCLEAN (LATER SIR/ FRANCIS MCCLEAN) LEASED/ STONEPITTS FARM TO THE/ AERO CLUB FOR A NOMINAL/ RENT 1909. HE ALSO PROVIDED/ AEROPLANES FREE OF CHARGE/ FOR THE FIRST NAVAL OFFICERS/ TO BE INSTRUCTED IN AVIATION/ 1911.
A series of eight early aircraft are carved in relief along the face of the wall, each named and dated. These include an Avro Triplane, the Cody 1, a De Havilland No 1 biplane, a Howard Wright 1909 biplane, the Dunne D.5 experimental biplane, a Bristol Aeroplane of 1911, a Handley Page Type E monoplane, and a Sopwith-Wright biplane.
The central plinth is in three vertical sections, the middle of which projects forward. The principal dedication is recorded on the middle section, reading THIS MEMORIAL/ COMMEMORATES/ THE FIRST HOME OF/ BRITISH AVIATION/ 1909/ NEAR THIS SPOT AT/ LEYSDOWN EASTCHURCH/ (MUSSEL MANOR) (STONEPITTS FARM)/ FLIGHTS AND EXPERIMENTS WERE/ MADE BY MEMBERS OF THE AERO/ CLUB (LATER ROYAL) OF GREAT BRITAIN/ ALSO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE/ FIRST AIRCRAFT FACTORY IN GREAT/ BRITAIN BY SHORT BROTHERS 1909/ AND THE FORMATION OF THE FIRST/ ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE STATION. Below this is incised an image of a Short Flying Boat.
The inscription on the left-hand section reads AVIATORS/ J.T.C. MOORE BRABAZON/ THE HON CHARLES ROLLS/ FRANK K. MCCLEAN/ PROF A.K. HUNTINGDON/ LIEUT JAMES W. DUNNE/ THE HON MAURICE-EGERTON/ T.O.M. SOPWITH/ CECIL GRACE/ ALEC OGILVIE/ PERCY GRACE/ ERNEST PITMAN/ G.P.L. JEZZI/ JAMES L. TRAVERS/ AND OTHERS.
To the right, the inscription reads DESIGNERS AND/ CONSTRUCTORS/ HORACE SHORT/ EUSTACE SHORT/ OSWALD SHORT/ AND THE CRAFTSMEN/ OF SHEPPEY/ ROYAL NAVAL/ AIR SERVICE/ LT CDR C.R. SAMPSON RN/ LIEUT A.M. LONGMORE RN/ LIEUT R. GREGORY RN/ CAPT E.L. GERRARD RMLI/ AND TWELVE RN/ TECHNICAL RATINGS.
The northern flanking wall is stepped, raking down to the north. Its end pier supports a finial in the form of an aviator’s bust, fully-dressed in flying gear including breathing apparatus. The pier ends in a pilaster topped with an aircraft wheel carved in relief. A series of seven early aircraft are carved in relief along the face of this wall, including a Short biplane, a Short seaplane, the Short Twin, a Short S38, a Short S27, the Short No2 (built for Moore Brabazon ), and the Short No1 (built for McClean). The inscription at the northern end of the wall reads FIRST CONTROLLED AEROPLANE FLIGHT/ IN GREAT BRITAIN BY A BRITISH SUB-/ JECT 2ND MAY 1909 AND THE FIRST/ CIRCULAR FLIGHT OF ONE MILE IN A/ BRITISH AEROPLANE DESIGNED AND/ CONSTRUCTED BY SHORT BROS 30TH/ OCTOBER 1909 BOTH FLIGHTS WERE/ MADE BY J.T.C. MOORE BRABAZON/ (LATER LORD BRABAZON OF TARA).
Eastchurch CPME12 4EH30-Jun-78TQ 98832 71385
1273063RECTORYC19RectoryIIHIGH STREET 1 Eastchurch 5282 Rectory TQ 97 SE
2/169
Rectory. c1835 Gothic Style. Built of stock brick with slate roof stone dressings and brick or cemented chimney stacks. L-shaped building of 2 storeys 3 windows on principal elevation. This has projecting central gable with stone kneelers and plaque with crest. Central 3 light oriel window flanked by 2 light cambered sashes, with right hand 3-light sash to ground floor. Central stone arched doorcase with hood moulding and shields in spandrels, double door with arched panelled wooden door with blank shields and side lights behind and 3 steps. Right side elevation has 2 paired cambered sash windows with glazing bars. Left side elevation has 2 cambered sashes with Gothic glazing and sawtooth cornice. Clustered square brick chimney stacks. Good interior of the period with arches and four panelled doors to staircase hall, staircase with turned wooden balusters and chamfered newel posts with finials and pendants. Dining room and Drawing room with elaborate plaster cornice and kitchen with wooden corner cupboard with serpentine shelves.
Eastchurch CPME12 4EH05-Dec-86TQ 98795 71439
12731272, WARDEN ROADC18BuildingIIWARDEN ROAD (West Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness No 2 TQ 97 SE 13/143
C18. 2 storeys, weatherboarded, with hipped Welsh slate roof. 3 windows to 1st floor, C19 casements, the ground floor having sashes without glazing bars. Wood plain door. 2 windows to rear elevation, hung sashes with glazing bars.
Eastchurch CPME12 4EH30-Jun-78TQ 98869 71460
1273520CHURCH OF ALL SAINTSC15ChurchIEASTCHURCH
933/13/130 HIGH STREET 27-JUN-1963 (North side) CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS
Church. Rebuilt 1431-2 after the previous church fell into ruin. Pevsner suggests that the 2-light Decorated windows at the W end are reused. Chancel roof repaired after fire damage of 1922. Said to have been designed by William Nudds, a Cistercian monk of Boxley and built by lay brothers from Boxley Abbey. One major Perpendicular building campaign. MATERIALS: Kent ragstone rubble with knapped flint merlons to the embattled parapets and chequered flint and stone parapet to the tower; buttresses with knapped flint panels; lead roof. PLAN: West tower with west porch, nave, chancel, north and south aisles; north porch; north east organ chamber; south east chapel; north vestry.
EXTERIOR: Grand externally with deep battlemented parapets throughout above a moulded stringcourse. Diagonal buttresses to aisles, chancel and tower. Aisle windows mostly 2-light with shallow segmental heads and cusped lights, stonework much renewed; similar 5-light east window. Decorated style 2-light windows at west end of north aisle with quatrefoils in the heads. The porch is similar to the medieval north vestry. Shallow embattled west porch with a medieval west doorway. 3-stage west tower with 2-light medieval windows matching those of the aisles. North east porch with renewed Clipsham stone outer doorway. INTERIOR: Porch has late medieval roof. Arcades with octagonal piers with concave sides, moulded capitals and arches. Wide chancel arch to match. Handsome shallow pitched C15 nave roof, an unusual design for Kent, with moulded tie beams with short curved braces springing from carved timber angel corbels holding shields. The roof is divided into large panels by moulded ribs with carved bosses and half bosses at the intersections and central bosses of very large winged angels holding shields. The chancel roof is similar, with 3 bays: the post 1922 repair is difficult to identify from the ground. Aisle roofs are similar but plainer, the braces on plain stone corbels. Double-chamfered tower arch on moulded corbels. Tower was intended to be stone vaulted and preserves the corbels and first courses of vaults in the corners. 11-bay chancel screen, the full width of nave and aisles with wide bays flanking the central entrance. The screen has lost its rood loft and has been extensively repaired. No reredos. North and south hagioscopes (squints) to chancel. South east chapel lined with unusually lavish Jacobean 2-tier panelling: similar panelling in the tower. The panelling originated from the former Cathedral of St Martin at Ypres.
SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: Choir stalls with elaborately-shaped ends and poppyhead finials. Square-headed bench ends with recessed panels to nave benches. Plain octagonal stone font on moulded stem and base. Early C17 timber drum pulpit on a probably later bracketed stem, the sides of the drum decorated with strapwork and field panels. Two George II brass candelabra. Monuments include, on the south side of the chancel a fine alabaster chest tomb with effigies commemorating Sir Gabriel Livesay, d.1622 and his second wife, Anne. An African’s head is incorporated into the design. Marble monument on the north wall of the chancel to Vice Admiral Sir Richard King who captained HMS Achilles at the Battle of Trafalgar. Several late C19 stained glass windows. 1912 window by Karl Parsons Charles Stewart Rolls (of Rolls Royce) and Cecil Stanley Grace who died in a flying accident in 1910.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: The church is an outstanding example of a Perpendicular church, built largely in one phase in 1431-2. It has six medieval roofs, the nave and chancel of unusual design for Kent. Fittings of interest include a rood screen and monuments.
Sources. Pevsner, North East and East Kent, 1983, 303-304 www.fsearle.freeserve.co.uk/Allsaints_history.html
Eastchurch CPME12 4EH27-Jun-63TQ 98835 71422
1445810Fletcher BatteryC20BatteryIIA First World War Coastal Gun Battery built in 1917, and extended during the Second World War.
Fletcher Battery in Eastchurch was constructed in 1917 and designed to work in conjunction with the Victorian Barton’s Point Battery, located a few miles further west. The combined objective was to protect the Sheerness Dockyard from German sea-borne attack. The battery is named after Sir Richard Fletcher (Baronet) (1768-1813), who is remembered for constructing the Lines of Torres Vedras between the Atlantic and Lisbon under great secrecy in 1810. He used the natural lie of the land, clearing all vegetation and constructing multiple lines of defence, all controlled by a system of flag signals. Neither Napoleon nor even the British Government were aware of the defences until Wellington utilised them later the following year. Fletcher died in action at San Sebastian on 31st August 1813, and he is commemorated on a plaque at Fletcher Battery.
The battery is situated north of Eastchurch, approximately 200m from the cliff edge, and was initially configured for two 9.2 inch breech-loader MK X guns in barbetted mountings (a protective circular armour support for a heavy gun). The guns were relocated from Slough Fort, Allhallows (National Heritage List for England reference 1393526, listed at Grade II*). They stood behind a concrete revetment which housed a tunnel probably connecting them with machine gun posts to the east and west. Aiming and elevation was determined via a Bar and Stroud rangefinder. Behind the gun emplacements there was a long linear temporary ammunition store, connected to the gun emplacements by a light railway. The wider site was protected by a diamond shaped ditch which is no longer extant.
After the First World War the site was selected for permanent retention in 1920, and at some time before the Second World War, barrack rooms were constructed outside the site perimeter to the south-west. By the Second World War, the battery was enlarged with the addition of a third gun emplacement to the east. The temporary ammunition stores were replaced by two larger subterranean stores. The one to the south-west of the site was connected to the two original guns by a light railway. The example to the east was built to serve the third emplacement, which also had the benefit of an adjacent hardened operations building. The combined site was now controlled by a new observation building built into the east end of the original revetment and connected by a tunnel to the original emplacements, and by a covered walkway to the third emplacement. A 29mm mortar was also added to the north-west of the site for close protection from a cliff assault.
During the Second World War the battery was used for counter-bombardment and after the addition of the third gun in 1943, was used for night time long-range fire, probably in conjunction with the Red Sand Fort which is located towards the middle of the Thames estuary.
The 9.2-inch gun retained its importance in British coastal defence for more than fifty years until the mid-C20. However, by the early 1950s the decision was made that aircraft and guided missiles were more effective in addressing an invasion, or long-range attacks. Fletcher Battery was disarmed in 1953 and all guns removed a year later. In the later part of the C20 the site became a static caravan park. The south-west ammunition store is no longer extant and the caravan site clubhouse now stands on its base. Some metal fixtures and fittings have been removed from the gun emplacements, and the Second World War example has been temporarily converted to a garage by the addition of a late-C20 wall and timber roof. The eastern ammunition store has had its earth covering removed, exposing the concrete construction and access shafts.
A First World War Coastal Gun Battery built in 1917, and extended for the Second World War.
MATERIALS: shuttered concrete, with iron fittings.
PLAN: the First World War battery has two north facing gun emplacements set in to a revetment.
At the eastern end of the revetment there is a former fire control building. To the east and west there are machine gun pillboxes. Behind the battery there are the remains of temporary ammunition store, and a power supply building. To the north-east of the site there is a Second World War gun emplacement and ancillary building. Also from this period, to the south-east of the site there is freestanding ammunition store with two access shafts, and to the far west of the site there is a spigot mortar mounting.
First World War
The two gun emplacements survive as semi-circular concrete structures set in to a concrete revetment. There are some vestigial fixtures such as fixings in the wall for the barbette platform, and hold-fasts (metal fixing bolts or plates for securing the gun mountings). Each retains their shell-shelf and a number of storage lockers. Between the two emplacements there is a section of lower concrete walling above which there are brick steps up to the former gunnery officer position. On top of the revetment and to the east, are the remains of the mount for a Bar & Stroud rangefinder. Access to the brick lined tunnel which connects the site under-ground has been blocked off. The southern face of the revetment is covered with late-C20 timber fencing with wire fencing above. To the west of the revetment a store room delineates the end of the battery. To the east there are two store rooms set into the revetment. They are formed from large concrete blocks, have flat concrete roofs, and replacement late-C20 PVC doors and windows.
To the west and east of the battery there are two sets of machine gun pillboxes. They are constructed of shuttered concrete, circular and in a group of three. The set to the west are mostly covered in an earth bank. The example to the east has a late-C20 single storey concrete store inserted to the south face. All embrasures have been filled-in to prevent access. To the south of the gun emplacements are the remains of the temporary ammunition store. The northern face comprises of an earth bank and the south face is a rendered 2m high wall with all openings blocked. Between the gun emplacements and the ammunition store is a small single-storey power supply building. It is square in plan and has a single access door to the north protected by a semi-circular blast wall. The roof is concrete and gently sloping.
Second World War
At the east end of the revetment there is a concrete two-storey former observation building. The principal and more domestic elevation faces south. The building is rectangular in plan with a projecting hexagonal section to the eastern end, and a gently sloping concrete roof. Access on this elevation is both at first-floor level via a steel external stair, and centrally at ground-floor level in the hexagonal section. There is a stone plaque set into the face of the wall commemorating Sir Richard Fletcher, and all fenestration and doors are late-C20 UPVC replacements. The northern elevation is predominantly blind but has a continuous narrow horizontal strip of replacement UPVC windows just below the roof line. It is assumed that the interior is late-C20 in character and without any military fixtures or fittings. To the east of the observation building there is a concrete topped brick corridor probably designed to give covered access to the eastern machine gun pillbox group, and the Second World War gun emplacement.
At the eastern extremity of the site there is a concrete Second World War gun emplacement. It faces north and has a blast wall to the south. It has ammunition storage lockers inset at ground level, and guide rails inset into the road surface for the blast doors (now removed). To the east of the emplacement there is a set of straight concrete stairs leading up to the top of the revetment. A late-C20 wall has been added to the rear of the emplacement along with a timber flat roof effectively creating a covered store. Inside the emplacement retains its barbette wall fixings, hold-fasts, shell-shelf and storage lockers.
Adjacent, and to the south-east there is a single-storey rectangular ancillary operations building made of concrete block-work and blind to east, north, and south. The west elevation it is broadly symmetrical, and has two access doors set into steel reinforced door frames, the example to the south having an open-sided concrete porch. The rectangular high-set windows also have reinforced frames, and paired steel-shutters. All fenestration and doors are UPVC replacements. To the south of the gun emplacement there is a dedicated ammunition store. It is broadly triangular in plan and is approximately 20m wide on each face. It is dome shaped with the apex approximately 3m above ground level. It is constructed of shuttered concrete, and to the north and west it has free-standing concrete access shafts. The shafts have double steel-doors to the upper section above a chamfered concrete band, and have flat concrete roofs. To the far west of the site there is a cylindrical concrete mortar mounting which is approximately 1m in diameter and 1.5m tall. It has a steel spigot on the top for connection to a 29mm mortar.
Eastchurch CPME12 4ET31-Aug-17TR 00143 72828
1273162WARDEN MANORC16ManorIIWARDEN ROAD (South Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Warden Manor TR 07 SW 14/133 27.6.63.
C16 or early C17, refronted circa 1800. 2 storeys, stuccoed with tiled roof, hipped at the west end. 2 brick stacks. Windows with louvred shutters and hung sashes with glazing bars. Trellised wood porch. Moulded ceiling beams to interior.
Eastchurch CPME12 4HD27-Jun-63TR 01585 72393
1259032HOUSE WITHIN GROUNDS OF WARDEN MANOR AND IN SAME OCCUPANCYC16HouseIIWARDEN ROAD (South Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness House within the grounds of Warden Manor and in the same occupancy TR 07 SW 14/134
Late C16 or early C17 house built as a dependency of Warden Manor. 2 storeys. Gault and red brick exterior, part rendered. Upped tiled roof. Now has 4 windows on both storeys. Exposed timbers to interior, including moulded ceiling beams. Plain door and windows.
Eastchurch CPME12 4HG30-Jun-78TR 01619 72410
1242944BELL FARM PARK HOUSE AND CLUBC15FarmhouseIIBELL FARM LANE (East Side) Minster-on-Sea, Sheerness Bell Farm Park House and Club TQ 97 SE 13/157 22.3.77. (Formerly listed as Bell Farmhouse) II
2 builds, that to the front elevation earlier. 2 storeys, the south range a timber-framed weatherboarded hall house of the late C15 or early Cl6, the 1st floor of its east front oversailing with a gable above, the ground floor rendered. Windows with hung sashes with glazing bars. 2 dormers in tile roof with C17 chimney stack with round-headed arcading. Inside, a crown post roof. The north range is C18 and red brick on the ground floor and tile hung above. A large modern club extension to the ground floor.
Minster-on-Sea CPME12 4JB30-Jun-78TQ 97565 73088
1258797CONNETTSC18BuildingIIPLOUGH ROAD (North Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Connetts TQ 97 SE 13/136
Mid C18. 2 storeys in red brick with parapet and tiled roof. Rendered to rear. 3 windows, gauged brick arches, the centre window shortened, no glazing bars. Modern porch above round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight. One modern window to ground floor. Brick gable ends with stacks.
Eastchurch CPME12 4JL30-Jun-78TQ 98756 72549
1258866TROUTSPre C18BuildingIIPLOUGH ROAD (North-East Side) Eastchurch, Sheerness Trouts TQ 97 SE 13/135
C18 exterior to an older building. 2 storeys. 3 windows, modern hung sashes with glazing bars. Stone band between storeys. Ground floor faced with buff bricks, above with roughcast. Plain doorway. Hipped tiled roof. Modern extension to side.
Eastchurch CPME12 4JN30-Jun-78TQ 99189 72384
1273062MUSWELL MANORC19ManorIIWING ROAD (East Side) Leysdown-on-Sea, Sheerness Muswell Manor TR 06 NW 17/150
Early C19, the rear span possibly older. 2 storeys, rough rendered. Steeply- pitched roof with end stacks. 2 hipped dormers. 4 windows, hung sashes without glazing bars. Modern sun porch to front elevation. Long pentice to rear. Included for historical reasons as the centre used by the Wright brothers, the Short brothers, Lord Brabazon and Mr Rolls while carrying out early flying experiments at Eastchurch.
Leysdown CPME12 4RJ30-Jun-78TR 04309 69371
1069235NORTH EASTLING FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseIIRectory, now house. Early C19. Yellow stock brick and slate roof. Two storeys on plinth with box eaves to hipped roof with stacks to centre left and centre right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 4 on ground floor all with gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels in glazed Tuscan porch with 2 columns in antis and cornice with relieving arch over. Recessed service wing to right with 1 glazing bar sash to each floor. Left return front: 2 storey canted bay window, the central sash rising completely through internal wall divide to allow door access to garden.Eastling CPME13 0AE28-Aug-86TQ 96768 57810
1069272SPUCKLESC16HouseII4/1 Spuckles
House. C16 with early C19 additions. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill on ground floor and weather boarded on first floor, with additional bay in red brick. Plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys and continuous jetty on brackets. Roof hipped to right, half-hipped to left, with stacks to end left and centre right. Gabled semi-dormer in C19 addition to left, and 3 wooden casements on first floor, 3 three- light mullioned casements on ground floor and boarded door to centre right.
Eastling CPME13 0AQ28-Aug-86TQ 97086 56868
1343971NORTH COURT FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII4/4 1-2 North Court Farmhouse
Manor House, now 2 houses. C15 and altered early C19. Timber framed and rendered with plain tiled roof, with brick and tile hung additions to rear. Two storeys and jettied to right on dragon posts, with hipped roof and gablets and stack to centre left. Two projecting 2 storey canted bay windows to left and right capped with octagonal rooflets. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor of each bay, and 2 glazing bar sashes on central first floor, and segmental bay window to right below the jetty. Central plank and stud door with glazed fanlight. Interior: early C19 fittings and stair with curved handrail. Crown post roof. Once the chief manor house of Eastling.
Eastling CPME13 0AQ24-Jan-67TQ 96716 57007
1054867BOX COTTAGEC17HouseII*4/20 Box Cottage 24.1.67 GV II
House. C17 and early C19. Timber framed range underbuilt with red brick and tile hung, and red brick range. Plain tiled roofs. Two parallel ranges. Road front: 2 gabled ends of 2 ranges. Two storeys, with stacks to end left in catslide outshot, and right. Two wooden casements to each floor, and door to centre left of 6 raised and fielded panels with open pediment on fluted pilasters. Right return: 2 storeys with stacks to end left and right. Three glazing bar sashes with box surrounds on first floor and 2 on ground floor with gauged heads. Central glazed door with semi-circular head.
Eastling CPME13 0AX24-Jan-67TQ 96378 56494
1069239EASTLING MANORC13HouseII*4/19 Eastling 27.8.52 Manor
House. C14 and 1616. Timber framed and exposed close-studding with plaster infill, part rendered, part tile hung, on red brick base with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with half-hipped roof and gablets. 3 hipped dormers and stacks to left and centre right. Two 3 light transomed windows, 1 single light and one 5 light on first floor, and two 5-light transomed windows with hipped hoods and single light on ground floor. All dormers and windows with central arched transoms. Two storey hipped and projecting porch to centre with C20 glass outer doors and multi-panelled inner door. Right return front: tile hung with oriel windows to each floor, with rear wing of close- studding on red brick base and C20 canted bay window. Interior: rear wing partial survival of C14 or C13 aisled hall with scissor-truss roof. Present main range added 1616 with contemporary cellars, wainscot panelling and doors and turned baluster screen to service area. Open well staircase of 3 storeys with turned balusters, bell pendants and moulded hand- rail. Large oak fireplace with carved coupled baluster pilasters with scrolled and foliated frieze and cornice-mantel. Known originally as Gregories, the wing of 1616 added by a Mr Parmiter (see Hasted, vol. VI p422; also BOE KENT II, 1983, p307).
Eastling CPME13 0AX27-Aug-52TQ 96263 56518
1069242CARPENTERS ARMS INNC16Public HouseII4/28 Carpenters 24.1.67 Arms Inn
Public House. C16 and c1800. Rear wing timber framed and rendered and underbuilt with red brick with plain tiled roof, front wing red brick with plain tiled roof. Road front: two storeys and hipped roof, with regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with central half-glazed door in panelled surround with projecting cornice on pilasters. Rear wing: 1 storey and attic, with 1 hipped dormer and large stack to centre right. Central half-glazed door and wood casement window, and catslide outshot to left.
Eastling CPME13 0AX24-Jan-67TQ 96273 56578
1343936MANOR COTTAGEC17HouseII4/21 Manor Cottage
House. C17. Timber framed, rendered and clad with red brick on return fronts. Plain tiled roof. Two bay lobby entry plan. One storey and attic with half-hipped roof, 2 gabled dormers and central stack. Two metal casements and central boarded door with flat hood.
Eastling CPME13 0AX28-Aug-86TQ 96371 56502
1054891DIVAN COURTC16HouseII4/18 Divan Court
House. C16 and early C19. Part timber framed, underbuilt with flint, and rendered, with plain tiled roofs. C19 main range with earlier range returned to right. Entrance front: 2 storeys and hipped roof with 3 stacks to left and centre left, and 1 large flint stack projecting end right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor and 3 large glazing bar sashes on ground floor with door of 6 panels to left. Right return front: flint and red brick on ground floor, and steeply pitched hipped roof stepped down to right. One of the original manor houses of Eastling. The name derived from medieval holders, the Dive family (See Hasted, VI, 431 ).
Eastling CPME13 0AY28-Aug-86TQ 96510 56616
1069234THE OLD RECTORYC19RectoryII4/5 The Old Rectory
Rectory, now house. Early C19. Yellow stock brick and slate roof. Two storeys on plinth with box eaves to hipped roof with stacks to centre left and centre right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 4 on ground floor all with gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels in glazed Tuscan porch with 2 columns in antis and cornice with relieving arch over. Recessed service wing to right with 1 glazing bar sash to each floor. Left return front: 2 storey canted bay window, the central sash rising completely through internal wall divide to allow door access to garden.
Eastling CPME13 0AY28-Aug-86TQ 96387 56781
1069240KINGS COTTAGESC19CottageIIIn the entry for THE STREET TQ 95 NE EASTLING (West side)
4/23 Little Kings Cottage and 2/3 Kings Cottages
The address shall be amended to read
4/23 Nos 1 and 2 Kings Cottages
4/23 Little Kings Cottage and 2/3 Kings Cottage
Three cottages, now cottage pair. Early C19. Timber framed and clad with weatherboard with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left and to right. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor with 3 boarded doors to left, centre, and right.
Eastling CPME13 0AY28-Aug-86TQ 96358 56687
1069241PORCH HOUSEC16HouseIIPorch House 4/24 24.1.67 GV II
House. C16. Timber framed and rendered and underbuilt with painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two cell lobby entry plan. Two storeys with moulded eaves cornice to steeply hipped roof with gablets and large central multiple stack. Central 2 storey gabled porch, timber framed and jettied over red brick ground floor. Two wooden casements on first floor and 1 in porch first floor, and bay windows to left and right, with 1 wooden casement to right on ground floor. Boarded door in porch, with round- arched brick porch doorway on imposts.
Eastling CPME13 0AY24-Jan-67TQ 96346 56681
1343974CHURCH OF ST MARYC12ChurchII*4/13 Church of St. Mary
Parish Church. C13 nave and chancel with C12 details, C14 chapel, restored 1855-6 by R.C.Hussey. Flint with plain tiled roofs and slate spire. Nave and aisles, chancel with south chapel, south-western tower and west porch. Reset west C12 doorway, the moulded surrounds with railhead and keel roll on attached and clasped shafts with acanthine capitals and billet moulded hood-mould. C19 flint porch. Two storey south-west tower with heavy offset buttresses, that to south-east rebuilt in brick. Round-headed belfry lights. Partially restored C15 Perpendicular fenestration except C14 bar tracery windows in south chapel and 2 C13 lancets in chancel north wall with 2 blocked quatrefoils in chancel east wall. North nave aisle entirely C19, with vestry to north west. Interior: nave with 3 bay arcade and 1 unarcaded western bay. The chamfered arches carried on round piers were re-constructed by Hussey, either re-using or copying exactly the moulded capitals, different in each case. C19 roof of 4 trussed crown posts. Double chamfered C19 chancel arch. South aisle with C14 chamfered arch to south chapel. South chapel of St. Katherine with 3 tie- beams exposed in roof, and 2 bay double hollow chamfered arcade to chancel, on hollowed octagonal piers. Chancel wall heavily battered and thicker in west bay, with 2 C13 lancets to north, and C13 roll-moulded reveal to C19 inserted east window. Waggon roof. Fittings: C13 trefoil-headed triple sedilia and piscina in chancel on colonnettes, deeply moulded capitals and mouldings under continuous hood mould. Double aumbry on north chancel wall, and 4 chamfered trefoil headed recesses on carved corbels and brackets, possibly choir or musicians’ stalls. C19 box pews with brass triple candle holders, and C19 font. Late C17 wooden parish chest. Glass: 1863 in chancel lancet by Powell and Sons. Monuments: in chancel, wall plaque to William Wickens, d.1718. Black rectangular field with latin inscription, with white marble surround and cartouche over, on base with cherub’s head and motto. In the south chapel, standing wall monument to Martin James, d.1592. A knight and 2 sons kneel opposite a reading desk, the wife and 2 daughters face them. Architectural surround with cornice on Corinthian columns, carrying obelisks and central achievement. The whole carved on small but detailed scale. [See BOE KENT II, 1983 (p306).)
Eastling CPME13 0AY24-Jan-67TQ 96522 56555
1367034HEADSTONE 15 METRES SOUTH WEST OF WEST DOOR OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC18HeadstoneII4/14 Headstone 15 metres south- west of west door of Church of St. Mary
Headstone. C18. Stone. Mary Tanner, died 1717. Two feet high with double curved head, carved with 2 deaths heads separated by crossed bones.
Eastling CPME13 0AY28-Aug-86TQ 96495 56540
1367056FORGE HOUSEC17HouseII4/22 Forge House
House. C17 and refronted C19. Timber framed and roughcast with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and stack to centre left. Three gabled semi-dormers on first floor and 3 wooden casements on ground floor, with boarded door to centre left in gabled porch. Garage extension to right of 1 storey and attic.
Eastling CPME13 0AY28-Aug-86TQ 96362 56704
10548242-4, THE STREETC16CottageII4/25 Nos. 2-4
Cottage row. C16, clad C18 and extended C19. Timber framed and clad with mathematical tiles and extended in red brick with plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with roof hipped to right with 4 hipped dormers and stacks to right and end left. Two wood casements and segmental bay window to right on ground floor, with 3 half-glazed doors to centre, left and end right all with flat hoods on brackets.
Eastling CPME13 0AZ28-Aug-86TQ 96314 56636
1343937PLANTATION HOUSEC16HouseIIHouse. C17. Timber framed, rendered and clad with red brick on return fronts. Plain tiled roof. Two bay lobby entry plan. One storey and attic with half-hipped roof, 2 gabled dormers and central stack. Two metal casements and central boarded door with flat hood.Eastling CPME13 0AZ24-Jan-67TQ 96284 56596
1343987K6 TELEPHONE KIOSKC20Telephone KioskIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 19/03/2014
Telephone kiosk. Type K6. Designed 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Made by various contractors. Cast iron. Square kiosk with domed roof. Unperforated George VI crowns to top panels and margin glazing to windows and door.
Eastling CPME13 0AZ08-Oct-89TQ 96294 56603
1367102WOODEN COTTAGEC19CottageII4/27 Wooden Cottage
House. Early C19. Timber framed and clad with weather board with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to rear left and rear right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes in moulded surrounds on first floor, and 2 on ground floor, with central door of 6 raised and fielded panels, part glazed in porch with leaded roof. Included for group value.
Eastling CPME13 0AZ28-Aug-86TQ 96270 56595
1054884HEADSTONE 25 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH CHAPEL OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC18HeadstoneII4/16 Headstone 25 metres south of south chapel of Church of St. Mary
Headstone. C18. Stone. Christopher Giles, Gent. died 1755. Four feet high carved with 2 skulls separated by crossed bones and hourglass, with spade and pick crossed either side of main design.
Eastling CPME13 0BA28-Aug-86TQ 96532 56533
1069238HEADSTONE 30 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH CHAPEL OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC18HeadstoneII4/15 Headstone 30 metres south of south chapel of Church of St. Mary
Headstone. C18. Stone. Thomas Hill junior, died 1756. Four feet high and carved with winged cherub in floriate surround with trumpets.
Eastling CPME13 0BA28-Aug-86TQ 96533 56523
1343935HEADSTONE 20 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH CHAPEL OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC18HeadstoneII4/17 Headstone 20 metres south of south chapel of Church of St. Mary
Headstone. C18. Stone. Sarah, wife of Christopher Giles, died 1756. Four feet high and carved with winged cherub with trumpets in floriate surround.
Eastling CPME13 0BA28-Aug-86TQ 96532 56537
1343972KETTLE HILL FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII4/7 Kettle Hill Farmhouse
House. C16. Timber framed, clad with red brick and tile hung, and exposed on rear front, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets and central stack. Irregular fenestration of 2 wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor with boarded door to right. Catslide outshot to left and right. Interior: heavy frame exposed.
Eastling CPME13 0BB28-Aug-86TQ 96660 55531
1069232ARNOLDS OAK FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII4/2 Arnolds Oak Farmhouse
Manor house, now farmhouse. C16 and extended early C19. Timber framed and rendered and painted brick with plain tiled roofs. Four framed bay block with 2 bay C19 wing added to left. C16 wing: 2 storeys on plinth and attic, with continuous jetty underbuilt to left. Hipped roof with central stack and 2 hipped dormers. One glazing bar sash and 2 wooden casements on first floor, 1 glazing bar sash, 1 tripartite sash and 1 wood casement on ground floor. C19 wing: 2 storeys on plinth with stacks to left and right. Two glazing bar sashes and central stair light on first floor, and 1 tripartite glazing bar sash on ground floor, with door to right of 6 raised and fielded panels and traceried semi-circular fan in Doric porch.
Eastling CPME13 0BD24-Jan-67TQ 97121 55652
1396576PETT DANEC16HouseIIEASTLING
1446/0/10017 PETT DANE 24-FEB-11
House. Probably circa 1500, with external chimneystack added in the late C16 or early C17 and re-roofed in the early C19. The late-C20 north-eastern extension is not of special interest.
MATERIALS: Timber-framed on plinth of rough flints, with some lath and plaster infilling, partly clad in weatherboarding. Steeply-pitched tiled roof covered in C19 tiles with alternate courses of plan and pointed tiles. Two external brick chimneystacks.
PLAN: Two storey two-bay house with end jetty. Possibly originally an open hall with chimneystack later added to the north-east. A further external chimneystak was added to the west in the early C19.
EXTERIOR: The south or entrance front has exposed close-studding with a central full-height bay post, midrail and a curved tension brace to the upper floor west near the jetty. The two first floor windows are C20 wooden casements with leaded lights and the ground floor windows are late-C19 or early-C20 casements with bracketed hoods. However in the centre of the first floor are two original smaller blocked window openings and there is evidence for two further openings in the corresponding position on the north side. There is a C20 plank door with wooden hood to the extreme right hand side and adjoining this, the thin ground floor framing surrounding a window suggests this could be the position of the original entrance. The west elevation is mainly covered in weatherboarding, except for part of the ground floor which is of early-C19 brickwork, and there is a central early-C19 external brick chimneystack. The jetty survives, except where the external chimneystack has been inserted. Internally a curved brace is visible on the ground floor There is a wooden casement on each floor. The remainder of the west front consists of the late-C20 extension, which has a brick ground floor with weatherboarding above. The east side has jowled posts, central post and studs on the upper floor, visible internally. The ground floor has C20 framing but the sole plate is original. There is a C19 or early-C20 wooden casement window with hood and brackets to the ground floor. At the junction with the later extension is a large external brick chimneystack of late-C16 or early-C17 date, strengthened at the base in the C20 and with early-C19 brickwork above the roof ridge. The northern part of the east side comprises the later extension but incorporates an early-C19 ledged plank door. The original north side is now covered by the late-C20 extension but internally retains the wallplate, soleplate, midrail, midpost, some studs at the western end, with a curved brace in the same position as the one on the south side and the sockets and shutter grooves for two original windows in the centre of the first floor.
INTERIOR: The interior retains early-C19 floor joists and internal partitions on the ground floor and two early-C19 wooden bressumers to the chimneys. A C20 winder staircase leads to the upper floor which retains the original c.1500 corner posts, wallplates, midrail, bay posts, a number of studs and the central tiebeam. The softwood roof of thin scantling retains the marks of lath and plaster and is of early-C19 date. There is an early-C19 cast-iron firegrate in the north-eastern corner.
HISTORY: Pett Dane is a former farmstead. The word Dane may derive from the Anglo-Saxon word ‘den’ meaning pasture. The end jetty, close-studding and curved tension braces suggest a late-C15 or early-C16 date. An external chimneystack was added in the late-C16 or early-C17 and in the early-C19 the house was clad in weatherboarding and a further chimneystack added to the jettied end. Pett Dane appears on the 1894 Ordnance Survey map with a square footprint and is shown with a separate well to the north-west and further outbuildings situated to the north-east and north-west. By the 1897 map some of the outbuildings have been demolished. A large extension was added to the north-west in 1997.
Raspberry Vale Cottage
Eastling CPME13 0BD24-Feb-11TQ 97447 56345
1054811TONG HOUSEC15Wealden HouseIITong House 4/29 24.1.67 II
Wealden hall house, now house. C15. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill and part underbuilt with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. Four framed bays, with framed and continuously jettied wing to right rear. Two storeys on flint plinth with left and right end bays jettied on dragon posts, the left jetty underbuilt. Flying wall plate on solid curved braces and hipped roof with gablets and stacks to rear right, centre right and projecting end left. Irregular fenestration of one 2 storey canted bay window to centre left, and 4 wooden casements on first floor and 4 glazing bar sashes and 1 wooden casement in bay window on ground floor. Door of 6 raised and fielded panels to left with semi-circular traceried fan. Four centre arched door surround to original screens passage to centre right, with carved head and carvings of pelican and cockatrice in spandrels. Interior: smoke blackening, crown post roof. The rear four centred arched door surround to screens passage has been moved to rear of present front door. Stack inserted into hell originally backing onto screens passage.
Eastling CPME13 0BH24-Jan-67TQ 95946 56236
1054933TONG COTTAGEC16HouseII4/12 Tong Cottage
House. C16 and altered C18. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill, with return and rear fronts part tile hung, part clad with flint and brick. Plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys on flint plinth with large panel framing and continuous jetty. Roof hipped to right and half- hipped to left with gablet. Stacks to end right and to rear centre in catslide outshot. Three wooden casements on each floor, with boarded door to right, and blocked door frame to centre.
Eastling CPME13 0BJ28-Aug-86TQ 95461 56243
1069236SKILTONSC18HouseII4/10 Skiltons
House. C18. Partly timber framed and clad with red brick and tile hung, part structural yellow stock brick and flint, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on flint plinth, tile hung on first floor, with hipped roof and stacks to left and right. Three wooden casements on first floor, and 3 on ground floor, that to left of only 1 light, the others of 3 lights. Boarded door to centre right.
Eastling CPME13 0BL28-Aug-86TQ 95963 55514
1343973NEW HOUSE FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII4/9 New House Farmhouse
House. C16 and C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with discontinuous plat band and hipped roof, stacks to centre and end left. Four wooden casements on each floor and boarded door in gabled porch in slight central projection. Interior: timber framing exposed internally.
Eastling CPME13 0BN28-Aug-86TQ 95987 55924
1069200CORNER HOUSEC18HouseIICorner House 6/127 II
House. C18. Painted brick on flint base with flint side walls and plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges and lobby entry plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with central stack. Two wooden casements and central metal casement on first floor, and 2 segment headed wooden casements on ground floor with central boarded door.
Stalisfield CPME13 0BS28-Aug-86TQ 95062 54816
1069206WINGFIELD FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII4/146 Wingfield Farmhouse 16.2.77 GV II
Farmhouse. C17 and c.1800. Red brick and plain tiled roof, and timber framed, clad with red brick and tile hung. Two parallel ranges. Entrance front: two storeys and basement on flint plinth, with stacks to left and to right. Four glazing bar sashes on first floor and on ground floor with rendered gauged heads. Door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, in gabled porch to left. Rear range: half-hipped tile hung range.
Stalisfield CPME13 0BS16-Feb-77TQ 95291 55161
1203346HORSE WHEEL 5 YARDS NORTH OF WINGFIELD FARMHOUSEC18Horse WheelII4/147 Horse Wheel 5 yards north 16.2.77 of Wingfield Farmhouse
Horse wheel for drawing water. C18. Timber frame, with weather boarded housing and corrugated iron roof, partly supported on rear wall of brick and flint. Horizontal beam on single post to rear, and 2 posts to front, with winding drum and horse beam and brake on central vertical post.
Stalisfield CPME13 0BS16-Feb-77TQ 95295 55169
1069237THE GREETINGC16HouseII4/11 The Greeting
House, now 3 cottages. C16 and C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and weather board with plain tiled roof, extended with flint and red brick and plain tiled roofs. Timber framed range with 3 projecting wings, originally to rear, now the entrance side. Two storeys with half-hipped roof and stacks to centre left and to end right with 3 projecting 2 storey hipped wings, each with wooden casement on each floor and 1 boarded door. Interior: frame visible.
Stalisfield CPME13 0BW28-Aug-86TQ 95645 55393
1069243OLD FRITH FARMC16FarmII3/32 Old Frith Farm
(Formerly listed as Frith Farm Cottage) 24.1.67 II
House. C16. Timber framed and clad with red brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on basement and hipped roof with stack to left. Five glazing bar sashes on first floor. 2 on ground floor with central tripartite glazing bar sash,with segmental heads. Boarded door to left with moulded architrave and bracketed hood. Basement openings to left.
Newnham CPME13 0DD24-Jan-67TQ 94555 55384
1372896COPTON MANORC14ManorI1/66 Copton Manor 24.1.67 GV I
Manor house. Circa 1300, remodelled and extended C18 and mid C19. Flint and rubble stone, rendered, with plain tiled roofs. Hall house with 2 storey chamber block and offset wing (bailiffs quarters). C19 ballroom added to chamber block. Entrance front: 2 storeys and attic with tall hipped roof. Three gabled dormers and stacks to rear left, centre and right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Offcentre door of panels, the top 2 glazed, with semi-circular fanlight and flat hood on pilasters. Two storey half-octagonal bay windows to left, with glazing bar sashes, and 1 storey extension to right with 2 sashes. The whole front is slightly asymmetrical. Left return: 2 storeys, the upper storey breaking eaves line. Large hipped roof with gablet, stacks to left, centre anti right. Two glazing bar sashes first floor, 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Blocked screens passage entry to centre left. Small C19 porch (blocked) in re-entrant with cross wing to right. Bailiffs quarters: (now a potting shed) to left. Now detached, but originally built into left end wall, the stone gable still stands, projecting from the main line of the range. The rest of the range is of painted brick, 2 storeys, with 1 casement window and boarded door on ground floor. Rear:weatherboarded external staircase with bell-pull, built for the use of farmhands to reach attic accommodation in main range. Ogee-headed 2 light window on rear wall, originally with some tracery. Interior: entirely preserved despite the later alterations and additions are 3 scissor braced roofs over the 3 ranges (chamber block, hall, with smoke-blackening, and bailiffs quarters- this with added tie-beams). Pointed chamfered doorways and blocked windows in various positions. Few other interior features – the hall roof is of very good quality work. Mason’s marks associated with Canterbury Cathedral 1166-1220, although the ogee-headed windows suggest an early C14 date. (See Traditional Kent Buildings, no.1, 1984, pp 16-21, plans and elevations).
Sheldwich CPME13 0DL24-Jan-67TR 01706 59022
1407589Barn approximately 80 metres to north of Copton ManorC14BarnIIAisled threshing barn, C14, modified in the C18 and early C19. Roof replaced above tie-beam level in the second half of the C20.
Copton Manor was in the ownership of Christchurch Priory, Canterbury before the Norman Conquest and documentary evidence refers to manorial buildings in existence here in the C13. A document in the British Library (MS Cotton Galba EIV 102v) states that in 1294 the hall, solar and barn were re-roofed with tile at a cost of £6. Christchurch accounts under Prior Thomas Chillenden (1391-1411) refer to a ‘new barn’ here. Stylistically this barn is currently considered to have been erected in the C14 but reusing some timbers from an earlier C12 or C13 barn. The barn underwent some alteration in the C18 and early C19 by the replacement of the plinth in brick, re-cladding of the walls and alteration of the two cart entrances. Originally a threshing barn, later part of the interior was partitioned off for animal use.
The building is shown on the first edition 25 inch Ordnance Survey map of 1895. The second edition map of 1896 additionally shows a further section added to the north and the eastern section of the south side extended outwards. The 1907 map shows little change from the earlier map. A 1940s aerial photograph taken from a spitfire shows the barn with a hipped thatched roof, two gabled cart entrances on the north side and the extension on the south side. After the war the roof structure above tie beam level was taken down and the barn was re-roofed in corrugated asbestos. Copton Manor, which is thought to date from circa 1300 and incorporates scissor-braced roofs behind its Georgian exterior, was listed at Grade I in 1967. In 1980 students from Canterbury School of Architecture studied the barn and suggested a late C14 date. In 1986 this barn was listed at Grade II as part of a re-survey of Sheldwich parish, its date estimated as C15. This barn was examined in the early 1990s by the RCHME as part of their project on Medieval houses in Kent and dated between 1320 and 1340. Dendrochronological dating did not produce conclusive results. This barn has recently been sold into separate ownership from Copton Manor and was mistakenly removed from the statutory list in 2010 instead of another barn at the farm, also listed in 1986 which was demolished several years ago.
Threshing barn later part adapted to animal housing. Probably erected in the early to mid C14 but reusing some earlier timbers of C12 or C13 date. The building was modified in the C18 and early C19 and lost its original roof above tie beam level in the second half of the C20. The late C19 extension on the western end of the north side is not of special interest.
MATERIALS: a timber framed barn, originally probably on a flint and stone plinth, which was replaced in brick in the C18 and its walls have weatherboard cladding. The roof, still hipped and thatched in the 1940s, was subsequently replaced by corrugated asbestos.
PLAN: in plan it is a symmetrical seven bay barn, aisled to both sides and ends, aligned roughly east to west, 36.4 metres long by 9.3 metres wide. It has five full bays and two cantilevered end half bays. It had two threshing bays in the third and fifth bays. A mezzanine floor was later inserted into the eastern part. The three western bays on the north side have lost the aisle walls.
EXTERIOR: the north side has weatherboard cladding to the four western bays and the third bay from the west has a large gabled cart entrance with double doors. The three eastern bays were open-fronted at the time of inspection. The south side has weatherboarding over a C20 brick plinth to the east and over an C18 brick plinth in English bond to the west, which incorporates a brick arch leading to a void under the threshing floor. The south side has two plank doors, one of them C18 and a window opening with shutters and iron hinges. Further west are some small C20 window openings. The west and east ends have weatherboard cladding.
INTERIOR: internally the cross frames have mortise and tenon joints. The arcade posts are substantial timbers of roughly square section and have shouldered jowls supporting the tie beams and arcade plates. Some posts have redundant lap joints at the head of the posts and are reused from an earlier building, probably a barn rather than a domestic building as there is no trace of smoke blackening. Passing braces descend from high on the rear face of the posts into the aisles, crossing the aisle-ties by means of halvings. The wall plates are on top of the aisle ties (reverse assembly). Only three sections of wall plate are used for the whole length. The two end cross frames incorporate reused timbers. The arcade plates have splayed scarfs above the threshing bays and the scarfs have under-squinted abutments. The aisle walls have been renewed over time but some original timbers survive at the east end, including a medieval corner post. A groove on the soffit of the south aisle wallplate shows that the barn walls originally had thick vertical boards. The roof above tie beam level was removed after the Second World War and replaced by a shallow pitched roof with softwood rafters and purlins. The birdsmouths for rafters are present on many of the arcade-plates and aisle wall plates and show the rafters were probably about six inches wide. The roof may have been of crownpost type but as there are no mortises in the tie beams for down braces it could have been of sans-purlin type or a roof combining a crownpost and a central purlin with scissor braces. There is a wooden threshing floor. One south low cart door is an C18 ledged plank door. The eastern end has a modern mezzanine floor, wooden partition wall and internal walls concealing the original wall frame, probably erected for animal shelter.
Faversham War Memorial
Sheldwich CPME13 0DL22-Mar-12TR 01730 59104
1069196WHITEHILL HOUSEC18HouseIIHand water pump. C19. Cast iron, painted grey and white. Three feet in height, with fluted acorn shaped head and curved spout with knob. Curved handle with end-weight, in heart shape.Ospringe CPME13 0DN24-Jan-67TR 00059 59267
1343992COURTYARD AND GARDEN WALLS AND INTEGRAL OUTBUILDING 20 METRES EAST OF WHITEHILL HOUSEC18WallII5/116 Courtyard and Garden walls and integral outbuilding 20 metres east of White- hill House
Courtyard wall and outbuilding. C18. Red brick and slate roof. Wall approx 8 foot in height, the lower half in English bond, the upper in Flemish bond. Gatepiers with flat stone caps. Wall approx 30 yards along roadside and 5O yards south-east including storage building, 2 storeys of red brick with slated and hipped roof. Included for group value with Whitehill House.
Ospringe CPME13 0DN28-Aug-86TR 00087 59279
1069194FORGE COTTAGEC16CottageII4/111 Whitehill Nos. 1 and 2 (Forge Cottage) GV II
C16. Timber framed and rendered, and tile hung on right return, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to centre left. Four wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor, with half-glazed door to centre right and boarded door to end left.
Ospringe CPME13 0DW28-Aug-86TQ 99844 59146
1069195HAND PUMP 10 METRES NORTH WEST OF 1-2 WHITEHILLC19Hand PumpII4/112 Hand pump 10 metres north-west of 1-2 White- hill
Hand water pump. C19. Cast iron, painted grey and white. Three feet in height, with fluted acorn shaped head and curved spout with knob. Curved handle with end-weight, in heart shape.
Ospringe CPME13 0DW28-Aug-86TQ 99840 59153
1343990COLDSTREAM COTTAGEC19HouseII4/110 Coldstream Cottage
House. Early C19. Timber framed and weatherboarded with slated roof. Two storeys on brick plinth with hipped roof and stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with central door of 4 panels and semi-circular traceried fanlight. Included for group value.
Ospringe CPME13 0DW28-Aug-86TQ 99823 59132
1343991BROOK FARMC18FarmIIOSPRINGE WHITEHILL (east side) Brook Farm
Farmhouse. C18 exterior. Painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to centre right. Two wooden casements on each floor. Boarded door in left return of 1 storey flint and brick extension to left, part rendered, with half-hipped roof and 1 wooden casement.
Ospringe CPME13 0DW28-Aug-86TQ 99859 59161
1355031ORCHARD ENDC18HouseII4/114 Orchard End
House. C18. Rendered brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor and central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with moulded surround and cornice hood on pilasters.
Ospringe CPME13 0DW24-Jan-67TQ 99930 59204
1069938CHAMBERS COTTAGEC16HouseII1/112 Chambers Cottage 10.2.76 GV II
House. C16 and clad C17 and C20. Timber framed and clad with painted brick in English bond on ground floor and fish-scale tile hanging on first floor. Exposed and restored close-studding on right return with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys with end jetty at right. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks at end left and to rear right. Two wooden casements on each floor, those on ground floor with segmental heads, and rib and stud to right in hipped porch.
Sheldwich CPME13 0DZ10-Feb-76TR 01552 56267
1069939WEST ENDC17HouseII1/113 West End
House. C17 and clad C19. Timber framed with painted brick base, weatherboarded front, and painted brick side elevations. Plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. line storey and attic with stacks projecting at left end and to centre right, and 1 hipped dormer. One glazing bar sash to left, 2 C20 wooden casements centre and right, and door to centre right with Gothick pattern ribs and flat hood. Catslide outshot to rear. Included for group value with Chambers Cottage.
Sheldwich CPME13 0DZ10-Nov-86TR 01561 56243
1363420THE WHITE HOUSEC16HouseII1/115 The White House 10.2.76 GV II
House. C16 and clad C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick in English bond, with weatherboarded rear elevation. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bays and lobby entry. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets and stack to centre left. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor with moulded surrounds. Boarded door to centre left with moulded surround and moulded C20 flat-hooded porch. Interior: full frame visible.
Sheldwich CPME13 0ED10-Feb-76TR 01435 56140
1372014MEADOW COTTAGEC17Timber-framed houseII1/116 Meadow Cottage 10.2.76 GV II
House. C17 and earlier. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and part weatherboarded. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and stack to centre right. Single storey wing to right with hipped roof and gablet. Two metal casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor, and door of 6 panels in right end wing.
Sheldwich CPME13 0ED10-Feb-76TR 01333 56135
1069228PAINTER’S FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseIIPainter’s 4/97 Farmhouse
House. C15 and C16. Timber framed part exposed with plaster infill, part rendered and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. C15 hall house with C16 wing added. Two storeys and roof hipped to left, half-hipped to right with stacks to rear right, rear centre, stack to end left, twice offset. Two wooden casements on each floor, and central half-door Left return: close-studded and exposed, with gabled added wing to rear. Interior: crown post roof in C15 wing.
Ospringe CPME13 0EG24-Jan-67TQ 99071 59017
1051678THE MANOR HOUSEC16HouseII1/55 The Manor House 24.1.67 GV II
House. C16 restored mid C20. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill and underbuilt with red brick. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bay lobby entry plan. Two storeys large panelled framing with tension braces, hipped roof with gablets and stack to centre left. Four leaded wooden casements on each floor, and boarded door to centre left in gabled half-timbered porch. Outshot to right.
Sheldwich CPME13 0EH24-Jan-67TR 01061 56638
1069084BARN, NOW GARAGE ABOUT 10 METRES EAST OF THE STOCKSC17BarnII1/57 Barn, now garage about 10 metres east of The Stocks
Barn, now garage workshop. C17. Timber framed on flint base and clad with weatherboarding. Corrugated iron roof. Half-hipped with raking mid strey. Interior: 3 bays with aisles, passing shores to arcade posts and renewed clasped purlin roof. Included for group value with The Stocks.
Sheldwich CPME13 0EH10-Nov-86TR 01058 56702
1031386BAYFIELD HOUSEC16HouseIIBayfield 4/96 Farmhouse
House. 1613 and early C19. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill, and red brick with applied timber and render, with plain tiled roof. C16 range with early C19 additions left and right forming a cross-plan. Entrance front: 2 storeys with projecting gable to left, jettied at first floor and gable level, with carved bresummers, and moulded barge- board with pendant. Stacks to centre left, and end right. One leaded Gothic window on each floor to left of gable, 2 wooden casements on each floor to right of gable with 2 light garret window, 4 light oriel on brackets with sidelights on first floor, and 4 light mullioned window with sidelights on ground floor. C20 glazed door in modern porch to right. Dated 1613 on upper bressummer of gable.
Ospringe CPME13 0EQ24-Jan-67TQ 99148 58963
1343981PARSONAGE FARMC16FarmII4/167 Parsonage Farm 24.1.67 GV II
House. C16 and early C19. Timber framed rear range with red brick infill, front range of red brick. Plain tiled roofs. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys with paired modillion eaves brackets to hipped roof with stacks to right and to rear. Regular fenestration of 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes on each floor and central single glazing bar sash on first floor. Central door of 6 panels with semi-circular fanlight in Doric porch with open pediment. Rear range with exposed small panel framing and red brick infill.
Throwley CPME13 0ET24-Jan-67TQ 99784 55935
1069227THE OLD HOUSEC18HouseII4/95 The Old House
House. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth and hipped roof with 2 stacks to left and 2 to right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 4 on ground floor, all with box surrounds, those on ground floor with segmental heads. Central half-glazed door with engaged Doric columns, pulvinated frieze and modillion cornice. Built 1792 as the parish workhouse [See Faversham Papers, No.15, 1978).
Ospringe CPME13 0EW24-Jan-67TQ 99410 59503
1343970LITTLE OAKSC18HouseIILittle Oaks 4/94 II
House, C18, altered early C19. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with moulded eaves cornice, with stacks to left and to right and 2 hipped dormers. Two glazing bar sashes with moulded surrounds on first floor, and 2 margin light French windows on ground floor with deeply moulded surrounds. Central door of 4 panels with semi-circular fanlight moulded surround in half-timbered and half-hipped porch. Two storey hipped extension to left, with brick and glass conservatory.
Ospringe CPME13 0EW28-Aug-86TQ 99447 59606
1031377CHURCHMAN’S FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseIIOSPRINGE KENNAWAYS
Churchman’s Farmhouse II
House. C16 and early C19. Timber framed and rendered with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with battlemented parapet to hip, return to road front, and stack to centre right. Two Gothic pointed windows first floor, 1 on ground floor with boarded door to left and arched, traceried fanlight. Right return front: 3 Gothic pointed windows on each floor.
Ospringe CPME13 0HA24-Jan-67TQ 99211 58360
1203366PIGEON HOUSEC19LodgeII4/152 Pigeon House
Lodge house to Belmont Park. Mid C19. Flint with red brick dressing and timber framed with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof with crested ridge tiles. Square plan with projecting porch and outshots to left and rear. Two storeys with gable roof, pierced bargeboards and pendant and stack to rear. Projecting porch with corbelled oriel and studded door in four-centred arched surround and side light. Outshots with pierced bargeboards.
Throwley CPME13 0HB28-Aug-86TQ 99301 57094
1069170TOWN PLACE COTTAGEC16HouseII4/154 Town Place Cottage
House. C16. Timber framed and weather boarded, with frame exposed on left return with red brick infill. Plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets and stack to centre left. Two wooden casements to each floor, and boarded door to centre left with flat hood on brackets. Brick outshot at end right and to rear.
Throwley CPME13 0HD28-Aug-86TQ 98973 56403
1069210SOUTH WILDERTON COTTAGESC16HouseII4/153 Nos 1 & 2 South Wilderton Cottages
House, now cottage pair. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick on ground floor, weatherboard on first floor. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and gablets and stacks to centre right and end right, and projecting at end left. Three wooden casements on first floor, 3 metal casements on ground floor. Ribbed door to centre left in C19 porch with barge-boards and pendant.
Throwley CPME13 0HD28-Aug-86TQ 99070 56493
1069171TOWN PLACEC15HouseII4/155 Town Place
House. C15 and refaced early C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick on ground floor and rendered first floor. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and exposed bressummer and moulded box eaves to hipped roof with stacks to left and right and to rear. Four glazing bar sashes on first floor, 3 tripartite glazing bar sashes on ground floor with door of 6 panels to centre right, the top 2 glazed, 1 with flat hood on brackets. Originally a manor house, possibly built temp. Henry VI (see Hasted, VI, 446).
Throwley CPME13 0HE24-Jan-67TQ 98796 56008
1343979HA-HA AND GATES 50 METRES EAST OF BELMONTC18Ha-ha and GateIIHouse, courtyard and water pump. First house built 1769 for Edward Wilkes, Storekeeper of Royal Powder Mills, Faversham. Remodelled and extended c.1787-1792 by Samuel Wyatt for General Lord Harris. Interior work by Basil Ionides, 1930s. Red brick, the main elevations of the house faced with buff- coloured gauged mathematical tiles, with Coade-stone and ashlar details. Slated roofs. The house is placed asymmetrically at the south and south-east corner of the stable courtyard and the internal arrangements set asymmetrically to an axial corridor. Neo-classical styling. Entrance (south front): 2 storeys and attic on plinth with guilloche plat band and modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 3 tripartite french windows, only the left end one genuine and the main entrance to the house. Set with a verandah of 3 bays on Ionic columns coupled to centre [with Coade-stone capitals), with 6 full height glazing bar sashes, separated by Doric pilasters, with cornice. Gauged niches to left and right with Coade-stone swags on plaques over them, one dated 1790. Kitchen buildings in red brick beyond. East front (the display front): 2 storeys and attic on plinths with guilloched plat band and modillion eaves cornice. Two projecting bows left and right with saucer domes and belvederes. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor in each bow, and 3 on each floor in centre. Over each window a Coade-stone plaque or medallion with swags, putti and emblems of the seasons. The central plaque depicts a figure of India on an artillery bastion studying plans of Belmont, an elevation of which appears in the background amongst palm trees. North front: as entrance front, but with 4 bay verandah of single columns, and bowed projection with tripartite “Wyatt” window, the cast iron balustrade carried across. Single storey range extends to north part of the courtyard, but also containing rooms for the main house. Stable courtyard: of chequered brick and slate to north of house, containing part of surviving 1769 house to south. 2 storeys on plinth with moulded cornice, 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 4 on ground floor with central boarded door, with flat hood on pilaster surround. Stables with elliptically arched doorways and sidelights, echoing the Wyatt window motif of the main house. Coach house with clock tower and cupola, dated 1792. Entrance to courtyard flanked by octagonal lodges in buff brick, with gauged niches, 1 glazing bar sash to entrance, and panelled door to courtyard. Hand pump attached to west range of courtyard, with wooden box body, and leaded spout dated 1790, curved handle with knop, and iron water trough. Interior: entrance vestibule, staircase hall and corridor form axis of house. Full height top-lit stair- case, with first floor balcony, and second floor balcony reached only from back stairs. Cast iron balustrade. Shallow well niches on the walls enhance the use of the stairhall as a gallery. Screen to upstairs corridor of 2 Ionic columns, in antis with elliptical arch over, and identical blank screen on opposite wall. This, with simplified details, along with the apse, forms the decorative motif for the whole interior. Main rooms to east of central axis, with drawing room and library occupying the bows of the east front, and internally with apsidal walls, with central dining room. Library with fitted veneered book- cases, again in “Wyatt window” configuration, gilded cornice and moulded frieze, with medallions and plaques on the wall- paper frieze. Spare decorative details elsewhere, light architraves and frieze, wall panelling, marble fire surrounds. Fitted shutters and pierglasses to bowed windows, and fitted wall niches in bedrooms. Study, office and billiard room isolated from main range along east wing of courtyard. Service rooms complete; half-glazed roof on orangery, again with apsidal end walls. Orangery and service wing with series of fine vaulted cellars, ascribed to 1769 house, but quality of design and workmanship is more akin to the Wyatt house. Below the main house runs an original hypocaust central heating system, stoked externally on the north front of the main house. (See Country Life, Jan 27 and Feb 3, 1955; see also BOE, Kent II, 1983, 138-9)Throwley CPME13 0HE28-Aug-86TQ 98652 56377
1069172GARDEN WALLS TO NORTH OF BELMONTC18WallII4/157 Garden walls to north of Belmont
Garden walls. C18. Red brick. Approx. 10 feet high, in 2 courtyards, immediately to north of Belmont, and 100 metres to north-west, enclosing areas approximately 50 yards by 50 yards and 50 by 60 yards on an irregular plan.
Throwley CPME13 0HH28-Aug-86TQ 98571 56434
1069173GARDEN PAVILION AT BELMONT PARK (TQ984567)C18PavillionII*4/159 Garden Pavilion at Belmont Park (TQ984567)
Garden pavilion. C18. Flint with Roman cement and brick details with slated roofs. Circular tower with circular stair turret and circular porch, in Gothick style. Two storeys on plinth with string course and cornice to battlements. Pinnacled stair turret to right. Single Y-traceried glazing bar sash window to centre, and boarded doors to left and right with traceried fanlights and double rebated surrounds.
Throwley CPME13 0HH28-Aug-86TQ 98365 56708
1000293BELMONT PARKC18Country HouseIIAn early C19 ornamental garden partly of late C18 origin and with mid to late C19 additions, set within an C18 and C19 park.
HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT
The land occupied by Belmont was bought from the Sondes family in the mid C18 by Edward Wilks, the store-keeper of the Royal Powdermills at Faversham, who built the first house on the site. It was sold in 1780 to Colonel Montresor of the Royal Engineers who enlarged the estate and built the present house. Mistakenly accused of embezzling army funds, his estate was sequestered by the government and sold at auction in 1801 to General George Harris, ennobled in 1815 as the first Lord Harris, for military service in India. The estate remained in the private ownership of the Harris family until the early 1980s when the fifth Lord Harris set up the present (1997) independent charitable trust to secure the preservation of Belmont.
DESCRIPTION
LOCATION, AREA, BOUNDARIES, LANDFORM, SETTING Belmont lies c 2km west of the A251, Faversham to Ashford road, some 0.5km to the north-west of Throwley village. The 83ha site, which comprises 5ha of formal and ornamental gardens set within 78ha of parkland and woodland, lies on the crest and slopes of a high, open chalk ridge on the dip-slope of the North Downs, the land falling away on the east and west sides of the site and rising very slightly towards the southern boundary. There are extensive views from the crest of the ridge to east and west along the line of the North Downs. The site is bounded to the west, south, and east by minor lanes and, except for a short length at the southern end of the east boundary, is largely screened from view by internal woodland or fringes of trees. To the north, the park abuts arable fields, orchards, and the wooded slopes and open fairways of a golf course while the whole estate is set within an undulating landscape of well-wooded arable and orchard land.
ENTRANCES AND APPROACHES The entrance to the park is through a gateway at the south-east corner, beside a half-timbered lodge dated 1879. The principal drive, a former public road converted to a private park drive in c 1790 (guidebook), follows a north-westerly course before turning northwards to pass the west side of the house in a wide curve from which a spur extends eastwards into the stable yard and around to the south, entrance front of the house. Beyond the house, the drive continues northwards, now (1997) as a track and then a path, to meet the public lane beyond the north boundary of the site. This drive is shown established on Mudge’s map of Kent of 1801, as is a former east drive, now grassed, which entered the park at the north-east corner and passed below the ha-ha on the east front of the house before looping north-westwards to cross the ha-ha and enter through a wrought-iron gate and screen to the south front forecourt. A further drive to the house, also now a grassed track and shown on Mudge’s map, entered from Stalisfield Lane on the western boundary, beside New York Cottage (listed grade II) which was built in c 1790 in the American Colonial style by the architect John Plaw (c 1745-1820) as a pair of timber-framed cottages for the Belmont estate.
PRINCIPAL BUILDING Belmont (listed, with the stables, grade I) stands on level ground in the centre of the park on the crest of a ridge and enjoys extensive views over the North Downs and north-eastwards to the Thames estuary. The main portion of the house, built for Colonel Montresor by Samuel Wyatt (1737-1807) from 1789 to 1793, sits partly on the site of and partly incorporates, buildings from a former house built by Edward Wilks in 1769. It is of two storeys, the principal, east front having nine bays, the outer six in two shallow bows with low, belvedere domes and glazed lanterns. Both the north and the south fronts incorporate a verandah on Ionic columns, with a single-storey orangery to the west of the south verandah. The whole house is faced in pale yellow mathematical tiles with the east front being decorated with Coade stone plaques. Adjoining the house to the north is a large, irregularly shaped stable courtyard, the west range and offices on the south side surviving from the 1769 house, the north range, designed by Samuel Wyatt, the east range and the two half-octagonal, yellow-brick lodges being added in the 1790s.
GARDENS AND PLEASURE GROUNDS The gardens and pleasure grounds surround the house in the form of a large oval, enclosed on the west side by the curve of the drive which is lined with a clipped holly hedge and occasional standard hollies. The east and south fronts of the house open onto a broad, semicircular lawn enclosed by a 1.2m high brick ha-ha wall which forms the east side of the oval. Inside the ha-ha, shown established on an estate plan of 1812, at points 110m north-east of and 25m south-east of the house, there are two sets of wrought-iron gates each with a short wing of fencing to either side (ha-ha and gates listed grade II). A few mature exotic trees, including plane, beech, and a tulip tree, survive from the fringe shown enclosing the south and east lawns in 1876 (OS), those on the south lawn now (1997) mixed with newly planted specimen trees. Between the south lawn and the principal approach drive, and extending northwards to the entrance to the stable yard, the grounds are laid out as a wooded shrubbery with mature native and exotic trees, including conifers, underplanted with yew and laurel in both natural and clipped forms. An estate sale plan of 1779 indicates shrubberies south of the house and trees are shown planted there on the 1812 estate plan. The present area of wooded shrubbery is shown established by the 1870s (OS 1876) while a laurel grove (not shown on either the estate plan of 1812 or the OS map of 1876), lying south of the house, is referred to in surviving family diaries of 1810-13.
North-west of the north range of the stables and enclosed by the clipped hedging along the main drive, is a pinetum, planted between 1812 (estate plan) and c 1870 (OS 1876). It is entered at the south end, through a wrought-iron gate beside the northern entrance lodge to the stable yard, which leads onto a lawn scattered with conifers of mixed species and age including late C20 planting. On the lawn some 20m west of the west wall of the stables is a sandstone grotto, its arched recess lined with flints and ammonites. At its north end the lawn terminates in a sandstone rockery planted with shrubs and small ornamental trees. Immediately north of the north range of the stables, between the pinetum and the east front lawn, high red-brick walls (listed grade II) enclose a rectangular 70m x 38m formal garden, shown established on the estate plan of 1812 as two, north and south, courtyards. The present single, walled rectangle, shown on the OS map of 1876, consists of lawns edged with herbaceous borders with a rectangular lily pool, recorded as a fountain on the 3rd edition OS map, as the focus at the north end of the lawn and a tazza on a plinth at the south end. Three archways in the west wall, which has a pump (listed grade I) on its west side, form entrances to the formal garden from the pinetum. A glasshouse against the north wall shown on OS 25″ maps between 1876 and 1939 has now (1997) gone.
PARK The parkland surrounds the house and gardens on all sides. To north and south on the central plateau and on the gentle eastern slopes below the house it is fairly open in character, almost entirely laid to permanent pasture and dotted with clumps and individual trees of mixed age and species. Some 160m south-east of the house remnants of a short avenue of oak and chestnut which connected the present main drive with the drive from the north-east (shown on Greenwood’s map of 1819-20) forms a linear plantation, at the north end of which is a grassed icehouse mound with a flint-faced entrance wall. To the north-east of the house, the scatter of trees is of greater variety, with several exotics such as Wellingtonia and acacia mixed with chestnut, oak, and lime. North of the formal gardens, a chestnut-lined drive leading north to Little Belmont (just outside the site boundary) passes Park House and remnants of an orchard shown in existence in 1871 (OS 1876). Northwards again the drive passes the eastern edge of the open grassed site of the former cricket field, laid out by the fourth Lord Harris in 1870 and in use until the 1950s.
West of the house the grassed plateau contains only a sparse scatter of individual trees. Beyond, on the steep upper slopes which fall towards Stalisfield Road on the western boundary is the site of a former beech hanger, planted c 1780 (ring counts) and destroyed in the storm of 1987. West and north-west of the hanger site are mixed plantations, planted as game cover in the C19, extended southwards in the C20 (OS 1908), and extensively replanted after the 1987 storm.
The OS drawing of 1801 shows a small park at Belmont to the east of the house containing fenced tree clumps and surrounded by fields. By 1819-20, Greenwood’s map shows the park extending west of the house to the edge of the beech hanger and northwards to the present boundary. The area in the south-west corner, between the principal drive and New York Cottage, which has its steep west-facing slopes planted with two lines of beech pollards. By 1871 (OS 1876) the parkland had been extended north of the present boundary as far as Deadman’s and Wilderton Woods. In C20, this area was turned over to farming and forestry and part of it was developed in the 1920s as the present (1997) golf course.
KITCHEN GARDEN The kitchen garden lies immediately to the north-west of the ornamental gardens. Built by General Harris from 1805 to 1808 and shown on the estate plan of 1812 (Haslam 1995), it is roughly triangular in shape. The garden, which covers an area of c 0.5ha, is enclosed by red-brick walls with glasshouses built against the internal south-west-facing wall; it is at present (1997) in an uncultivated state. Further fenced enclosures, laid out to soft fruit and, on the south side, flower borders and nut trees, surround the garden.
REFERENCES
E Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent (1797-1801) [Facsimile edn 1972], p 447 Country Life, 117 (27 January 1955), pp 246-9; (3 February 1955), pp 318-21 J Newman, The Buildings of England: West Kent and the Weald (1969), pp 134-5 J Phibbs, Belmont Park, (HBAC Gardens Sub-committee report 1988) C Haslam, The Prospect Tower, (Landmark Trust c 1995) Belmont, guidebook, (Belmont 1997)
Maps Estate sale plan, 1779 (private collection) W Mudge, Map of Kent, 1″ to 1 mile, 1801 Estate map, c 1802-03 (private collection) Estate map, 1812 (private collection) C Greenwood, Map of the County of Kent from an actual survey made in the years 1819 and 1820, c 1″ to 1 mile, 1821
OS Surveyor’s drawing, 2″ to 1 mile, 1801 (British Library Maps) OS 6″ to 1 mile: 1st edition surveyed 1866-71, published 1876 2nd edition published 1898 3rd edition published 1908 OS 25″ to 1 mile: 1st edition surveyed 1871, published 1876 2nd edition published 1898 3rd edition published 1907
Archival items Family Diaries (private collection) [quoted in Haslam 1995]
Description written: October 1997 Register Inspector: VCH Edited: November 2003
Throwley CPME13 0HJ01-May-86TQ 98312 56532
1281708NEW YORK COTTAGEC18CottageIIand the following description for:
THROWLEY BELMONT
New York Cottage
should be amended to read:
Cottage pair, now house. Circa 1790, probably designed by Colonel Montresor of Belmont, a retired engineer with the British Army in North America in Amercian Colonial style. Timber framed with painted infill with plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with garret above that. Verandah on 3 sides, of 5 bays to return sides, 7 bays to front, octagonal posts and shallow arcade. Half-hipped roof with 2 shallow pedimented dormers and central stack. 2 glazing bar sashes with shutters on ground floor and central door of 6 panels with modillion eaves cornice surround. Built as estate cottage for Belmont, and illustrated in Plaw’s “Ferme Ornee” (1795). (See BOE Kent II, 1983, 477).
THROWLEY BELMONT New York Cottage
Cottage pair, now house. Circa 1790. By John Plaw, in American colonial style. Timber framed with painted brick infill with plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with garret above that. Verandah on 3 sides, of 5 bays to return sides, 7 bays to front; octagonal posts and shallow arcade. Half-hipped roof with 2 shallow pedimented dormers and central stack. Two glazing bar sashes with shutters on ground floor and central door of 6 panels with modillion eaves cornice surround. Built as estate cottages for Belmont, and illustrated in Plaw’s “Ferme 0rnée” (1795). (See BOE Kent II, 1983, 477).
Throwley CPME13 0HJ24-Jan-67TQ 98225 56177
1343978BELMONT, WITH STABLE COURTYARD AND PUMPC18HouseIThe description for:-
4/156 Belmont, with stable courtyard and pump 24.1.67
should be amended to read:-
House, courtyard and water pump. First house built 1769 for Edward Wilkes, store- keeper of Royal Powder Mills, Faversham. Remodelled and extended c.1787-1792. Unsigned drawings for the rebuilding of Belmont appear to be from the office of Samuel Wyatt and it is possible that the owner Colonel Montresor, a retired engineer with the British Army in North America may have designed the house but engaged Samuel Wyatt as his architectural advisor. Interior work by Basil Ionides. 1930s. Red brick, the main elevations of the house faced with buff-coloured gauged mathematical tiles, with Coade-stone and ashlar details. Slated roofs. The house is placed asymmetrically at the south and south-west corner of the stable courtyard and the internal arrangements set asymmetrically to an axial corridor. Neo- classical styling. Entrance (south front): 2 storeys and attic on plinth with guilloche plat band and modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof. 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 3 tripartite french windows, only the left end one genuine and the main entrance to the house. Set with a verandah of 3 bays on Ionic columns coupled to centre (with Coade-stone capitals), with G full height glazing bar sashes, separated by Doric pilasters, with cornice. Gauged niches to left and right with Coade-stoneswags on plaque over them, one dated 1790. Kitchen buildings in red brick beyond. East front (the display front): 2 storeys and attic on plinths with guilloched plat band and modillion eaves cornice. Two projecting bows left and right with saucer domes and belvederes. 3 glazing bar sashes on each floor in each bow, and 3 on each floor in centre. Over each window a Coade-stone plaque or medallion with swags, putti and emblems of the seasons. The central plaque depicts a figure of India on an artillery bastion studying plans of Belmont, an elevation of which appears in the background amongst palm trees. North front: as entrance front, but with 4 bay verandah of single columns, and bowed projection with tripartite “Wyatt” window, the cast iron balustrade carried across. Single storey range extends to north part of the courtyard, but also containing rooms for the main house. Stable courtyard: of chequered brick and slate to north of house, containing part of surviving 1769 house to south. 2 storeys on plinth with moulded cornice, 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 4 on ground floor with central boarded door, with flat hood on pilaster surround. Stables with elliptically arched door- ways and sidelights, echoing the Wyatt window motif of the main house. Coach-house with clock tower and cupola, dated 1792. Entrance to courtyard flanked by octagonal lodges in buff brick, with gauged niches, 1 glazing bar sash to entrance, and panelled door to courtyard. Hand pump attached to west range of courtyard, with wooden box-body, and leaded spout dated 1790, curved handle with knop, and iron water trough. Interior: entrance vestibule, staircase hall and corridor form axis of house. Full height top-lit staircase, with first floor balcony, and second floor balcony reached only from back stairs. Cast iron balustrade. Shallow well niches on the walls enhance the use of the stairhallas a gallery. Screen to upstairs corridor of 2 Ionic columns, in antis with elliptical arch over,and identical blank screen on the opposite wall. This, with simplified details, along with the apse, forms the decorative motif for the whole interior. Main rooms to east of central axis, with drawing room and library occupying the bows of the east front, and internally with apsidal walls, with central dining room. Library with fitted veneered bookcases, again in “Wyatt window” configuration, gilded cornice and moulded frieze, with medallions and plaques on the wallpaper frieze. Spare decorative details elsewhere, light architraves and frieze, wall panelling, marble fire surrounds. Fitted shutters and pierglasses to bowed windows, and fitted wall niches in bedrooms. Study, office and billiard room isolated from main range along east wing of courtyard. Service rooms complete; half-glazed roof on orangery, again with apsidal end walls. Orangery and service wing with series of fine vaulted cellars, ascribed to 1769 house, but quality of design and workmanship is more akin to the Wyatt house. Below the main house runs an original hypocaust central heating system, stoked externally on the north front of the main house. (See Country Life, Jan 27 and Feb 3, 1955; see also BOE, Kent II, 1983, 138-9).
House, courtyard and water pump. First house built 1769 for Edward Wilkes, Storekeeper of Royal Powder Mills, Faversham. Remodelled and extended c.1787-1792 by Samuel Wyatt for General Lord Harris. Interior work by Basil Ionides, 1930s. Red brick, the main elevations of the house faced with buff- coloured gauged mathematical tiles, with Coade-stone and ashlar details. Slated roofs. The house is placed asymmetrically at the south and south-east corner of the stable courtyard and the internal arrangements set asymmetrically to an axial corridor. Neo-classical styling. Entrance (south front): 2 storeys and attic on plinth with guilloche plat band and modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 3 tripartite french windows, only the left end one genuine and the main entrance to the house. Set with a verandah of 3 bays on Ionic columns coupled to centre [with Coade-stone capitals), with 6 full height glazing bar sashes, separated by Doric pilasters, with cornice. Gauged niches to left and right with Coade-stone swags on plaques over them, one dated 1790. Kitchen buildings in red brick beyond. East front (the display front): 2 storeys and attic on plinths with guilloched plat band and modillion eaves cornice. Two projecting bows left and right with saucer domes and belvederes. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor in each bow, and 3 on each floor in centre. Over each window a Coade-stone plaque or medallion with swags, putti and emblems of the seasons. The central plaque depicts a figure of India on an artillery bastion studying plans of Belmont, an elevation of which appears in the background amongst palm trees. North front: as entrance front, but with 4 bay verandah of single columns, and bowed projection with tripartite “Wyatt” window, the cast iron balustrade carried across. Single storey range extends to north part of the courtyard, but also containing rooms for the main house. Stable courtyard: of chequered brick and slate to north of house, containing part of surviving 1769 house to south. 2 storeys on plinth with moulded cornice, 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 4 on ground floor with central boarded door, with flat hood on pilaster surround. Stables with elliptically arched doorways and sidelights, echoing the Wyatt window motif of the main house. Coach house with clock tower and cupola, dated 1792. Entrance to courtyard flanked by octagonal lodges in buff brick, with gauged niches, 1 glazing bar sash to entrance, and panelled door to courtyard. Hand pump attached to west range of courtyard, with wooden box body, and leaded spout dated 1790, curved handle with knop, and iron water trough. Interior: entrance vestibule, staircase hall and corridor form axis of house. Full height top-lit stair- case, with first floor balcony, and second floor balcony reached only from back stairs. Cast iron balustrade. Shallow well niches on the walls enhance the use of the stairhall as a gallery. Screen to upstairs corridor of 2 Ionic columns, in antis with elliptical arch over, and identical blank screen on opposite wall. This, with simplified details, along with the apse, forms the decorative motif for the whole interior. Main rooms to east of central axis, with drawing room and library occupying the bows of the east front, and internally with apsidal walls, with central dining room. Library with fitted veneered book- cases, again in “Wyatt window” configuration, gilded cornice and moulded frieze, with medallions and plaques on the wall- paper frieze. Spare decorative details elsewhere, light architraves and frieze, wall panelling, marble fire surrounds. Fitted shutters and pierglasses to bowed windows, and fitted wall niches in bedrooms. Study, office and billiard room isolated from main range along east wing of courtyard. Service rooms complete; half-glazed roof on orangery, again with apsidal end walls. Orangery and service wing with series of fine vaulted cellars, ascribed to 1769 house, but quality of design and workmanship is more akin to the Wyatt house. Below the main house runs an original hypocaust central heating system, stoked externally on the north front of the main house. (See Country Life, Jan 27 and Feb 3, 1955; see also BOE, Kent II, 1983, 138-9)
Throwley CPME13 0HJ24-Jan-67TQ 98586 56362
1069175HOCKLEY HOUSEC15HouseIIThis List entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 14/06/2017
THROWLEY, CHURCH ROAD (east side), Hockley House
(Formerly listed as: OLD HOCKLEY ROAD (east side) Hockley Cottage)
(Previously listed as Black Cottage)
House. C15. Timber-framed and exposed with painted brick infill and weatherboarded, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with small panel framing and returned jetty to right on dragon posts. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre left and rear right. Two wooden casements on first floor, three on ground floor with central boarded door in four centred arched surround. Catslide outshots to left and right. The left-hand bays are later additions, encroaching upon the jettied right-hand bay, which was originally separately roofed and hipped to face to right return.
Throwley CPME13 0HL24-Jan-67TQ 98020 55026
1069203GRANARY 30 METRES EAST OF DERBIES COURTC18GranaryIIHouse. Early C19. Flint with red brick dressings and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to rear left and rear right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with rectangular fanlight, and cornice hood on attached Doric columns.Stalisfield CPME13 0HN28-Aug-86TQ 95958 54155
1203256HOLBEAM COTTAGEC17HouseIIHouse. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic, corbelled cornice to roof with stacks to left and right and 2 hipped dormers. Regular fenestration of 2 wooden casements on each floor, with segmental heads on ground floor. Central panelled and glazed door with flat hood. Outshot at right.Stalisfield CPME13 0HN28-Aug-86TQ 96214 54251
1203276BARN 40 METRES SOUTH EAST OF DERBIES COURTC17BarnII6/136 Barn 4 metres 24.1.67 south east of Derbies Court
Barn. C17. Timber framed on brick and flint plinth and weather boarded with corrugated asbestos roof. Half-hipped roof with hipped mid-strey. Queen post roof.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HN24-Jan-67TQ 95953 54141
1343957DERBIES COURTC16HouseII6/135 Derbies Court
House. C16 and C17. Timber framed and part exposed with plaster infill, part clad with painted brick and weather board. Plain tiled roof. Built in 2 sections. Two storeys and jettied end right on dragon post, with roof hipped to right, stepping down and hipped to left. Stacks to rear centre and end left. Irregular fenestration of 5 windows, mixed wooden casements and horizontal sliding sashes. Boarded door to left.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HN27-Aug-52TQ 95949 54180
1281687LITTLE HOCKLEY FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseIIHouse. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and weatherboard with plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and stack to left centre. Three wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor with segmental heads. Boarded door to left with flat hood on brackets. C20 outshot to left. Interior: originally continu- ously jettied, with dragon beam surviving.Throwley CPME13 0HP28-Aug-86TQ 98094 54945
1203813TONG GREEN FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIITHROWLEY TONG GREEN TQ 95 SE 6/188 Tong Green Farmhouse 24.1.67 GV II
House. C17. Painted brick in English bond and plain tiled roof. Two cell lobby entry plan. Two storeys and garret on plinth with half-hipped roof and central stack of 4 octagonal chimneys clustered around central lozenge-shaped chimney. Two wooden casements on first floor and central stairlight, and 2 segment- headed wooden casements on ground floor. Central ribbed door with flat hood on brackets.
Throwley CPME13 0HR24-Jan-67TQ 97965 54151
1069202HOLBEAM FARMHOUSEC19FarmhouseII6/133 Holbeam Farmhouse 24.1.67 GV II
House. Early C19. Flint with red brick dressings and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to rear left and rear right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with rectangular fanlight, and cornice hood on attached Doric columns.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HS24-Jan-67TQ 97087 54383
1203264BARN AND WHEEL HOUSE 30 METRES EAST OF HOLBEAMC17BarnII6/134 Barn and wheel house 30 metres east of Holbeam
Barn and threshing house. C17 and early C19. Timber framed barn on flint base, weather boarded and flint with plain tiled roof. Wheel house and threshing house of flint with red brick dressings and asphalt roof. Hipped roof to barn with hipped mid-strey. Threshing house, of 2 storeys, at end right, with circular wheel house to rear. Interior: barn of 3 bays and aisles, originally probably of 4 or 5 bays. Passing shores to arcade posts with clasped purlin roof. No machinery remains in threshing house or wheel house.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HS28-Aug-86TQ 97132 54381
1069233HUNTINGFIELDC16ManorII4/3 Huntingfield
Manor house, now house. C16, C18 and early C19. Timber framed and structural red brick part clad with buff coloured mathematical tiles, with plain tiled roofs. Range of four framed bays with 2 C18 service wings added to rear, and early C19 wing added to east end, becoming the new entrance front. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to rear left and right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 4 on ground floor, all with gauged heads. Central door of 6 moulded and fielded panels in heavily moulded and panelled door surround with semi-circular fanlight. Right return: originally the main front, now side front, clad with buff mathematical tiles, with 6 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 5 on ground floor with half-glazed door. Interior: C16 range with heavy frame visible, and moulded beams. Clasped purlin roof with queen posts and wind braces. Refined early C19 interiors in entrance range, with marble fire surrounds and moulded corridor arches. Contemporary four flight open well staircase with ramped handrail and unmoulded balusters. Birth place and early home of Edward Hasted, F.R.S., F.S.A. (1732-1812), historian of Kent, who mentions surrounding foundations of flint and stone belonging to lost chapel and mill, and gives full manorial history (see Hasted, vol. VI, pp 430-431). The estate was in the late C18 linked with Belmont, where buff-coloured mathematical tiling is a major feature.
Eastling CPME13 0HT24-Jan-67TQ 97147 55020
1069204THRESHING BARN 20 METRES WEST OF VALLEY FARM HOUSEC17BarnII6/139 Threshing Barn 20 metres west of Valley Farm House
Threshing barn. C17. Timber framed and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with cart doors to centre. Interior: 3 bays with central threshing floor; clasped purlin roof.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HW28-Aug-86TQ 95625 53987
1203290VALLEY FARM HOUSEC16FarmhouseII6/138 Valley Farm House 24.1.67 GV II
House. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick, with exposed timber frame to rear. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with hipped dormer and stack to rear. Irregular fenestration of wooden casements with boarded door to left of large central brick buttress, and boarded door to left in catslide outshot.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HW24-Jan-67TQ 95659 54004
1343958ROOKS HILL COTTAGEC17HouseIIRooks Hill 6/140 Cottage GV II
House. C17. Timber framed and clad with red brick and tile hung with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on flint plinth and hipped roof with gablet, and stacks to end left and rear left. Two metal casements on first floor, one on ground floor and with wooden casement, and central boarded door. Catslide outshot to rear.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HW28-Aug-86TQ 95656 53959
1281778REDBORO COTTAGEC18SmithyII6/130 Redboro 6.2.74 Cottage
Smithy or kiln, now cottage. C18. Brick, painted and pebble- dashed, with plain tiled roof. Square plan of 1 bay. One storey and attic with hipped dormer and hipped roof. Large projecting and double offset stack to right, and smaller projecting stack to rear right in small outshot. One wooden casement, and boarded door to left.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HX06-Feb-74TQ 95527 53252
1343956OAK COTTAGEC16Wealden HouseII6/131 Oak Cottage 24.1.67 GV II
Wealden hall house, now ceiled. C16. Timber framed and part exposed, part underbuilt and clad with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. Four framed bays. Two storeys with recessed centre and one large brace to flying wall plate at right. Hipped roof with stacks to left and to right. One horizontal sliding sash, 1 glazing bar sash and 1 wooden casement on first floor, 3 wooden casements originally horizontal sashes on ground floor. Ribbed door to centre left in gabled porch.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HX24-Jan-67TQ 95535 53267
1069205THE PLOUGH INNC15Public HouseII6/142 The Plough Inn 27.8.52 GV II
Wealden hall house, now public house. C15 and altered C19. Timber framed and rendered and part clad with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. Four framed bays. Two storeys, originally both end bays jettied, now only right end jettied and returned on dragon post. Central flying wall plate on arched braces and bracket. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to end left, centre left and end right. Two wooden casements and sash to right on first floor, and C19 5 light mullioned window and sash on ground floor, with 2 metal casements to left in projecting catslide outshot. Half glazed door to centre left in hipped porch with cornice. Interior: crown post roof.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HY27-Aug-52TQ 95431 52942
1203310GODWINSC15Wealden HouseII6/143 Godwins 24.1.67 GV II
Wealden hall house, now ceiled. C15, ceiled C16. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill and underbuilt in painted brick with plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys, originally jettied to left and right, now underbuilt, and central hall sealed and re-walled flush with wings, but still exposing arched braces to wall plate. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to end left, centre left and projecting at end right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, 1 on ground floor to left, central tripartite sash, and C19 five- light transomed window to right. Door of 4 panels to left.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HY24-Jan-67TQ 95446 52878
1203314BRISLEY HOUSEC18HouseII6/145 Brisley House II
House. C18. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two storeys. Roof half-hipped to left, hipped to right with central stack. Two wooden casements on first floor and central stair light, and 2 on ground floor with central panelled door. Outshot to right.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HY28-Aug-86TQ 95438 52734
1343993APPLE TREE COTTAGEC17HouseII6/122 Apple Tree Cottage
House. C17 and clad C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick and tile hung with plain tiled roof. One storey and attic, and half-hipped roof with 2 gabled dormers and central stack. Two wooden casements and half-glazed door to left. Garage extension at left, and brick and wooden conservatory at right.
Stalisfield CPME13 0HY28-Aug-86TQ 95531 52846
1343959SHIRE LANE COTTAGEC17HouseII6/144 Shire Lane Cottage
House. C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick, flint and weather board, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with central stack. Two wooden casements to each floor, and plank and stud door in catslide outshot to right.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JA28-Aug-86TQ 95399 52609
1069201BARN 15 METRES NORTH EAST OF GREEN FARMHOUSEC18BarnII6/129 Barn 15 metres north-east of Green Farmhouse II
Barn. C18 or earlier. Timber framed on brick and flint plinth. Weather boarded with plain tiled and hipped roof. Hipped mid- strey. Interior not inspected at survey. Included for group value with Green Farmhouse.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JE28-Aug-86TQ 95538 53078
1203249GREEN FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseII6/128 Green Farm- House
House. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic, corbelled cornice to roof with stacks to left and right and 2 hipped dormers. Regular fenestration of 2 wooden casements on each floor, with segmental heads on ground floor. Central panelled and glazed door with flat hood. Outshot at right.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JE28-Aug-86TQ 95515 53066
1203304FORGE COTTAGEC19HouseII6/141 Forge Cottage II
House. Early C19. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with corbelled brick eaves cornice, central hipped dormer and stack to end left. Two horizontal sliding sashes and central glazing bar wooden casement on first floor, and 1 horizontal sliding sash and 1 wooden casement on ground floor, with central half-glazed door in late C19 wooden and glazed porch. Outshot to left with horizontal sliding sash.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JE28-Aug-86TQ 95493 53160
1069197WOODSELLC17HouseII6/118 Woodsell 24.1.67 GV II
House. C17 and C18. Timber framed and clad with chequered brick, with hung tile, and tile hung rear range. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left and projecting at end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with central glazed door and flat hood on scrolled brackets. Recessed 2 storey late C20 extension to left.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JF24-Jan-67TQ 96208 53072
1281774THE OLD SCHOOL HOUSEC16HouseII6/125 The Old School House
House, C16. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill, part underbuilt with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. Four framed bays and lobby entry plan. Two storeys on flint plinth and hipped roof with stack to centre left. Four wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor, and boarded door to centre left, and ribbed door to right.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JF27-Aug-52TQ 96376 52826
1025295CHURCH OF ST MARYC13ChurchII*6/121 Church of St. Mary
Parish church. C13 and restored 1904. Flint and sandstone with plain tiled roof. Chancel with south chapel, nave with aisles, north tower. Exterior heavily restored, tower topped by weather vane dated 1904, over a wooden belfry with tiled roof.- Three light C15 east window, otherwise C19 fenestration. Double chamfered west doorway. Interior: nave arcades of 2 bays, on square piers with chamfered corners and trefoiled archlet to heavy moulded abaci, Roof of 3 tall crown posts. Single chamfered arch on imposts from chancel to chapel and blocked arch to demolished north chapel. Double chamfered chancel arch. Fittings: trefoil headed piscina in chancel. Rood screen:C15 perpendicular. Five bays, each with four-light traceried openings- with crenellated oblique transoms. Vine motif frieze above blank tracery on lower panels, with angels, eagles and roses in spandrels. Attached shafts support frieze of Tudor flowers with renewed cove. C13 font on 5 shafts with 4 blank arches on each side of bowl. Royal coat of arms (obscured at time of survey) carved in high relief on nave south wall. (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 465 and illus. 65.)
Stalisfield CPME13 0JG24-Jan-67TQ 96738 52434
1069199STABLES 20 METRES WEST OF HEEL FARMHOUSEC18StablesII6/124 Stables 20 metres west of Heel Farmhouse
Stables, sometime oast. C18. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Half-hipped roof and 2 half-doors to left, one to right. Interior: end left bay oast house, with hop press over, and partial remains of kiln to rear. Clasped purlin roof.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JH28-Aug-86TQ 97597 53058
1203237HEEL FARMC16FarmII6/123 Heel Farm
House. Late C16 and clad C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick with plain tiled roof. L-shaped plan. Two storeys on plinth with plat band and box eaves to hipped roof with gablets and stacks to rear right and rear left. Three sashes and 1 blank window space to centre right on first floor, and 3 segment headed sashes on ground floor. Boarded door to centre left with rectangular fanlight and raking trellised hood. Interior: much internal detail survives; moulded door surrounds stopped with quirk and tongue, with strap hinges; moulded beams and ceiling joists; wainscotting.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JH28-Aug-86TQ 97620 53040
1069198RUSHMERE FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseII6/120 Rushmere Farmhouse
House. Early C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with pilaster strips flanking central bay and whole front. Brick cornice to half hipped roof with 2 hipped dormers and stacks projecting to end left and end right. Five wooden casements on first floor and 4 on ground floor. Central ribbed door with flat hood on brackets. Interior: foundations and cellars remain from earlier building. Early C18 details to doorways, joists and fire surrounds.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JJ24-Jan-67TQ 97809 52280
1069177SNOAD STREET COTTAGEC16HouseII6/170 Snoad Street Cottage
House. C16. Timber framed and close-studded with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and continuous jetty with hipped roof and gablets and stack to centre right. Four leaded wooden casements on first floor, and 2 4-light transomed windows with sidelights on ground floor. Plank and stud door in four centred arched surround to left. Outshot to left.
Throwley CPME13 0JN28-Aug-86TQ 99128 52219
1203485SNOAD STREET MANORC13HouseII*6/169 Snoad Street Manor 27.8.52 II*
House. C15 or earlier and early C17. Rendered brick and plain tiled roof. C17 range with rear wing partly surviving from late Medieval house. Two storeys with basement and attic on plinth with moulded string course, cornice and hipped roof with gablets, 3 gabled dormers, double diagonal stacks at end left, stacks to rear right and end right. Two 3 light wooden casements with brick mullioned sidelights on each floor to left of 2 storey crow-step gabled porch, with 1 wooden casement and moulded brick label, and 1 wooden casement on each floor to right of the porch, the upper with a small cornice. Panelled door in porch at head of 3 steps. Right return: earlier range, rendered with irregular fenestration, and 2 storey porch with chamfered round headed arch and plank and stud doorway. Interior: cellars remain possibly from C13 structure. Plastered ceiling with ribs, cherubs and roses, and stone fireplace with ornamented overmantel. (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 477.)
Throwley CPME13 0JN27-Aug-52TQ 99212 52434
1069184OLD WORKHOUSEC17HouseIITHROWLEY WORKHOUSE ROAD TQ 95 SE (north side) 6/192 Old Workhouse
House. C17 and C18. Timber framed and underbuilt with red brick and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys with stacks projecting at end left and end right. Four wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor, and half-glazed door to left in gabled porch. Rear range, earlier, with half-hipped roof.
Throwley CPME13 0JP28-Aug-86TQ 99375 54530
1343955PARSONAGE FARMC16FarmII6/126 Parsonage Farm
House. C16 and clad C17 with C19 additions. Timber framed and clad with painted brick in English bond with plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof, 2 hipped dormers, large central stack and stack to end left. Four wooden casements on each floor, that to end left in C19 additional bay. Ribbed and panelled door to centre. Catslide outshot to rear.
Stalisfield CPME13 0JQ28-Aug-86TQ 95956 52153
1069174CROOKED COTTAGEC15HouseIITHROWLEY BETHEL ROW Crooked Cottage
(Formerly listed as Yew Tree House, BETHEL ROAD (east side))
House. C15. Timber framed, exposed in 1 bay with painted brick infill, the rest clad with painted brick, with plain tiled roof. One storey and attic on plinth with roof gabled to left and hipped to right with 2 raking dormers and central stack. Five wooden casements and boarded door to centre right with flat hood. End left bay C20 addition.
Throwley CPME13 0JR28-Aug-86TQ 99832 54156
1281672SOUTH HILL FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII6/162 South Hill Farmhouse
House. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and weatherboard with plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and stack to left centre. Three wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor with segmental heads. Boarded door to left with flat hood on brackets. C20 outshot to left. Interior: originally continu- ously jettied, with dragon beam surviving.
Throwley CPME13 0JR28-Aug-86TQ 99691 54051
1343980BARN 30 METRES NORTH OF SOUTH HILL FARMHOUSEC17BarnII4/158 Ha-ha and gates 50 metres east of Belmont II Ha-ha and gates. C18. Yellow stock brick and wrought iron gates. Ha-ha – four feet deep, extending approx. 200 yards on east side of Belmont, with 2 sets wrought iron gates, on hollow iron piers, with 3 feet high side fences extending approx. 10 feet either side of gate.Throwley CPME13 0JR28-Aug-86TQ 99693 54076
1069207BELL’S FORSTALL FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII6/148 Bell’s Forstal Farmhouse
House. C16. Timber framed and plastered with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and continuous jetty on brackets with hipped roof and stacks offset and projecting to end left and end right, and to rear centre and rear right. Three tripartite glazing bar sashes and 1 glazing bar sash to centre left on first floor, and 3 canted bay windows on ground floor with boarded door to centre left.
Throwley CPME13 0JS24-Jan-67TQ 99395 53584
1069208THE OLD COTTAGEC18HouseII6/150 The Old Cottage
House. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and stack to centre left. Three wooden casements on each floor and ribbed door with side- light to centre left.
Throwley CPME13 0JS28-Aug-86TQ 99330 53647
1069209BARNS 20 METRES SOUTH OF THE OLD COTTAGEC18BarnIIHouse. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and stack to centre left. Three wooden casements on each floor and ribbed door with side- light to centre left.Throwley CPME13 0JS28-Aug-86TQ 99313 53640
1281711BARN 30 METRES NORTH OF BELL’S FORSTAL FARMHOUSEC18BarnIIBarn 6/149 30 metres north of Bell’s Forstal Farmhouse
Barn. C18 or earlier. Timber framed and weather boarded on brick base. Hipped corrugated iron roof, with evidence of removed hipped mid strey to the south. Steel double doors to west. Interior not inspected. Included for group value with Bell’s Forstal Farmhouse.
Throwley CPME13 0JS28-Aug-86TQ 99431 53642
1203455BROOMFIELD FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII7/164 Broomfield Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
House. C17. Painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with triple diagonally set stacks to left and stack projecting at end right. Central 2 storey projecting gable. Three light brick mullioned window in gable, 2 wooden casements on first floor, and 2 glazing bar sashes on ground floor of main range. Boarded door in central projection. Two storey gabled extension to left.
Throwley CPME13 0JU24-Jan-67TR 00327 52895
1069930HARROW HOUSEC18HouseII3/88 Harrow House
House. C18 exterior. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets. Stack to centre left. Three wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor with segmental heads. Boarded door to centre right, and blocked segmental headed opening at left. Brick buttresses to centre and right.
Badlesmere CPME13 0JX10-Nov-86TR 00941 53112
1069924HALLS BOTTOM COTTAGEC16HouseII3/77 Halls Bottom Cottage
House. C16. Timber framed and rough cast, the framing exposed on rear front with red brick nogging. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets and large free-standing and offset stack at right. Three wooden casements on first floor and 2 on ground floor with central boarded door in trellised and gabled porch.
Badlesmere CPME13 0LA10-Nov-86TR 02374 54154
1363414STRINGMANS FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII3/76 Stringmans Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
House. C15 to C18. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick and plaster infill and part weatherboarded to left, with structural brick extension to right. Three framed bays and additional brick bay. Two storeys on flint plinth,large panel framing and tension braces, with end jetty to left, and sceond and third bays to right jettied on dragon posts. Hipped roof with gablets and stack to centre right. Three wooden casements on each floor and boarded door to right of stack. Slightly projecting brick extension to right, 1 storey and attic, with 2 hipped dormers, 1 wooden casement and french doors. Rear front: continuous jetty.
Badlesmere CPME13 0LA24-Jan-67TR 02539 54326
1054032FISHER STREET FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII3/91 Fisher Street Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
House. C16 and C18. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill, and extended in painted brick and rubble. Plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys, small panel framing, with continuous jetty on dragon posts and hipped roof with gablets and stacks to left and projecting at end right. Two storey projecting gabled porch at left, originally jettied at first floor, and a later addition to the house. Irregular fenestration of sash windows with mullioned window to right on first floor, and canted brick bay on ground floor. Boarded door in porch. Recessed wing to left with 1 tripartite sash on each floor. Interior: dragon beams, evidence of jettying predating additional porch; Inglenook fireplaces; flint and brick lined cellar.
Badlesmere CPME13 0LB24-Jan-67TR 02800 54429
1363415LITTLE FISHER STREET HOUSEC17HouseII3/92 Little Fisher Street House
House. C17 and late C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. L-shaped plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with projecting stacks at end left and end right. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes on each floor the upper with moulded aprons. Central half-glazed door with segmental head. Rear wing C17 with casement windows, and dated 1651 (Kent Life, March 1983).
Sheldwich CPME13 0LB10-Nov-86TR 03044 54360
1000388LEES COURTC18Country HouseIIFormal gardens laid out in 1908 by Thomas H Mawson, round a country house set in parkland which retains traces of an extensive early C18 formal layout.
HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT
Lees Court was built in 1652 on the site of an earlier house, by Sir George Sondes whose family had bought the estate in 1600. The front of the house is said by Newman (1983) to have been after a design by Inigo Jones. Sir George was made Earl of Feversham shortly before his death in 1677, and was succeeded in the estate and title by his son-in-law, Louis, Lord Duras of Holdenby. By the early C18 the house had been surrounded by an extensive arrangement of formal gardens, presumably at the direction of Duras, and these are recorded in engravings by Kip and by Badeslade (both in Harris 1719). When Duras died in 1709, the Lees Court estate passed to his late wife’s sister, Sir George Sondes’ younger daughter. She was married to Lewis Watson, Lord Rockingham, who was created Earl of Rockingham in 1714. On his grandson Thomas Watson, 3rd Earl of Rockingham’s death in 1746 Lees Court was inherited by a cousin, Lewis Monson, who took the additional name of Watson and was later raised to the peerage as Baron Sondes. Towards the end of the C18 Sir John Soane was commissioned to build new stables, estate offices, and a dairy at a time when changes were underway in the park. In the first decade of the C20 the C17 house was badly damaged by a fire and the Sondes family employed the architects Edward Hoare and Montagu Wheeler to rebuild it. In 1908 Mrs Gerald Leigh, who had leased the estate from Lord Sondes, commissioned Thomas H Mawson (1861-1933), assisted by Robert Atkinson to lay out formal gardens beneath the south-east front. Although leased at times throughout its history, Lees Court remained in the ownership of the Sondes family until the mid 1970s when it was sold to a developer and divided into flats. The site remains (2000) in divided ownership.
DESCRIPTION
LOCATION, AREA, BOUNDARIES, LANDFORM, SETTING Lees Court occupies a rural location on the east side of the A251, Faversham to Ashford road, c 5km to the south of Faversham. The village of Sheldwich Lees lies beyond the north-west boundary of the park, while the south-west boundary is formed by Lees Court Road. Farmland lies along the northern boundary, with Winding Hill and the village of Hogben’s Hill beyond the north-east corner of the site. To the east lies farmland and woodland and to the south the boundary is formed by Fisher Street Road. The house stands slightly west of centre within the 160ha site on the eastern edge of a level plateau, the land falling to the east and forming a deep, narrow valley which runs north to south through the site.
ENTRANCES AND APPROACHES Lees Court is approached from Lees Court Road beside the Gate House located c 450m to the south-west of the house. The entrance is marked by a pair of early C19 wrought-iron gates and railings (listed grade II), probably brought to the site as part of the early C20 improvements. The drive runs east through the park and then turns north-east to run between the house and the stable yard before arriving at the entrance court below the north-east front. A second entrance, beside the small, late C18 rustic lodge (possibly designed by Sir John Soane, listed grade II) stands at Hogben’s Hill, c 1.3km to the north-east of the house. The drive from this lodge is no longer in use (2000). Probably laid out in the late C18 at the time the lodge was built, it entered the park at its north-east tip and led through Winding Hill Wood to join with the west drive south of the house.
PRINCIPAL BUILDING Lees Court (listed grade I) is a large country house of rendered brick, with pilaster bases and capitals, under a slate roof. It is constructed of two storeys, following a pre C17 plan around a courtyard and has thirteen bays separated by giant Ionic pilasters. The house was completed in c 1652 for Sir George Sondes and the entrance front, at that time on the south-west, was thought to be after a design by Inigo Jones (Newman 1983). Following a fire in the first decade of the C20, the house was reconstructed by Edward Hoare and Montagu Wheeler, at which time the entrance front was moved to the north-east. In the 1970s Lees Court was converted into a number of private residences.
Just beyond the north-west front of the house stands the Dairy Court (listed grade II) comprising a dairy building and estate offices, now (2001) flats. The red-brick and slate-roofed courtyard is entered via an elliptical arch with large pediment above it, situated on the north-east side. The high walls to the north-west are connected to the Stable Yard (listed grade II) which is also converted into flats. These buildings were added by Sir John Soane (1753-1837) for the Sondes family, the Stable Yard dating from 1786 and the Dairy Court from 1790.
GARDENS AND PLEASURE GROUNDS The gardens lie principally below the south-east front. A flagstone terrace beside the house leads onto a sunken rose garden focused on a stone fountain surrounded by seats sheltered by blocks of yew. Beyond is a yew-hedged tennis court and to the south-west is a smaller sunken garden and lily pond. These formal gardens were laid out in 1908 by Thomas Mawson, assisted by Robert Atkinson. In the early C18 there had been a walled entrance court beyond the south-west front of the house and an extensive formal layout of gardens to the east, but this had been replaced by an informal arrangement of lawns and shrubs by the end of the C19.
To the west of the house, between the stables and the boundary with Sheldwich Lees are the remains of a wooded pleasure ground.
PARK To the north, south-west, and south the house is surrounded by level parkland, the majority of which remains under grass, apart from the north-west corner which is under arable. The park is crossed by what remains of the system of early C18 avenues which once radiated out from the gardens into the surrounding deer park and which are shown in the Badeslade engraving (Harris 1719).
The park also extends the length of the valley east of the house, from Hogben’s Hill in the north to Fisher Street Road along the southern boundary.
KITCHEN GARDEN The former kitchen garden, now (2001) developed for private housing, is situated c 450m to the west-north-west of the house, outside the area here registered. It lies on the edge of the village of Sheldwich Lees and had been used as a nursery before the housing was built. The OS map of 1872 shows it linked to the stables by a band of pleasure grounds.
REFERENCES
J Harris, The History of Kent (1719), p 280 T Badeslade, Thirty six different views of noblemen and gentlemen’s seats in the county of Kent (1750s), pl 23 J P Neale, Views of the seats, 2nd series 4, (1828) T H Mawson, The Art and Craft of Garden Making (1912) Country Life, 52 (12 August 1922), pp 178-83; (19 August 1922), pp 210-16 G Jekyll, Garden Ornament (1927) T H Mawson, The life and work of an English landscape architect (1927) J Newman, The Buildings of England: North East and East Kent (1983), pp 370-1
Maps T H Mawson, Plan of gardens at Lees Court, 1908 (reproduced in Mawson 1912, p 101)
OS 6″ to 1 mile: 1st edition published 1872
Description written: April 2001 Amended: May 2001 Register Inspector: EMP Edited: November 2003
This list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 21/08/2018
Badlesmere CPME13 0LD01-Mar-89TR 02338 54936
1054748WOODS COURTC16ManorII3/89 Woods Court 24.1.67 GV II
Manor house. C16 and clad c.1759. Timber framed and clad with flint and banded red brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on flint plinth with red brick quoins. Hipped roof. Large moulded stack to left, later single stack to right. Five mullioned wooden casements, on first floor, 3 on ground floor with transoms. Rib and stud door to centre right in arched double chamfered brick surround. Interior: possible remains of screens passage. Plastered overmantel in form of Lombard Frieze. Moulded beams supported on corbels.
Badlesmere CPME13 0LD10-Nov-86TR 02617 54632
1069931BARN 30 METRES WEST OF WOODS COURTC18BarnII3/90 Barn 30 metres west of Woods Court
Barn. Early C18. Timber framed and weatherboarded with corrugated iron roof. Half-hipped roof with raking mid-strey. Interior: 4 bays with aisles. Quadrant braces to arcade posts and clasped purlin roof. Included for group value with Woods Court.
Badlesmere CPME13 0LD10-Nov-86TR 02578 54616
1069897GATES ABOUT 5 METRES EAST OF THE GATE HOUSE (T.R. 016559)C19Gates and railingsII1/119 Gates about 5 metres east of The Gate House (T.R. 016559)
Gates and rails. Early C19. Wrought iron. Open work piers with coping topped by heraldic Lions rampant. Between them a gate of 2 tier rails with fleur-de-lys heads. Rails to left and right of similar pattern, finished approximately 10 feet by coped piers. Gateway to Lees Court.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LG10-Nov-86TR 01693 55879
1069899MILESTONE AT TR 013 581C18Mile StoneIIThe following buildings shall be added to the list:
(F 111) 1/123 Milestone at TR 013 581
Milestone. Mid C18. Stone, about 1½ feet high, with attached metal plate embossed: FEVERSHAM 2 ASHFORD 11
The Faversham, Hythe and Canterbury Turnpike was licensed 1762; the old spelling of FEVERSHAM suggests this stone was set up soon after. Within 3 feet of the toll gate lodge.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LN01-Sep-89TR 01374 58102
1069919MAYBANKC19HouseII1/69 Maybank
House. Early C19. Red brick and asbestos tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to rear left and end right. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes on each floor, with segmental heads on ground floor, and central door of 4 panels with flat hood on brackets on 3 steps and half landing with iron rail urn-finial principals.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LN10-Nov-86TR 01375 58065
1069921NORTH STREET FARMHOUSEC19FarmhouseII1/72 North Street Farmhouse
House. Early C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with gambrel roof, 3 raking dormers and stacks at end left and end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor all with gauged heads. Central panelled door, the top glazed,in moulded and fluted surround with projecting cornice. Outshot to left.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LN10-Nov-86TR 01335 58023
1363413TOLLGATE HOUSEC18Toll HouseII1/73 Tollgate House
Toll house now house. Late C18. Timber framed and clad with rendered tile hanging and extended with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. One storey with hipped roof and stack to left. Three glazing bar sashes with 1 metal casement in extension to right. Central boarded door.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LN10-Nov-86TR 01369 58093
1069920HALKE COTTAGESC15HouseII1/70 Nos.1&2 Halke Cottages
House, now 2 cottages. C15. Timber framed and part exposed with painted brick infill, part weatherboarded, right return clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Hall house with separately roofed parlour and service wings. Two storeyed wings left and right to central range of one storey and attic, end wings originally jettied, now underbuilt. Hipped roofs, returned on wings with gablets. One gabled dormer. Stack cluster to centre left, and projecting and offset stack at end right. Irregular fenestration of wooden casements. Rib and stud door to left, boarded door to right. Rear: the original entrance front, obscured by outshots, but with jetty and dragon posts revealed. Interior: the wing to right with ogee bracing to hall range and 2 four centred arched doorways to hall range. Crown post roofs. House described as ‘early’ and ‘rare’ (See B.0:E. Kent II, 1983, 460).
Sheldwich CPME13 0LR10-Nov-86TR 01417 57819
13634128, ASHFORD ROADC16HouseIINos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.Sheldwich CPME13 0LS10-Nov-86TR 01280 57853
1069083THE STOCKS (STOCKS GARAGE)C16HouseII1/56 The Stocks (Stocks Garage)
House. C16. Timber framed, part exposed close-studding with plaster infill part clad to left with painted brick, to right with painted brick and weatherboard. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with jetty to centre right and projecting castslide outshot to right. Hipped roof with stacks to rear left, rear centre and front right. Irregular fenestration of 3 wooden casements on each floor. C20 flat roofed extension with plate glass shop windows to left. Boarded door and wooden casement under single segmental head to centre and boarded door in extension to right. Also at some time a garage and a public house.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LU10-Nov-86TR 01088 56687
1363441THE POST OFFICE AND COTTAGE ATTACHEDC18House and shopII1/120 The Post Office and Cottage attached
House and shop. Early C18. Chequered red and blue brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys in 2 builds – the end left bay a later addition. Plinth, plat band and moulded eaves cornice. Roof with stacks at centre left and end right and 2 hipped dormers. Two wooden casements with central blank panel on first floor, and 2 segmental headed wooden casements with shutters on ground floor. Boarded door with flat hood. This symmetrical facade extended by 1 bay to left, with 1 wooden casement and boarded door, both with segmental heads. Single storey post office extension to right with boarded door.
Sheldwich CPME13 0LY10-Nov-86TR 01292 56442
1298858STABLE YARDC18StablesII1/99 Stable Yard 24,1.57 GV II
Stables, now flats. 1786. By Sir John Soane. Red brick and slated roof. Built round a square quadrangle. Single storey ranges on plinth with plat band and box eaves. Recessed semi-circular glazing bar sashes and half-glazed doors. Entrance block: 2 storeyed, with central carriage arch, and clock tower over. Hipped roof. Glazing bar sashes on first floor, tripartite semi-circular headed glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Carriage house: opposite the entrance block one and half storeys, with central carriage opening in elliptical arched recess, and large semi- circular glazing bar sashes. The continuous painted plat band and cornice, recessed windows and doors, and small first storey sashes unite the whole, very geometrically based design.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NE24-Jan-67TR 01962 56131
1372009THE OLD BAKERYC17HouseII1/114 The Old Bakery
10.2.76 II
House. Late C17. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges, one set back and joined by cross-range. Two storeys and half- hipped roofs, that to left projecting forward, with stacks to left and end right. One segmental headed wooden casements in each gable-end floor, and boarded half door in catslide outshot to left. The arrangement of the 2 wings possibly reflects an originally separate house and bakehouse.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NF10-Feb-76TR 01487 56290
1040074YEW TREE COTTAGEC16CottageII1/111 Yew Tree Cottage (formerly listed as Nos.1&2 Yew Tree 10.2.76 Cottage)
House. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick except upper right where the frame is exposed with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with hipped roof, stack at off-centre and 2 gabled dormers. Four wooden casements on ground floor, those to left segmental headed, and half-glazed door in central gabled porch. Catslide outshots to left and to rear.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NG10-Feb-76TR 01597 55869
1069940THE OLD SCHOOL AND OLD SCHOOL HOUSEC18HouseII1/117 The Old School and Old School House 24.1.67 (formerly listed as Sheldwich Village Hall)
Two Houses, sometime school and village hall. Circa 1700 extended 1884. Red and blue chequered brick with red brick dressings and plain tiled roof. C18 house with C19 school hall and classrooms attached to left. House: 2 storeys and attic on high plinth with discontinuous moulded plat band and wooden moulded eaves to half-hipped roof. Three hipped dormers and stacks at end left and end right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 5 large C19 or C20 windows with glazing bars on ground floor and that at end left a French door. School buildings: 2 storeys and gabled. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor, the centre on the upper floor raised with semi-circular head. Recessed hipped wings to left with boarded door in gauged head. Dated 1884 in central gable.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NG24-Jan-67TR 01413 56076
1372047THE OLD COTTAGEC17Timber-framed houseII1/118 The Old Cottage 10.2.76 GV II
House. C17. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick infill and weather- hoarded gables. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bay lobby entry plan. Two storeys with stacks to left and rear right. Three wooden casements on first floor, 2 on ground floor and 1 each floor in shallow central 2 storey brick bay window. Half-glazed door to left in gabled porch. Single storey extension to left with 1 wooden casement.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NG10-Feb-76TR 01424 56035
1270399LORDS COTTAGESC18CottageII1/122 Nos 1-5 (consec) Lords Cottages
Row of cottages. Mid to late C18 extended and altered early C19. Red brick in flemish bond and hipped tiled roof with brick chimneystacks. 2 storeys and attics and basement to no 5: 5 windows. Brick modillion eaves cornice. Plinth, 5 hipped dormers with modern casement windows. Nos 1 and 5 have early C19 cambered heads,no. 1 sash with 16 panes, no 5 casement, nos 2, 3 and 4 have 16 pane sashes with cemented voussoirs and S shaped iron ties. No 5 has a doorcase with cornice, console brackets and 6 fielded panelled door, no 4 has a 4 fielded parelled door, no 3 has a 6 fielded panelled door, no. 2 has a modern 4 panelled door and no 1 has a 4 panelled door with narrow rectangular fanlight 3 brick chimneystacks on ridge. No 5 has 2 brick external chimneystacks and the side elevation is rendered. Rear elevation has roof with 4 half hips.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NJ23-Apr-87TR 01024 55566
1372880LITTLE LORDSC16HouseII1/64 Little Lords
House. C16, rebuilt C19. Timber framed and clad to left with red brick, and weatherboarded to right on red brick base. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys with stacks to end left and end right. Three wooden casements on first floor, 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Central boarded door. Interior: some exposed curved tension bracing of large scantling visible in largely late C18 building.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NJ10-Nov-86TR 00983 55524
1069922CHURCH OF ST LEONARDC13ChurchII*1/74 Church of St Leonard 24.1.67 GV II*
Parish church. C13 and early C19. Flint, entirely rendered and channelled except on part of nave north wall. Plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave, south porch and west tower. C19 west end, with chamfered Gothick lancets, and double chamfered west doorway to tower-cum-porch, with louvred belfry. Battlemented south porch. Chancel with offset corner buttresses, 2 east lancets and C14 ogee headed north window. North nave and chancel wall is inset 3 times with exposed quoins, the chancel roof also stepped – evidence of previous greater size of church. Interior: west tower intrudes into nave; nave roof of 2 large moulded crown posts, chancel roof of 3 spindly crown posts. No chancel arch, but chancel stepped in from nave, and north chancel wall stepped in, with exposed jambs of arcade to lost chapel. Fittings: complete set of C18 box pews with raised and fielded panels, the rear set raised in tiers. Integral 2-tier pulpit with ramped hand rail and panelling. C18 altar rail with turned balusters and square knops and moulded dado panelling to sanctuary and reredos with ball flower finial and inscriptions. C15 bench ends incorporated into C18 Choir stalls; linenfold panels, with emblem of Trinity on one end and Star and Garter on the other end. Inscribed to and made for Sir Richard Badlesmere, 1415. C15 octagonal font; plain with C17 wooden font cover. Royal coat of Arms 1717, and large hatchment on south wall. Six Tugged inscription boards in nave. The whole is remarkably unrestored and unusually so for this part of Kent.(See B.0.E. Kent II, 1983, 131).
Badlesmere CPME13 0NL24-Jan-67TR 01387 55096
1069923BADLESMERE COURTC16HouseII1/75 Badlesmere Court 24.1.67 GV II
House. Early C19. Red brick and slated roof. Two storeys and overhanging eaves to hipped roof with stacks to left and right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with gauged heads. Central door of 9 panels with semi-circular fanlight and open pediment on Doric columns. Recessed 2 storey hipped wing to left with 1 window each floor. Evidence of earlier (C16) building in cellars. (See Igglesden, vol.22,p.25).
Badlesmere CPME13 0NL24-Jan-67TR 01417 55045
1054051CHURCH OF ST LAWRENCEC13ChurchII*3/93 Church of St Lawrence 24.1.67 II*
Parish church. C13, consecrated 1222. Restored C18, and 1882 and vestry added. Flint, with red and blue brick on north nave aisle. Plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave and north aisle, north-west vestry, west tower and south porch. West end rebuilt C19 with south porch and tiled west tower belfry. Chancel with lancets to south,north and east, and 2 light C14 windows on south. North aisle with C15 fenestration, reset in C18 brick each wall. Interior: 2 bay north arcade, chamfered on moulded abaci and large square pier. Wide north aisle. Roof in nave of 3 crown posts, with timbered gable to chancel, with roof of 3 small crown posts. Fittings: piscina in chancel with shelf, hollow chamfered surround and moulded stops; drip mould over. Smaller and identical piscina in north aisle. Monument: Katherine Rooper, d.1606. Wall monument in chancel. Alabaster kneeling woman at prayer desk, behind her her son Francis Herdson, with architectural surround, ribboned side pieces on scrolled and floriated base, with coffered cornice and achievement over. Glass: in eastern lancets, 1888 by Kempe. (See B.O.E. Kent II 1983, 369; also Igglesden, 21, p.29).
Leaveland CPME13 0NP24-Jan-67TR 00488 54850
1054067LEAVELAND COURTC15Timber-framed HouseII*Parish church. C13, consecrated 1222. Restored C18, and 1882 and vestry added. Flint, with red and blue brick on north nave aisle. Plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave and north aisle, north-west vestry, west tower and south porch. West end rebuilt C19 with south porch and tiled west tower belfry. Chancel with lancets to south,north and east, and 2 light C14 windows on south. North aisle with C15 fenestration, reset in C18 brick each wall. Interior: 2 bay north arcade, chamfered on moulded abaci and large square pier. Wide north aisle. Roof in nave of 3 crown posts, with timbered gable to chancel, with roof of 3 small crown posts. Fittings: piscina in chancel with shelf, hollow chamfered surround and moulded stops; drip mould over. Smaller and identical piscina in north aisle. Monument: Katherine Rooper, d.1606. Wall monument in chancel. Alabaster kneeling woman at prayer desk, behind her her son Francis Herdson, with architectural surround, ribboned side pieces on scrolled and floriated base, with coffered cornice and achievement over. Glass: in eastern lancets, 1888 by Kempe. (See B.O.E. Kent II 1983, 369; also Igglesden, 21, p.29).Leaveland CPME13 0NP27-Aug-52TR 00389 54852
1069932MONUMENT TO WILLIAM WATERMAN, ABOUT 10 METRES SOUTH OF CHURCH OF ST LAWRENCEC19MonumentII3/94 Monument to William Waterman, about 10 metres south of Church of St Lawrence
Monument. Stone.William Waterman, died 1809, and others of his family. Rectangular panelled body on moulded plinth, with urn finial, about 4 feet high.
Leaveland CPME13 0NP10-Nov-86TR 00496 54840
1069933BARN 30 METRES WEST OF LEAVELAND COURTC18BarnII3/96 Barn 30 metres west of Leaveland Court GV II
Barn. Early C18. Timber framed and weatherboarded with plain tiled roof. Hipped roof with 2 hipped mid streys to left and to right. Interior: 5 bays with aisles. Straight quadrant braces to arcade posts, clasped purlin roof. Included for group value with Leaveland Court.
Leaveland CPME13 0NP10-Nov-86TR 00400 54788
1054075DAIRY COURT, ESTATE HOUSE AND COURTYARD, LEES COURTC18DairyII1/98 Dairy Court, Estate House and 24.1.67 courtyard, Lees Court
Dairy and estate offices, now flats. Circa 1790. By Sir John Soane. Red brick and slated roof. Estate offices: 2 storeys on plinth with box eaves to hipped roof and stack to right. Nine small glazing bar sashes with gauged heads on first floor, and 6 semi-circular headed glazing bar sashes in gauged and rebated surrounds on ground floor. Three half glazed doors with semi-circular fanlights in double rebated surrounds to left, centre and right, each with flight of 3 steps and iron hand rails. The dairy building in the courtyard to the rear much altered, square in plan with low single storeyed side wings, wooden casements. Interior panelling. Courtyard entrance via gauged elliptical arch with large pediment over. Eight feet high walls to left connecting with stables with carriage entrances; large piers with ball finials.
Sheldwich CPME13 0NQ24-Jan-67TR 01991 56106
1363416LEES COURTC17HouseI1/97 Lees Court 27.8.52 GV I
House, now flats. Completed c.1652 for Sir George Sondes, rebuilt 1912. Reconstruction by Edward Hoare and Montague Wheeler. Brick, rendered, with pilaster bases and capitals and doorcase of ashlar. Slated roof. Built, following a pre C17 plan around a courtyard. Two storeys, of 13 bays separated by giant Ionic pilasters, with moulded bases, and large swags between volutes of capitals. Entablature with enriched cornice brackets to large overhanging eaves and hipped roof with 8 stacks ranged on ridge and to rear. Regular fenestration of 13 glazing bar sashes on each floor, without surrounds or mouldings. The centre 4 on ground floor are raised slightly. Central half-glazed door with moulded stone surround, and scrolled pediment, enriched, enclosing central cartouche. Right return: constructed 1912 by Hoare as new entrance frontin Baroque style. Large Doric portico in 2 stages, with large Venetian window to left. Rear courtyard, reconstructed 1912, domestic in character. Interior: entirely rebuilt 1912, and since converted to flats. Entrance hall with internal arcaded porch, and Doric screens to rear of hall and Ionic screen (now infilled) at head of stairs. Heavy wooden staircase on Imperial plan, with pendant newels and pierced balustrades with heraldic heasts. Central hall, behind front entrance, with ceiling reproducing C17 design, but lowered, with cross-beams and large central oval, all enriched. The amount of structural reconstruction is difficult to assess, but the front facade seems to be original, certainly the bases of the pilasters have molten lead on them fron the fire of 1911 which destroyed the house. Interiors and roof certainly rebuilt. Attributed to Inigo Jones (Hasted) or John Webb (C. Hussey, 1922). The use of a giant order, the impurity of proportion and the Ionic capitals, the irregularity of planning suggest neither of these architects. Hussey compared interiors of original with Thorpe Hall, Northants; c.1653-6. The swagged capitals are alsoused internally there and externallyat Lindsey House, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, c.1640, both buildings associated with Peter Mills bricklayer and architect in the City of London. He also built the central block at Cobham Hall, with giant pilasters, and similar doorcase (See B.0.E. Kent I, 233). Sir George Sondes’s connections were with the City of London, marrying the daughter of a Lord Mayor. The peculiar form of roof appears to be a compromise for the original intention of a balustraded roof with higher pitched hip. (See Badeslade’s engraving in Harris’s History of Kent, 1719). The gardens laid out 1908 onwards by Thomas Mawson, and illustrated in “The Art and Craft of Garden Making” (See Country Life, August 12th and August 19th 1922; See also B.O.E. Kent II 1983, 370-1).
Sheldwich CPME13 0NQ27-Aug-52TR 02036 56066
1069179VALLEY FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII4/178 Valley Farmhouse
House. C16 and early C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof with timber framed rear ranges with red brick infill. Two storeys and paired modillion bracket eaves to hipped roof with stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor, with gauged heads, and central door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, with flat hood on brackets and pilasters. Rear ranges with exposed frame. Interior: rear frame visible with moulded beams and joists.
Throwley CPME13 0NR28-Aug-86TQ 99897 55062
1069180BARN 30 METRES WEST OF VALLEY FARMHOUSEC16BarnII4/179 Barn 30 metres west of Valley Farmhouse
Barn. C16. Timber framed on flint base, weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with raking mid-strey. Interior: 5 bays with aisles and carved passing shores to arcade posts. Clasped purlin roof with wind braces.
Throwley CPME13 0NR28-Aug-86TQ 99868 55111
1076969WATERDITCH COTTAGEC16HouseII3/53 Waterditch Cottage
House, sometime cottages. C16 and refronted C18. Timber framed, refronted with painted brick with weatherboarded right return. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and gablets and stacks to end left and end right. Four wooden casements on first floor and 3 segmental headed wooden casements on ground floor. Central double French doors with half- glazed door to right and blocked doorway to left, both with segmental heads. Outshot to left, and catslide outshot to rear. Interior: full frame visible, replaced by brick to front and left return. Moulded main beam, door surrounds and beam ends. Mullioned window now internal, all C16. Inglenook, with contemporary child’s leather shoe bricked into it; 2 domed bread ovens C1800.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NS10-Nov-86TR 00780 54914
1069081ORCHARD COTTAGEC18HouseII3/52 Orchard Cottage
House. Circa 1700. Red and blue chequered brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on flint plinth with discontinuous plat band and hipped roof with stack off centre right. Regular fenestration of 2 wooden casements and small central stair light on first floor and 2 segmental beaded wooden casements on ground floor with central boarded door and C20 flat hood (obscuring wall marks of original pedimented hood.) Right return rendered and possibly indicating earlier framed origin.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NU10-Nov-86TR 00820 54535
1363442MILESTONE AT TR 007 551C19MilestoneII(F 112) 1/124 Milestone at TR 007 551
Milestone. Early C19. Stone about 2 feet high with pyramidal top and with attached iron plate embossed:
FAVERSHAM 4 ASHFORD 9
A later stone than that preserved 2 miles closer to Faversham, and, unlike that, using the modern spelling of the Town’s name.
Leaveland CPME13 0NW01-Sep-89TR 00680 55066
1054702BARN 10 METRES EAST OF COLLEYS COTTAGEC17BarnII3/81 Barn 10 metres east of Colleys Cottage
Barn. C17. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill. Corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with raking mid strey. Interior: 3 bays with aisles, with passing shores to arcade posts and renewed clasped purlin roof.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NX10-Nov-86TR 01076 54016
1069925FORGE COTTAGEC16HouseII3/79 Forge Cottage
House. C16 and clad C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick, with frame exposed on right return with red brick infill. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left and projecting at end right. Three wooden casements on each floor, those on ground floor with segmental heads. Panelled door to centre left with half- hipped roof. Catslide outshot to rear.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NX10-Nov-86TR 00905 54228
1069926COLLEYS COTTAGEC16HouseII3/80 Colleys Cottage
House. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with roof hipped with catslide outshot to left, and half-hipped to right. One hipped dormer, and stacks to centre left and end left. Three wooden casements and ribbed door and sidelights in hipped porch to centre left. Interior: fully exposed frame on flint footings, with quirk and tongue moulded beam ends and inglenook fireplace. Renewed roof structure.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NX10-Nov-86TR 01071 54029
1069927COLLEYS FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIIHouse. C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with roof hipped with catslide outshot to left, and half-hipped to right. One hipped dormer, and stacks to centre left and end left. Three wooden casements and ribbed door and sidelights in hipped porch to centre left. Interior: fully exposed frame on flint footings, with quirk and tongue moulded beam ends and inglenook fireplace. Renewed roof structure.Badlesmere CPME13 0NX10-Nov-86TR 01110 53999
1344051COLLINGTON FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII3/65 Collington Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
House. C16, clad C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick to main front, weatherboarded to rear, and rear wings with exposed close-studding and plaster infill. Plain tiled roofs. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and stack to rear left. One glazing bar sash (to left) and 3 wooden casements on each floor, segmental headed on ground floor and central rib and stud door in gable porch. Left return: close studded with jetty on painted brick base. Rear: large overhanging gable to rear of return wing.
Badlesmere CPME13 0NY24-Jan-67TR 00818 53728
1054709GREEN EDGEC17HouseII3/83 Green Edge
House. Late C17, extended mid C20. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and boxed eaves to hipped roof with stack to left. Projecting 2 storey C20 wing to left, hipped with bay window and wooden casement. Main range with 3 leaded wooden casements on first floor and 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Central half-glazed door in moulded wooden surround with moulded flat hood. Interior: brick in inglenook dated 167- (last figure illegible).
Leaveland CPME13 0NZ10-Nov-86TR 00898 53983
1054717EAST VIEWC16HouseII3/85 East View
House. C16 and refaced C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bays. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to left. Projecting catslide outshot to left. Two wooden casements on each floor and 1 wooden casement to left in outshot. Boarded door with raking hood to centre. Interior: full frame visible with moulded beam ends, dragon beam and evidence of jetty in left (parlour) end bay. Clasped purlin roof with wind braces. (See Swale Borough Council report May 27th 1984).
Leaveland CPME13 0NZ10-Nov-86TR 00832 54061
1054732BARN 20 METRES SOUTH WEST OF FALCON FARMHOUSEC17BarnII3/87 Barn 20 metres south-west of Falcon Farmhouse
Barn. C17. Timber framed and weatherboarded with corrugated iron roof, hipped to right, gabled to left; hipped mid-strey, with recessed cart-house addition to end right. Interior: 3 bays, originally semi-aisled to south with returned aisle at west end, with eastern 2 bays with later north aisle. Passing shores and quadrant braces to arcade posts. Renewed clasped purlin roof.
Leaveland CPME13 0NZ10-Nov-86TR 00837 54127
1069928RED LIONC17Public HouseII3/84 Red Lion
Public House. C17-C18 extended C20. Rendered brick, with timber framed and tile hung rear wing. Plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys and attic on plinth. Two hipped dormers and stacks at end left and end right. Two metal casements on first floor and 1 wooden casement on ground floor to right, with C20 1 storey extension to left with 3 glazing bar sashes. Entry in left return. Hipped rear wing.
Leaveland CPME13 0NZ10-Nov-86TR 00864 53936
1069929FALCON FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII3/86 Falcon Farmhouse
Farmhouse. C15 and early C18. Brick front range with timber framed rear range, the whole now roughcast. Entrance front: 2 storeys and hipped roof with stacks projecting at end left and end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 wooden casements on ground floor. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels, the top 2 glazed, with flat hood. Rear wing: 1 storey and attic, with 1 gabled dormer, central stack and 1 wooden casement. Interior: rear wing contains crown post roof.
Leaveland CPME13 0NZ10-Nov-86TR 00865 54152
1049036BIER HOUSE 30 METRES SOUTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST JAMESC19Bier HouseII1/60 Bier House 30 metres south east of Church of St James
Bier house or mortuary chapel. C19 with re-used C14 features. Flint with plain tiled roof. Boarded door to north. Blocked medieval arch in west wall. South wall formed by re-used C14 traceried 2 light window from the Church of St James.
Sheldwich CPME13 0PA10-Nov-86TR 01162 56845
1049130CHURCH OF ST JAMESC12ChurchII*Bier house or mortuary chapel. C19 with re-used C14 features. Flint with plain tiled roof. Boarded door to north. Blocked medieval arch in west wall. South wall formed by re-used C14 traceried 2 light window from the Church of St James.Sheldwich CPME13 0PA24-Jan-67TR 01133 56863
1069085THREE CHEST TOMBS ABOUT 10 METRES SOUTH OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST JAMESC18TombII1/59 Three chest tombs about 10 metres south of chancel of Church of St James
Chest tombs. C18 and C19. Hilton family tomb, first date 1747, with moulded corner piers in artificial stone and designs of cherubs and death’s heads. Elizabeth Cock, d.1751, with incised oval panels and urn- shaped corner piers. Charles Brooks, d.1833, heavy incised panels with pedimented top in railed enclosure with urn principals.
Sheldwich CPME13 0PA10-Nov-86TR 01144 56845
1344050Throwley HouseC19HouseII*SHELDWICH ASHFORD ROAD (west side) Throwley House
(formerly listed in Throwley C.P.)
House. Early C19 rebuilding of C18 or C17 house. Painted brick, and mathematical tile on lathe and plaster base to return and rear walls .Slated roof.
Two storeys and basement with paired modillion eaves to hipped roof with stacks to left, centre, right and rear. Regular fenestration of five glazing bar sashes on first floor and four on ground floor, all with gauged heads. Central half-glazed door with rectangular fanlight. Porch with paired Ionic columns, attached cast wreaths to cornice, and incised Greek Keys on door surround.
Left return and rear: continuous verandah with tent roof on slender posts: Glazing bar sashes with shutters, and French windows on ground floor.
Interior: Doric columned screen with elliptical arch from doorway to stair hall. Stair late C19 insertion but with original octagonal top lit dome. All rooms with egg and tongue and modillion cornices. Drawing room with Corinthian screen and enriched soffits and Neo-classical tiled fire-place. Internal shutters to French windows slide into wall cavities. Palmette frieze .Second drawing room, urn and acanthus frieze, scrolled and enriched pediments over doors. Fireplace with Corinthan paired columns, enriched,supporting overmantel with paired Ionic columns and scrolled pediment with bracket for statue. Dining room with gilded wallpaper (the gold leaf now overpainted). Guilloched frieze and Wedgwood -style plaster plaques over the doors. Re-used C16 or C17 fireplace, possibly colonial in original, with (apparently) a native King or Queen as supporters.
Sheldwich CPME13 0PA02-Nov-78TR 01055 56839
1372876STABLE BLOCK ABOUT 10 METRES NORTH OF THROWLEY HOUSEC17StablesIIHouse. C16. Timber framed, part exposed with plaster infill, part rendered and part weatherboarded. Plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys and continuous jetty, underbuilt to left. Hipped roof with gablets, gabled dormer to right and stacks to centre right and projecting at end right. Two wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor. Entry in porch on rear front. Outshot to right.Sheldwich CPME13 0PA10-Nov-86TR 01064 56860
1069181MONUMENT TO JOHN KEMP, 1 METRE SOUTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST MICHAELC18MonumentII4/183 Monument to John Kemp, 1 metre south- east of Church of St. Michael
Monument. John Kemp, died 1792. Stone. Square pedestal with urn on coved cap. Inscriptions on panels to other members of Kemp family.
Throwley CPME13 0PF28-Aug-86TQ 99154 55640
1203514CHURCH HOUSEC16HouseII4/180 Church House (formerly 27.8.52 listed as Church Cottages)
House. C16. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick infill and plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan of 4 framed bays. Two storeys on flint plinth, and small frame panelling with continuous jetty. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre right and projecting at end left. Five mullioned windows on first floor and 3 on ground floor with plank and stud door to centre right. Return sides close-studded. Built by Sir Thomas Sondes (died 1592) as school house. (See Hasted, VI, 457.)
Throwley CPME13 0PF27-Aug-52TQ 99203 55672
1203524MONUMENT TO ROBERT CHAPMAN, 1 METRE WEST OF SOUTH PORCH OF CHURCH OF ST MICHAELC19MonumentII4/182 Monument to Robert Chapman, 1 metre west of south porch of Church of St. Michael
Monument. Robert Chapman, gent., died 1803. Stone with artificial stone panels. Pedestal on plinth with engaged and fluted columns on the corners, and an urn on the crest. Inscriptions to other later persons of various families.
Throwley CPME13 0PF28-Aug-86TQ 99136 55641
1281630MONUMENT TO JOHN HUGHES, 10 METRES SOUTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST MICHAELC18MonumentII4/184 Monument to John Hughes, 10 metres south-east of Church of St. Michael
Monument to John Hughes, died 1776. Stone on red brick base. Two tier rendered base and square monument with panelled sides and cornice to knopped head.
Throwley CPME13 0PF28-Aug-86TQ 99171 55640
1343984CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELSC12ChurchIPublic house. C18. Painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and brick cornice to hipped roof with stacks to rear left and projecting at end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor and central door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, with cornice hood on pilasters.Throwley CPME13 0PF28-Aug-86TQ 99144 55651
1069182GRANARY APPROXIMATELY 20 METRES SOUTH EAST OF PARKLANE FARMHOUSEC18GranaryIIMonument. John Kemp, died 1792. Stone. Square pedestal with urn on coved cap. Inscriptions on panels to other members of Kemp family.Throwley CPME13 0PH28-Aug-86TQ 99057 54482
1281528BARN APPROXIMATELY 40 METRES SOUTH OF PARKLANE FARMHOUSE WITH ENCLOSING FARMYARD WALLSC17BarnIIEarly C18. 2 storeys, weatherboarded with rendering to side. Tiled mansard roof, raised to rear. 2 windows, hung sashes with glazing bars, most later. Plain door to No 22; door to No 24 to side.Throwley CPME13 0PH28-Aug-86TQ 99064 54465
1069178FORGE FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII6/174 Forge Farmhouse 24.1.67 GV II
Ceiled hall house. C15. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick and plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. One storey and attic, with end jetty to left, and hipped roof with 1 hipped dormer and stacks to end left and end right. Three wooden casements and central boarded door. Catslide outshot to right. Unusual plan with parlour and solar (to left) always larger than hall, to allow for internal staircase access to solar. [See R.C.H.M. report, n.d., E.W. Parkin.)
Throwley CPME13 0PJ24-Jan-67TQ 98808 54235
1203505FORGE HOUSEC17HouseII6/175 Forge House
House. C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and pebbledashed with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and roof hipped to right, with stacks to end left and projecting to end right. Two sash windows to each floor and half-glazed door to centre right in C20 porch. Outshot to left with 1 glazing bar sash. Integral forge housing to rear in catslide outshot. Included for group value.
Throwley CPME13 0PJ28-Aug-86TQ 98836 54256
1203508OLD BARN COTTAGEC16HouseIIHouse. C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and pebbledashed with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and roof hipped to right, with stacks to end left and projecting to end right. Two sash windows to each floor and half-glazed door to centre right in C20 porch. Outshot to left with 1 glazing bar sash. Integral forge housing to rear in catslide outshot. Included for group value.Throwley CPME13 0PJ28-Aug-86TQ 98734 54274
1281656POST OFFICE AND WHITINGS HOUSEC15HouseII6/171 Post Office and Whitings 24.1.57 House
House, now 2 houses. C15. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick infill and part clad with painted brick and part weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets, and projecting hip to right, with stacks to centre and to right. Five light wooden casement to left on first floor and 3 light on ground floor, and 1 wooden casement to right. Boarded door to left and door of 4 panels to right. Outshots to left and right.
Throwley CPME13 0PJ24-Jan-67TQ 98891 54260
1281657AGRICULTURAL BUILDINGS APPROXIMATELY 10 METRES SOUTH EAST OF SOUTH FORSTAL FARMHOUSEC18Agricultural BuildingII6/173 Agricultural buildings approx. 10 metres south- east of South Forstal Farmhouse
Agricultural buildings. C18. Timber framed and weather boarded on brick base, with plain tiled roof. Hipped roof, with hipped extension to right. Central cart doors. Included for group value with South Forstal Farmhouse.
Throwley CPME13 0PJ28-Aug-86TQ 98782 54240
1343982SOUTH FORSTAL FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII6/172 South Forstal Farmhouse
House. C16 and refaced C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick on ground floor and weather boarded on first floor. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth and hipped roof with stacks to left and projecting at end right. Two wooden casements on each floor and central boarded door with catslide outshot to left.
Throwley CPME13 0PJ28-Aug-86TQ 98759 54241
1343983THE WINDMILL INNC18Public HouseII6/176 The Windmill Inn 24.1.67 GV II
Public house. C18. Painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and brick cornice to hipped roof with stacks to rear left and projecting at end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor and central door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, with cornice hood on pilasters.
Throwley CPME13 0PJ24-Jan-67TQ 98873 54247
1393349K6 TELEPHONE KIOSKC20Telephone KioskIITHROWLEY
1446/0/10012 THE GREEN 08-JUL-09 K6 telephone kiosk
K6 telephone kiosk
DESCRIPTION: The K6 is a standardised design made of cast iron, painted red overall with long horizontal glazing in door and sides and with the crowns situated on the top panels being applied not perforated. There are rectangular white display signs, reading TELEPHONE beneath the shallow curved roof. It has modernised internal equipment. The kiosk is in reasonable condition, the display signs above the doors are faded and discoloured, however it retains its glass windows.
The kiosk stands on the eastern edge of the village green, outside The Old Post Office (Grade II). The south side of the green is lined with a number of listed buildings, The Windmill Inn being the most easterly of these, standing c20m to the south of the kiosk. The kiosk has a strong visual relationship with both The Old Post Office and The Windmill Inn, and its positioning means that it is a prominent feature in a number of characterful vistas to, from and across the village green.
HISTORY: The K6 telephone kiosk is a milestone of C20 industrial design. The K6 was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott in 1935 for the General Post Office, on the occasion of King George V’s Silver Jubilee. The K6 was a development from his earlier highly successful K2 telephone kiosk design of 1924, of Neo-classical inspiration. The K6 was more streamlined aesthetically, more compact and more cost-effective to mass produce. Giles Gilbert Scott (1880-1960) was one of the most important of modern British architects; his many celebrated commissions include the Anglican cathedral of Liverpool and Battersea power station. The K2 and K6 telephone kiosks can be said to represent a very thoughtful adaptation of architectural tradition to contemporary technological requirements. Well over 70,000 K6s were eventually produced. In the 1960s many were replaced with far plainer kiosk types. But many still remain, and continue to be an iconic feature on Britain’s streetscapes.
REASON FOR DESIGNATION The K6 telephone kiosk in Throwley Forstal, situated in a conservation area, is designated at Grade II for the following principal reason: * This telephone kiosk has a strong visual relationship with two listed buildings and contributes significantly to the historic character of its setting. TQ9888454269
Throwley CPME13 0PJ08-Jul-09TQ 98884 54269
1069176The Thatched CottageC16HouseIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 03/10/2019
THROWLEY PARSONAGE STOCKS ROAD (west side) The Thatched Cottage
(Formerly listed as Mill House, Parsonage Farm)
House. C16. Timber framed and exposed with painted brick infill with thatched roof. One storey and garret with hipped roof and central stack. Three wooden casements and boarded door. Left return front (to road) clad with red brick, with outshot to rear. Large C20 extensions adjoining to rear.
Throwley CPME13 0PN28-Aug-86TQ 99779 55990
1343985PARKLANE FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseIIParish Church. C12, C13 north chapel, C14 south chapel, C15 nave arcades, restored 1866 and tower heightened. Flint and plain tiled roofs. Chancel, north and south chapels, nave and aisles, south tower and south porch. West doorway, C12, with attached shafts and 3 orders, the outer panelled with X’s on circles, the centre roll moulded with the blocks offset and alternately projecting, the inner with more X’s on circles, with 2 offset buttresses either side of doorway. South aisle with plinth, string course and parapet, 3 offset buttresses and C15 Perpendicular windows. South tower of 2 stages with square south-eastern stair turret and C16 moulded brick surround sundial. Water spouts on each corner in the 4 Evangelical symbols. Half-timbered C19 south porch, south doorway with rolled and double hollow chamfered surround, and outer surround with label and quatrefoil spandrels. North aisle under 1 roof with nave, with C15 fenestration, and C19 chimney to north west. North and south chapels with C14 cusped ‘Y’ tracery fenestration, with hollow chamfered and ogee drip moulds. Chancel east window C19 curvilinear style. Interior: 2 bay nave arcades, double hollow chamfered arches on octagonal piers. C12 single arches to north and south eastern bay, that to south recessed and double chamfered through tower wall. Barrel roof. Chamfered arch on corbels from south aisle to tower, itself with corbel table on south wall, and triple arch through to south chapel C19 chancel arch. Chancel with 2 bay double chamfered arcade to north chapel with octagonal capitals on round piers, and single double chamfered arch on round responds to south chapel. Fittings: hollow chamfered piscina and sedile in window reveal in chancel and cusped recess in north wall. C19 reredos and altar rail. Cusped piscina and four centred arched wall recess in south chapel. Choir stalls, some C19, the four on the south C15 with carved misericords. Monuments: south chapel C16 chest tomb, with shields in panelled sides, moulded plinth, lozenge-shaped flowers, fluting and frieze. Chest tomb, Sir George Sondes, Earl of Faversham, d.1677. Black marble with blank panelled sides. Inscription on the top panel (made 1728). Standing monument, Sir Thomas Sondes, died 1592. Marble tomb chest, gadrooned with achievements on side panels. Kneeling alabaster figures of knight and his Lady on opposite sides of central prayer desk, carrying inscription. Mary Sondes, died 1603. Smaller and identical to Sir Thomas Sonde’s monument, with 2 adults and 2 infant sons and daughters on either side of sarcophagus. Misplaced scrolled and enriched carved achievement on floor to east of those monuments. Wall plaque, Captain Thomas Sondes, died 1668. Black and white marble, with draped apron, swagged and draped sides with military trophies. Broken segmental pediment with male bust. Signed W.S. (B.0.E. Kent II, p.477 suggests William Stanton). North chapel C16 chest tomb, moulded plinth, panelled sides with shields (1 panel reset in south chapel south wall). Early C16 tomb recess with moulded jambs, with rope work, crenellated, with late Perpendicular motifs in spandrels, and tomb with 3 panelled recesses with 2 shields on each panel. Wall plaque, Charles Harris, d.1814, by Flaxman. White plaque on white background; dead soldier lifted from the grave by Victory, with palms and cannon in background. Statue, to George, first Lord Harris, life size soldier with sword and plans, on four foot plinth. By George Rennie, 1835. Nave, wall plaque, Stephen Bunce, d.1634. Black plaque on coved base and apron. Foliated sides. Scrolled nowy cornice and pediment with achievement. (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 476-7.)Throwley CPME13 0PQ24-Jan-67TQ 99061 54511
1069082YEW TREE COTTAGEC16CottageII1/54 Yew Tree Cottage
House. C16, refaced C18. Timber framed, with exposed C18 framing and plaster infill on red brick base. Shingled roof. Four bay hall house. Two storeys on brick plinth with stacks to end right and projecting at end left. Three metal casements on first floor, 2 wooden casements on ground floor and C20 ribbed door in weatherboarded and gabled porch. Half-hipped rear wing, painted brick and plain tiled roof; 1 storey and attic with hipped dormer. Interior: crown post roof reported.
Sheldwich CPME13 0PS10-Nov-86TR 01050 56347
1069086COLBRAHAMSOLE FARMHOUSE AND GARDEN WALLC15FarmhouseII1/63 Colbrahamsole Farmhouse and 24.1.67 garden wall
House. C15 and C18. Timber framed clad with red brick. Exposed close studding with plaster infill on right return. Plain tiled roof. Hall house with 2 wings to rear. Two storeys on plinth with parapet to hipped roof with stacks at end left, centre left and projecting and offset at end right. Four segmental headed glazing bar sashes on first floor and 3 on ground floor. Door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, to centre left, with moulded surround and fluted frieze to flat hood on brackets. Right return: continuous jetty with dragon posts on flint footings, 1 three light and 1 five light beaded ovolo mullioned windows, and small gabled attached pigeon loft. Rear left: truncated projecting and offset stack of flint, with tumbled-in brickwork and base of moulded star-shaped flues, and C19 bread oven projecting at base. Interior: crown post roof with smoke blackened timbers. The brickwork and a timber in the kitchen are dated 1749; a window dated 1729.
Sheldwich CPME13 0PS24-Jan-67TR 00986 56434
1069183WILGATE GREEN FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseIITHROWLEY WILGATE GREEN TQ 95 NE Wilgate Green 4/189 Farmhouse 27.8.52 GV II
House. C15 and C16. Timber framed and close-studded with plaster infill with plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges, the front range of 2 builds. Two storeys on plinth and roof hipped to right, stepped to left, and gabled at left. Three octagonal stacks to front left, with plastered offset breast. Three wooden casements on each floor, with transomed window and sidelights on each floor to right. Panelled door to centre right. Rear range: close- studded and continuous jetty.
Throwley CPME13 0PW27-Aug-52TQ 99948 56793
1343986BARN APPROXIMATELY 20 METRES SOUTH EAST OF WILGATE GREEN FARMHOUSEC18BarnIIROAD (west side) 6/185 Parklane 24.1.67 Farmhouse GV II House. C16 and re-faced C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys, basement and attic on plinth with plat band and hipped roof with gablets, 1 gabled dormer and stacks to rear left, centre right and projecting at end right. Four wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor with segmental heads, and half-glazed door to left with flat hood.Throwley CPME13 0PW28-Aug-86TQ 99991 56776
1393392WILGATE HOUSEC16HouseIITHROWLEY
1446/0/10014 WILGATE GREEN 27-JUL-09 Wilgate House
House, at one time divided into two cottages. C16, with ground floor brick infill of late C18 or early C19 date. Refenestrated and refurbished in late C20. The late C20 extension attached to the south east is not of special interest.
MATERIALS: Timber-framed. The first floor is clad in weatherboarding, except for the south-west end which is tile-hung. Close-studding on the north-west side is shown in a circa 1985 photograph and is likely to remain under the cladding on this and other elevations. The ground floor framing has brick infill, in English or stretcher bond on a brick plinth. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof with off central chimneystack projecting through the north-west slope.
PLAN: An end jetty house of five unequal-sized bays. Internally this appears to have comprised three cells with two bay parlour to the south-east, two bay hall and service end of one bay to the north-west. It was probably a lobby entrance house with main entrance on the south-east side, and the original staircase may have adjoined the chimneystack but this area was altered in the late C20. In the C19, or possibly earlier, the building was subdividedd into two cottages.
EXTERIOR: The timber frame is exposed on the ground floor with corner posts and bay posts visible and the south-west end has a jetty with joist ends exposed and rounded off, and supported on wooden brackets. The first floor timber frame is concealed under weatherboarding or tile-hanging but is visible internally. Windows are C20 wooden casements, including a large triple flat-roofed dormer on the south-east side and a tall window lighting the central room on the north-west side. There is a C20 plank door with glazed insert on the south-west side and a C20 door with fifteen glazed panels on the north-west side.
INTERIOR: The north-east ground floor room now comprises three bays. It has a spine beam with two inch chamfer and thick floor joists without chamfers. The floor joists in the central bay have been removed apart from a central section and the wall frame of the central bay on the south-east side has also been removed. The fireplace has a large wooden bressumer with runout stops and the tapering chimneystack with two inch brickwork is visible above. There is a brick floor. The south-western ground floor room is of two bays. The south-west jettied end has square section floor joists running at right angles to the remainder of the room, which has a two inch chamfered spine beam and unchamfered square section floor joists. The 1980s staircase in the central bay leads to the first floor, which now has a central gallery linking rooms at either end. The single bay north-east bedroom has an unchamfered spine beam and floor joists of square section. A corner post and part of a bay post are visible. The internal partition separating the central section from the south-west room surives with tie beam, upright posts and a curved windbrace. Within the two bay south-western bedroom is a chamfered tie beam with triangular stops and curved braces and the penultimate bay has a chamfered spine beam which preserves several carpenters marks and square section floor joists. The end bay has a replaced spine beam but original floor joists. The attic contains two end bedrooms with bathroom inserted on the north west side of the central part. The roof structure has collars butt purlins and original rafters, and includes five curved braces fronm the principal rafters to the purlins.
HISTORY: The house is shown on the first edition Ordnance Survey map of 1871 with an identical footprint to the present (apart from the 1980s extension). A path is shown proceeding eastwards from the farmyard of Wilgate Green Farm to the south-west side of the property suggesting that at this date the main entrance was on the south-west side and that the property could have been in the same ownership as the farm. By the 1897 map the property is shown divided into two cottages with an entrance in the same position, but the path now leading northwards to link with a footpath. The building is still shown subdivided on the 1907 map. Later in the C20 the building reverted to single occupation.
SHEERNESS WAR MEMORIAL
Throwley CPME13 0PW27-Jul-09TQ 99880 56761
1069099MOUNT HOUSEC17HouseII(West side) 2/187 Mount House (formerly listed as Mount 24.1.67 Pleasant)
House. C17, refaced early C19. Timber framed and clad with mathematical tiles. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement on plinth with parapet. Stacks projecting and offset at end left and end right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes with moulded boxes on first floor and 2 on ground floor, all with gauged heads. Door of raised and fielded panels to centre with rectangular fanlight and pediment on scrolls. Basement opening to right. Hipped rear wings.
Oare CPME13 0PZ24-Jan-67TR 00621 62882
11218681, MOUNT PLEASANTC19HouseII(East-Side) 2/185 No. 1 19.10.78 II GV
House. Early C19. Painted brick (unpainted red and blue on left return) and slate roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to rear right. One glazing bar sash on first floor, and half-glazed door with sidelights on ground floor. Included for group value.
Oare CPME13 0PZ19-Oct-78TR 00651 62890
1338204THREE MARINERS INNC17Public HouseII2/153 Three Mariners Inn 24.1.67
Public House. C17, extended early C19. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Facade in 3 sections. Left: early C19, 1 storey and basement on plinth with corbelled eaves cornice and stack at end left. One tripartite glazing bar sash and boarded door to right with flat hood on brackets. Basement opening to left. Centre: English bond brickwork; 2 storeys and attic on moulded plinth with plat band, 4 pilaster strips and corbelled eaves cornice. One gabled dormer and stack to left. Two glazing bar sashes on first floor. 2 plate glass windows and 2 half-glazed doors on ground floor. Right: 2 storeys and attic with corbelled eaves cornice to roof hipped to right with 1 gabled dormer and stacks to centre, forward of the ridge, and rear right. One glazing bar sash on the first floor, and boarded door on ground floor at head of flight of 3 steps with flat hood on brackets.
Oare CPME13 0PZ24-Jan-67TR 00656 62913
1344021MOUNT PLEASANTC17HouseII2/186 Nos. 2 and 3 Mount Pleasant 19.10.78
House, now cottage pair. C17 refaced early C19. Timber framed and clad with red and blue brick; weather-boarded to rear. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement with hipped roof. Stack to centre right forward of ridge. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 1 glazing bar shop window to left on ground floor with 2 glazing bar sashes with segmental heads. Doors of 6 raised and fielded panels to left and right and C20 outshot to right.
Oare CPME13 0PZ19-Oct-78TR 00644 62885
106909017, CHURCH ROADC17House and shopII2/163 No. 17
House and shop, C17. Timber framed, rendered and channelled, with plain tiled roof. Three bay lobby entry plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with large stack to centre right. Three metal casements on first floor, with plate glass shop windows and door under fascia hood on brackets. One wooden casement to right, and boarded door to centre right.
Oare CPME13 0QA21-May-86TR 00655 62999
10690919, CHURCH ROADC16HouseIIHouse and shop, C17. Timber framed, rendered and channelled, with plain tiled roof. Three bay lobby entry plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with large stack to centre right. Three metal casements on first floor, with plate glass shop windows and door under fascia hood on brackets. One wooden casement to right, and boarded door to centre right.Oare CPME13 0QA21-May-86TR 00649 62971
1344016HOMESIDE WITH RAILINGS TO FORECOURTC19HouseII*In the entry for the following building :-
2/165 Homeside with railings to forecourt
the Grade shall be amended to read II* (star).
2/165 Homeside with railings to forecourt
House with railings. Early C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Three storeys and parapet to hipped roof with stacks projecting at end left and at end right. Three sashes on second and first floors, 2 on ground floor, all with gauged heads. Central boarded door with semi-circular fanlight in gauged surround. Interior: room with French painted wallpaper hung in 1836. Scenes depicting the Conquest of Peru and the Telemachus legend (see Country Life, June 7, 1956). Railings to forecourt: cast iron, with fleur-de-lys and spear heads.
Oare CPME13 0QA21-May-86TR 00653 62964
1069088HEADSTONE TO EDWARD COCK, ABOUT 5 METRES NORTH WEST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER, OAREC18HeadstoneII2/159 Headstone to Edward Cock, about 5 metres north-west of Church of St. Peter, Oare
Headstone. Edward Cock, Yeoman, d.1720. About 2 feet high, with carved skull and bones in shaped and scrolled surround.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00775 63332
1069089CHURCH HOUSEC18HouseII2/161 Nos 66 and 68 (Church House)
House pair. C18 and early C19. Rendered with plain tiled roof with pierced ridge tiles. Three parallel ranges. Two storeys and garret with parapet and stacks to rear left and rear right. Three metal casements on first floor, 1 French window to left on Ground and 1 glazing bar sash to right. Central half-glazed door with pedimented hoods. Included for group value.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00748 63360
1069125PHEASANT FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII2/154 Pheasant Farmhouse 4.5.77. G V II
House. C15 and C17, refaced C19. Timber framed and rendered. Plain tiled roof. Hall house with later cross-wing. Two storeys and attic on plinth with rendered plat band and quoins. Hipped roof with gablets and gabled cross-wing to left. Hipped dormer and stacks to left and to centre. Three wooden casements on first floor, and 2 on ground floor with half-glazed door in central C20 raking porch. Left return: Regular fenestration of 3 wood casements on first floor, 2 on ground floor, quoins and central stack. Interior: crown post roof.
Oare CPME13 0QB04-May-77TR 00751 63297
1069126CHURCH OF ST PETERC13ChurchI(Oare) 2/156 Church of 24.1.67 St. Peter
Parish Church. C13, C16 and restored and spire added 1877-8 by Joseph Clarke. Flint and rubble stone with plain tiled roof and shingled spire. Chancel and nave with belfry and spire at west end, north-west vestry and south porch. West end rebuilt and dated 1877 with 2 large pinnacled buttresses, restored C13 roll moulded doorway with quatrefoil over. Relieving arch to belfry. Diagonal offset buttresses. Half-timbered south porch, C16 Perpendicular and C19 windows except single cusped light in north nave wall. Exposed quoins of nave incorporated in widened chancel walls. Lean-to vestry at north-west. Interior: no chancel arch, roof of 3 crown posts in nave, roof of 2 crown posts in chancel. C19 fittings and furniture except large Romanesque Purbeck marble font on renewed shafts. Timbered gallery at west end. (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 408-9)
Oare CPME13 0QB24-Jan-67TR 00788 63323
1069127CHEST TOMB TO COCK FAMILY ABOUT 5 METRES NORTH WEST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER, OAREC18TombII2/158 Chest tomb to Cock family about 5 metres north west of Church of St. Peter, Oare
Chesttomb. C18. Limestone with sandstone slab. Moulded plinth, and tomb with moulded raised and fielded panels, and enriched urn-shaped corner piers. Illegible inscription on top slab.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00780 63334
1121978MONUMENT 3 METRES SOUTH OF CHURCH OF ST PETER, OAREC19MonumentII2/157 Monument 3 metres south of Church of St. Peter, Oare
Monument. Mid C19. Stone obelisk with pedimented base on moulded tapering stand. Damaged hand pointing heavenward. About 8 feet high. Inscription illegible. Small railed enclosure with hooped railings and banded knops to principals.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00795 63316
1122007BARN 15 METRES SOUTH EAST OF PHEASANT FARMHOUSEC18BarnII2/155 Barn 15 metres south-east of 4.5.77. Pheasant Farmhouse
Barn. C18, dated 1734. Timber frame and weather boarded with corrugated asbestos roof. _Half-hipped roof with hipped mid-strey. Interior: 5 bays with aisles, with quadrant braces to arcade posts; queen strut roof with staggered purlins. Dated: WH on central arcade post. 17 34
Oare CPME13 0QB04-May-77TR 00762 63260
1344014HEADSTONE TO THOMAS AND MARY MOCKETT, D.1750, ABOUT 7 METRES NORTH WEST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER, OAREC18HeadstoneII2/160 Headstone to Thomas and Mary Mockett, d.1750, about 7 metres north-west of Church of St. Peter, Oare
Double headstone. Thomas and Mary Mockett, d.1750. About 4 feet high, with 2 inscriptions side by side, and double shaped head with 2 winged cherubs.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00774 63332
1344015COURT LODGE FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseIILUDDENHAM OARE CHURCH ROAD (West side) Court Lodge Farmhouse
Manor House, now 3 cottages. C16,clad C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with hipped roof and returned hip to left. Stacks to centre, centre right and projecting end left. Four wooden casements on first floor, and 4 on ground floor with segmental heads. Projecting 2 storey porch with some English bond brick- work, with plinth, plat band and shaped and pedimented gable. Boarded door in round arched doorway. Right return: jettied. Once a manorial centre, the last Court was held here in 1919.
Oare CPME13 0QB21-May-86TR 00571 63610
1123736HOWLETTS FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII1/188 Howletts Farmhouse 20.5.75 – II
Farmhouse. C17, refronted e.C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. One storey and attic with half-hipped roof, 4 gabled dormers and stacks to left, to centre, and projecting and offset to end right. Four wooden casements. Central hipped porch with boarded door in round arched doorway. Interior: inglenook fireplaces and exposed beams.
Luddenham CPME13 0QR20-May-75TQ 99467 64376
1031367SYDNALE COTTAGESC17CottageIIOSPRINGE SYNDALE (east side) Syndale Cottages
Cottage row. C17 and C19. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and rendered upper storey, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic, roof hipped to right, with stack to centre right. Five wooden casements on first floor, and 3 on ground floor and boarded half-door to left, and half-glazed door to centre. Projecting gable to left with pulley over loft doors. Brick carthouse added at end left with dogtooth cornice to parapet, and cart doors.
Ospringe CPME13 0RJ22-May-85TQ 98952 60846
1069229SYNDALE FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseIISyndale 1/99 Farmhouse 27.8.52 GV II
House. C18 front to older building. Timber framed and under- built with painted brick, rendered above, with plain tiled roof. Lobby entry plan. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to end left, left and large stack to centre right. Five glazing bar sashes on first floor, 4 on ground floor and door of 6 raised and fielded panels to centre right with flat hood on brackets. Projecting canted bay window to right return.
Ospringe CPME13 0RJ27-Aug-52TQ 98918 60906
1031798LIME KILN 30 METRES NORTH OF PUTT COTTAGEC19Lime KilnII4/87 Lime kiln 30 metres north of Putt Cottage
Lime kiln.Mid C19. Red brick. Brick lined trench with flight of brick steps descending 12 feet in depth, 30 feet in length to arched entry to kiln. Chamfered extraction hole at rear of kiln.
NortonME13 0RP28-Aug-86TQ 97724 59986
1343968PUTT COTTAGEC17HouseII4/86 Putt Cottage
House. C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick and rendered with thatched roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to right and projecting 1 storeyed hipped wing to right. Two wooden casements on each floor and 1 glazing bar sash in projecting wing. Boarded door and wooden casement at end left in outshot, and central boarded door.
NortonME13 0RP28-Aug-86TQ 97698 59962
1069225THE OAKS, AND GARDEN WALL TO EAST AND SOUTH OF HOUSEC18HouseII4/88 The Oaks, and garden wall to east and south 24.1.6 of house) II
House. Late C18 and early C19. For John Toker. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Three parallel ranges. Two storeys on plinth with cornice to parapet and stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 4 on ground floor, all with gauged heads. Central double half-glazed doors with Gothic traceried fanlight, and open pediment on engaged Doric columns. Garden wall curves along road to east and south of house, approximately 8 feet in height, of red brick, approx. 50 yards in length. Described as built “not many years since” by Hasted (1798). (See Hasted II 502.)
Ospringe CPME13 0RR24-Jan-67TQ 99370 59866
1069226SCOTT’S FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII4/92 Scott’s Farmhouse
Farmhouse. C16 and C19. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill and underbuilt with red brick, extended with yellow stock brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys, on plinth to left, with projecting returned hip to left, and taller, gabled C19 wing to right. Stacks to left and centre left, and gabled semi-dormer to right. Two wooden casements on first floor, one on ground floor with boarded door to right, and boarded door and wooden casement in outshot to left.
Ospringe CPME13 0RW28-Aug-86TQ 98231 59340
1343969THE MANOR HOUSEC16HouseII4/90 The Manor House
House. C16 to early C19. Timber framed and clad with red brick and rendered, with plain tiled and slated roof. Two storeys and hipped roof, with 2 hipped dormers to left and stacks to left and to centre. Roof stepped up to right over C19 extension with 2 glazing bar sashes to each floor, the earlier structure to left with 5 wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor, with boarded half-door in outshot to left. Rear wing with plinth and plat band, half-hipped roof. Interior: clasped purlin roof to rear wing, visible frame in main range, roof renewed. Former manor house (see Hasted, VI, p.514).
Ospringe CPME13 0RZ28-Aug-86TQ 97813 58333
1376903HANSLETTS HOUSEC16FarmhouseIIIn the entry for:
4/91 Hanslett’s Farmhouse
The entry shall be amended to read:
4/91 Hansletts House
4/91 Hanslett’s Farmhouse
House. C16. Timber framed and underbuilt with red brick, the upper storey tile hung, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablet to left. Stacks to rear centre, end left and projecting to end right. Four wooden casements on first floor and 1 on ground floor, with mullioned windows either side of half-glazed door to centre left in moulded surround.
Ospringe CPME13 0SD28-Aug-86TQ 98101 59377
1391820WATER SOFTENING PLANTC20Water Softening PlantIINEWNHAM
28 FAVERSHAM ROAD 1446/0/10009 Water Softening Plant 28-NOV-06
Water softening plant, of a type known as a sludge blanket clarifier, built in the 1930s, constructed of reinforced concrete. It consists of two conical tanks placed either side of an ellipse shaped central tower. Immediately to the north east is a rectangular annexe/workshop.
EXTERIOR: Each conical tank is 12.5m in diameter at the top and nearly 9m high, while the central block stands at just over 13.5m. The tanks, hopper-bottom sedimentation tanks, taper towards the bottom and are supported half way up by a collar resting on concrete uprights. On the roofs of the tanks are small circular turrets. These have three windows and a door which faces a door in the side of the central tower giving access to the roof. A large semi-circular hole has recently been knocked in the roof of the south tank, and another small opening has been cut in the side of the north tank. The central tower has metal windows to front and rear, and larger ones to the sides. The windows set in the curved ends of the structure are arranged in threes. Those at the very top and bottom are in their original openings whilst the central three were added in 2006. The bottom windows look like eight light sashes, but the top half of the window pulls open inwards: all windows open in the same way. All windows in the central tower were replaced with custom-built copies in 2006. The entrance to the workshop is through a door in the side facing the tank. There are three large windows to the front of the workshop, and similar windows in both sides.
INTERIOR: The interior of the central tower has a central area open to a ceiling three levels above and a circular tower at either end with wide flat arched openings. The central section of these towers probably contained cylindrical water tanks. Access to the ground floor is through wide, square, open arches on both sides that look out onto the bottom of the sedimentation tanks. The central area is lit by large multi paned metal framed windows in the sides at second floor level. Access to the upper floors is by a cast iron stair with handrail, set against the inside south wall, which also gives new access to an unlit middle floor within the eastern circular tower. At this point the stair takes a right angled turn and continues to the second floor. Although all machinery has been removed, various features and cast iron fittings set into the concrete indicate where it would have been located. At the top is a spacious room occupying the whole of the upper floor, well lit by large metal framed windows. Access to the roofs of both tanks is from the level below. Trenches in the roof of the sedimentation tanks continue under the floor of the interior at this level. These originally held pipes, some of which are still present. The trenches are still in part under the original cast-iron covers.
HISTORY: The water softening plant forms part of a water treatment site constructed for Mid Kent Water in the 1930s. The site includes a pumphouse dating to 1937 and a pair of semi-detached houses, both still in use and occupied and not included in the listing. The water softening plant seems to have been experimental, and was abandoned during the Second World War, only a decade after its construction, and although it reopened in 1946, it soon closed again, due in part to high operational costs. The building was sold in 2002, and discussions took place about its conversion to domestic use.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: This is a very unusual structure, certainly unique in Kent, and probably in England as a whole as no similar structures have been identified. Because its working life was short, and it was abandoned and unused for over half a century, it remains substantially intact. It is of historic interest as a record of an experiment in water processing, but also has special architectural and aesthetic interest as a piece of outstanding industrial design with powerful sculptural qualities.
SOURCES: The Twentieth Century Society Website: www://c20society.org.uk : Casework reports. Former water-softening plant, Newnham, Kent
Monuments Protection Programme. Water and sewage industry: Site Assessment: Newnham Pumping Station. id465.
NortonME13 0SE28-Nov-06TQ 97417 59641
1343967LITTLE RUSHETTC15Hall HouseII1/80 Little Rushett
Hall house, now house. C15 and clad early C19. Timber framed and clad with red brick with plain tiled roof. Four framed bays. Two storeys and hipped roof with 1 gabled dormer, and stacks to left, centre left and right. First floor fenest- ration of 1 glazing bar sash to left, glazed roundel, double wooden casement and glazing bar sash to right, and 3 glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Gabled porch to centre left with door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed. Interior: roof of 3 crown posts, the central octagonal with moulded base and caps, the other 2 unmoulded, braced to tie beam and collar purlin. Smoke blackened timbers. Canted tie-beams with doubled braces. Moulded four centred arched doorway, possibly replaced from screens passage (centre left bay).
NortonME13 0SG24-Jan-67TQ 97028 60023
1343966WHINBOURNE COTTAGEC15CottageIINORTON AND BUCKLAND PROVENDER LANE (east side) Whinbourne Cottage (formerly listed as Cottage adjoining Well House)
House. C15. Timber framed and exposed with plaster infill and thatched roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to centre left. Two wooden casements on first floor, 1 on ground floor, with boarded door to centre left. Brick outshot to right.
NortonME13 0SJ24-Jan-67TQ 97092 60479
1038300PROVENDER FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII1/76 Provender Farmhouse (formerly 24.1.67 listed as Well House, Provender Farm)
House. C16, clad 1750. Timber framed and clad with chequered red and blue brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement with plinth and wooden eaves cornice to hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre left and projecting at end right, and 2 hipped dormers. Four wooden casements and 2 blank window spaces on first floor, and 5 wooden casements on ground floor, with central door of 2 panels and flat cornice hood. Two basement openings to left. Dated 1750 on brick to right of end right ground floor window. Interior: moulded ceiling joists and exposed chamfered jowled posts with flat tie beams.
NortonME13 0ST24-Jan-67TQ 97342 60711
1069221GARDEN WALLS OF PROVENDERC18WallIINORTON AND BUCKLAND PROVENDER LANE (east side) Garden walls of Provender
Garden walls surrounding Provender. C18. Red brick. Three feet in height to the front (west) of the house, rising to 7 feet to left and to right returns, on 3 feet plinth. The right returned walls with buttressing. The wall rises to approx. 10 feet to left to incorporate a glass house in its inner face.
NortonME13 0ST24-Jan-67TQ 97361 60844
1374517PROVENDERC16HouseII*1/74 Provender
House. C16 and subsequently restored and enlarged. Timber framed and exposed close-studding with plaster infill part underbuilt with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Irregular plan, main range with large projecting wing. The main range with 2 storeys and attic, with 2 large overhanging gables left and right, and central smaller gable. Stacks to left rear centre and rear right. Irregular fenestration, with first floor oriel to left. 2 storey bay window below left gable, with 6 light ground floor window, and 2 of two lights on first floor, and 2 storey bay to right with windows of 4 lights on each floor. Central gable with 2 light window on first floor, and panelled and ribbed door in four centred arched surround on ground floor. Projecting wing at left with 2 storeys and attic. 2 projecting gables, 2 coved oriels, and jetty to right. Interior: not inspected.
NortonME13 0ST27-Aug-52TQ 97379 60801
1031816THE OLD RECTORYC18HouseIIEarly C19, two storeys painted brick. Parapet, two sashes with glazing bars intact on first floor. One bay on ground floor. No. 91 now has a plain doorcase with rectangular fanlight. No. 93 has a doorcase with columns, pediment, semi-circular fanlight and door of six moulded panels.NortonME13 0SU24-Jan-67TQ 97419 61261
1069220HORSE WHEEL 15 METRES WEST OF BARBARY FARMHOUSEC18Horse WheelII1/73 Horse wheel 15 metres west of Barbary Farmhouse
Horse wheel for drawing water. C18. Timber structure below tiled pentice on vertical posts at either end of horizontal beam. Horizontal drum with horse beam, with pulley mechanism at left end.
NortonME13 0SU28-Aug-86TQ 97448 61201
1069222COACHHOUSE AND STABLE, 15 METRES WEST OF THE OLD RECTORYC18Coach HouseII1/79 Coachhouse and stable, 15 metres west of The Old Rectory
Coachhouse and stable. C18. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. One storey with hay loft in half hipped roof, with hipped stair passage and loft door in recessed extension to left. Double doors left to coachhouse, right to stable, with wooden casement over. Interior: original loose box and stalls and brick drained floors. Included for group value.
NortonME13 0SU28-Aug-86TQ 97391 61265
1374513BARBARY FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII1/72 Barbary Farm- house 27.8.52 GV II
Wealden hall house, now ceiled. C15. Timber framed and rendered and underbuilt with painted brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys with underbuilt jetties to left and right, flying wall plate on arched brace and bracket. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre left and end right. Four wooden casements on first floor, 3 on ground floor, and glazed door to left with cornice hood on brackets. Interior: screens passage and service door; crown post roof.
NortonME13 0SU27-Aug-52TQ 97484 61211
1069096OAST COTTAGEC17HouseII1/178 Oast Cottage 13. 8. 75 13 August 1977 II
House, sometime oast. C17, refaced and extended early C19. Timber framed and clad with red and blue chequered brick and tile hung on first floor, and weather boarded on right return. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth and hipped roof with stack to left. Five wooden casements on first floor and 4 on ground floor, and boarded door to centre right with flat hood on brackets. Blocked doorway at end left, C19 oast roundel to rear right with cylindrical tiled roof, the cowl missing. Interior: exposed beams and inglenook fireplaces.
Luddenham CPME13 0TE13-Aug-75TQ 99378 62566
1121886THE OLD RECTORYC16HouseII1/177 The Old Rectory 24.1.67 II
House in moated site. C16. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill, and clad with painted brick and tile hung on return and rear elevations. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and continuous jetty on brackets supported by brick piers at left and right. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre left and rear left. Irregular fenestration of wooden casements. Boarded door to right in moulded surround and plank and stud door in outshotnto right with strap hinges and enriched four centred arched door- way. Rear wings with hipped roofs and gablets and possibly earlier.
Luddenham CPME13 0TE24-Jan-67TQ 99282 62480
1069094CHURCH OF ST MARYC12ChurchI1/170 Church of St. Mary 24.1.67
Redundant parish church. C12, C13 chancel, west tower rebuilt 1807, William Moss, restored 1881-1884, south porch 1889. Rendered flint and rubble with some re-used Roman brick, red brick tower and plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave, south-west tower and south porch. Lower stage of tower C12, with Roman tiled quoins. Battlemented upper stage. C12 west doorway with zig-zag moulding. Nave with C14 cusped lancets or C19 lancets. Chancel stepped in and down from nave, with paired lancet east window and 2 lancets in north wall. Exposed quoins of C12 chancel (extended eastwards C13). Interior not inspected at time of survey.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH24-Jan-67TQ 99236 63137
1069095LUDDENHAM COURTC15HouseII1/174 Luddenham Court 27.8.52 GV II
House. C15 and refaced C18. Timber framed rendered to front elevation, with some weather board, and clad with red brick to side and rear elevations. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and parapet to hipped roof with stacks to right and projecting at end right. Irregular fenestration of 5 glazing bar sashes and wooden casements. Door of 6 panels to left with traceried rectangular fanlight. Open pediment on pilasters and consoles. Interior: exposed frame, timbers of large scantling. Crown post roof. Mullioned windows visible internally only.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH27-Aug-52TQ 99173 63092
1121907PAIR OF HEADSTONES ABOUT 20 METRES SOUTH WEST OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC18HeadstoneII1/173 Pair of Headstones about 20 metres south-west of Church of St. Mary
Headstones. Henry Ottenden, d.1745, and John Ottenden, d.1747. Identical headstones, with 3 moulded shaped heads, 2 skulls and bible in heart-shaped enriched surround. The headstone of John Ottenden (Henry’s son) is of much cruder workmanship.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH21-May-86TQ 99220 63119
1121914OUTHOUSE 3 METRES WEST OF LUDDENHAM COURTC17OuthouseII1/175 Outhouse 3 metres west of Luddenham Court GV II
Outhouse, sometime laundry and brewhouse, C17. Red brick in English bond. Plain tiled roof. One storey and hipped roof. Large projecting stacks to left, single boarded door. Interior: brick floor, large washing basins, 2 large fireplaces. Clasped purlin roof.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH21-May-86TQ 99160 63092
1338568MONUMENT 3 METRES NORTH OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC19MonumentIIBarn. C18. Timber framed (in elm), on tarred brick base and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with hipped mid-strey. Interior: 3 bays with aisles. Clasped purlin roof.Luddenham CPME13 0TH21-May-86TQ 99246 63146
1344018CHEST TOMB 20 METRES NORTH WEST OF CHURCH OF ST MARYC19TombII1/172 Chest tomb 20 metres north-west of Church of St. Mary
Chest tomb. Early C19. Moulded plinth and base, and chest with horizontally fluted side panels, and raised concave-sided lozenge and hexagonal panels. Corner piers with heavy bands, fluted or with guilloche decoration. Inscription illegible.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH21-May-86TQ 99216 63159
1344019OASTS 20 METRES EAST OF LUDDENHAM COURTC18Oast HouseII1/176 Oasts 20 metres east of Luddenham Court GV II
Oast. C18 and early C19. Red and blue chequered brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storey (C18) granary with hipped roof. Two wooden casements to each floor and boarded door to left. Early C19 rounded to right, with corbelled brick eaves cornice, and conical roof. Cowl missing. Half-doors at end right.
Luddenham CPME13 0TH21-May-86TQ 99215 63116
1069093HAWKES AND BEETLES FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII1/168 Hawkes and Beetles Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
House. C16. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Irregular plan with entry in recessed side wing. Two storeys on flint plinth with continuous jetty on dragon posts. Hipped roof with stack to rear right. Four wooden casements on first floor and 2 on ground floor with large central C20 bay window on brackets. Entry by boarded door in 4 centred arched doorway in recessed wing to right.
Luddenham CPME13 0TJ24-Jan-67TQ 98662 62876
1344017THE MOUNTED RIFLEMANC18Public HouseII1/167 The Mounted Rifleman
Public House. C18. Red and blue chequered brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with basement. Plinth and corbelled brick eaves cornice to half-hipped roof with 2 hipped dormers and central stack. Two wooden casements on each floor, those on ground floor with segmental heads, and central door of 4 panels with flat hood. Basement opening to left.
Luddenham CPME13 0TL21-May-86TQ 98142 62761
1069092ELVERTON FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII1/166 Elverton Farmhouse II
House. C16, refaced and extended C18. Timber framed and clad with channeled render. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded eaves cornice to hipped roof with flat-roofed dormer and stacks to left end and centre right. Irregular fenestration of 6 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 5 on ground floor with panelled door to left. Recessed C18 and C20 wing to right.
Luddenham CPME13 0TN21-May-86TQ 98009 62855
1069217THE OLD FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII1/62 The Old Farm- house 24.1.67 GV II
House. 1698 and incorporating earlier structure. Part timber framed and clad with chequered brick, part structural chequered red and blue brick, with plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys on plinth with plat band and box eaves to hipped roof with large stack to rear centre. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes in box surrounds on first floor and 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Central door of 5 raised and fielded panels with rectangular fanlight and hipped hood on brackets. One storey gabled extension to right. Interior: cellars, and timber frame in part surviving from earlier framed building. Two newel staircases. Dated 1698 on brick to right of doorway.
NortonME13 0TN24-Jan-67TQ 97626 62633
1343963STABLES AND GRANARY 25 METRES OF THE OLD FAMHOUSEC16StablesIIHouse. C16. Timber framed on rendered plinth and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges, the rear gabled and rendered and probably later date. One storey and attic with hipped roof, 2 hipped dormers and stacks to centre and rear centre ion rear range) . Two glazing bar sashes and central glazed door.NortonME13 0TN24-Jan-67TQ 97608 62665
1069097NASH’S FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII1/179 Nash’s Farmhouse 24.1.67 GV II
House. C17 and early C19. Timber framed exposed with plaster infill and extended and clad with yellow tile hanging. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with hipped roof, large stack to centre left and hipped dormer on right return. Four mullioned windows on first floor and 3 on ground floor with boarded door to centre left in arched surround. Two storey early C19 extension to left with 1 tripartite sash and 1 sash window, and projecting stack at end left. Catslide outshot to rear. Heavily restored.
Luddenham CPME13 0TQ24-Jan-67TQ 99805 62596
1069098CHEESMAN’S HOUSEC18HouseIICheesman’s House 1/184
13.8.75. II
House. Dated 1735. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with box eaves and hipped roof with stacks projecting at end left and right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Central boarded door with 2 light rectangular fanlight. Plaque to right of central first floor window inscribed: P. 1735 W..M
Oare CPME13 0TQ13-Aug-75TQ 99878 62860
1121862NASH COTTAGEC16HouseIINash Cottage 1/183 13.8.75. II GV
House. C16, refronted and extended C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick with tile hung side and rear elevations. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left and projecting at end left. Three wooden casements on first floor and 2 on ground floor with central glazed hipped porch. Rear wing with 3 gables. Interior: exposed frame with jowled uprights bracing and moulded ceiling beams. Inglenook fireplace.
Oare CPME13 0TQ13-Aug-75TQ 99848 62845
1121896NASH FARM COTTAGESC18CottageII1/182 Nash Farm Cottages (formerly listed 13.8.75 as Nos 1 and 2 Nash’s Cottages)
Cottage pair. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roofs. Range built in 3 stages, each 2 storeys but with roof stepping up progressively to right, and stacks to right, to centre and projecting and offset at end left. Four wooden casements on each floor, with segmental heads to central ground floor pair. Boarded doors with flat hoods to centre and to right.
Oare CPME13 0TQ13-Aug-75TQ 99849 62707
1338560BARN 15 METRES SOUTH WEST OF NASH’S FARMHOUSEC18BarnII1/180 Barn 15 metres south west of Nash’s Farmhouse
Barn. C18. Timber framed (in elm), on tarred brick base and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with hipped mid-strey. Interior: 3 bays with aisles. Clasped purlin roof.
Luddenham CPME13 0TQ21-May-86TQ 99782 62585
1344020GRANARY 10 METRES SOUTH OF NASH’S FARMHOUSEC18GranaryII1/181 Granary 10 metres south of Nash’s Farmhouse
Granary. C18. Timber framed and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Two bays by 3 on 12 staddle stones (3 x 4). Half door and wooden steps to north. Interior: clasped purlin roof.
Luddenham CPME13 0TQ21-May-86TQ 99797 62578
1338542BLACKBIRD COTTAGEC16HouseII1/169 Blackbird Cottage 24.1.67 II
House. C16. Timber framed and exposed on left and right returns, and refaced with painted brick. Thatched roof. Two storeys and nipped roof with stack to centre.Two wooden casements on each floor and central boarded door with raking hood on brackets
Luddenham CPME13 0TR24-Jan-67TQ 98902 61927
1343964OAST AND GRANARY 10 METRES EAST OF STONE FARMC19Oast HouseII1/67 Oast and Granary 10 metres east of Stone Farm
Oast and granary. Mid C19. Timber framed and weatherboarded granary with plain tiled roof yellow stock oast with plain tiled roof. Granary 2 storeys with hipped roof, 1 wooden casement to each floor and boarded door. Square plan kiln to left with pyramidal roof. Included for group value.
NortonME13 0TW28-Aug-86TQ 98158 62019
1374496STONE FARMC16FarmII1/66 Stone Farm 24.1.67 GV II
Farmhouse. C16 and C18. Timber framed range part exposed close studding with plaster infill, part rendered and tile hung. C18 range of painted bricks. Plain tiled roofs. Two ranges. C18 range now entrance front. Two storeys with dog- tooth cornice to hipped roof, with stacks to centre left and end right. Regular fenestration of 2 wooden casements on first floor, with central small stair light, and 2 wooden casements on ground floor with central door of 6 panels, the top 2 now glazed, with trellised surround, outshots to left and right. Rear range: jettied on all sides, with hip and gablet roof.
NortonME13 0TW24-Jan-67TQ 98144 62007
10694689, MARKET STREETC19BuildingIIMARKET STREET 1. 1l03 (South-West Side) – No 9 TR 0161 SE 3/248 II
Early to mid C19. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Yellow stock brick front partly painted. Moulded cornice and blocking course. Windows in reveals on 1st floor with horiontal glazing bars missing; 2nd floor front on ground floor. Shop window of 5 lights; lights with shallow elliptical heads and caps to vertical glazing bars. Shop front flanked by pilasters with capitals; frieze with bracketed end-pieces and moulded cornice over. Easternmost light canted in towards doorway,
Faversham CPME13 7AA03-Aug-72TR 01603 61322
10694582, HUGH PLACEC16BuildingIIHUGH PLACE 1. – ll03 No 2 TR 0161 SE 3/15 II GV
Cl6, but now rendered. If the lst floor once overhung, the ground floor is now underbuilt. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Doorway with flat hood over supported on brackets. A metal casement window and a window with diamond lead glazing; 2 modern casement windows.
Nos 1 to 7 (consec) form a group with east front of No 15 and west front of No 14 Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AD03-Aug-72TR 01540 61337
10694593-5, HUGH PLACEC18BuildingIIHUGH PLACE 1. – 1103 Nos 3 to 5 (consec) TR 0161 SE 3/241 II GV
Late C18 to early C19. 2 storeys. 1 window bay and 1 door each. Tiled roof. Red brick front. 2 light casement windows above with leaded glazing; segmental headed windows below. Wider windows in No 3. Segmental headed doorways; wooden boarded doors in frames. 2 doors to No 3.
Nos 1 to 7 (consec0 form a group with east front of No 15 and west front of No 14 Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AD03-Aug-72TR 01536 61330
1343842BRICK AND STONE SETTS WITHIN CURTILAGE OF NOS 1 TO 7NABrick SettsIIHUGH PLACE 1. – 1103 Brick and stone setts within curtilage of Nos 1 to 7 TR O161 SE 3/14A II
Forecourt area paired with brick and stone setts.
Faversham CPME13 7AD03-Aug-72TR 01543 61334
10675901, WEST STREETC15Former Hote;IIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 1
This is part of the Ship Hotel, Off which the main address is No 16 The Market Place. C15 timber-framed building altered in the Cl8 but retaining the overhang of its lst floor on a bressummer and brackets. 2 gables, the west one overhanging in similar fashion, Modern shop front. Above stuccoed. Sash windows on lst floor with glazing bars intact. 2 storeys and attic in west gable. 2 windows.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AE29-Jul-50TR 01533 61367
106946514, THE MARKET PLACEC18BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 14 TR 0161 SE 3/11 II GV
Cl8. 3 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 1 dormer. Red brick. Stringcourse above lst floor. Cornice and parapet above 2nd floor. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on and floor only. Early C19 shop front flanked by narrow reeded pilasters but with a plate glass window; wide modern fascia possibly with original cornice below.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group. Also Nos 14 to 16 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 and 2 4 to 12 (consec) West Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AE03-Aug-72TR 01555 61353
106946615, THE MARKET PLACEC19BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 15 TR O161 SE 3/12 II GV
Early C19. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Painted brick. Parapet. Glazing bars above 1st floor. Modern shop front. Carriage arch to the East of the shop front.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group. Also Nos 14 to 16 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 12 (consec) West Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AE03-Aug-72TR 01548 61357
10749072, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 2 TR 0161 SE 3/104 II GV
Cl8. 3 storeys. 1 window. Fronted with roughcast. Parapet. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. Modern shop front.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with the Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AE03-Aug-72TR 01525 61371
1320116THE SHIP HOTELC16Timber-framed HouseIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 16 TR 0161 SE 3/13 29.7.50. (The Ship Hotel) II GV
Cl6 front to a Cl7 timber-framed building. 3 storeys, 4 windows. Painted brick. Parapet. Stringcoures above ground and lst floors, Glazing bars intact above ground floor. Carriage arch in the centre with double doors. Heavily moulded ceiling beams inside and in 1 room a fine ornamental plaster ceiling. Photograph in NMR.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group. Also Nos 14 to 16 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 12 (consec) West Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AE29-Jul-50TR 01542 61361
111611712, THE MARKET PLACEC16BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 12 TR O16l SE 3/10 29.7.50. II GV
This building (originally part of Hatche’s House, with No 14 Market Street adjoining) was later the Queen’s Arms Inn, to which James II was brought when apprehended on the Swale on his first attempt to escape in 1688. The building is of C16 date, refronted in the early C19. 2 storeys 4 windows. Stuccoed. Stringcourse, coved cornice and parapet. The 2 centre window bays project. Small pediment over them. Good contemporary shop front flanked by scagliola Doric pilasters and the centre portion by engaged scagliola Ionic columns with modillion cornice over supported on brackets, of which the centre portion projects further than the sides. The outer sections contain depressed arches with keystones over, the western one being an entrance to Back Lane, the eastern one part of the shop front. The centre portico has a wider depressed arch with a bracket in place of the keystone. Rectangular panel of scrolled iron work below and plate glass window. Doorway in Back Lane in moulded architrave surround with blocked rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels; moulded projecting cornice over. Originally formed 1 house with No 14 Market Place [qv].
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group. Also Nos 14 to 16 (consec) form a group with Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 12 (consec) West Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AF29-Jul-50TR 01570 61342
1067608121, WEST STREETC16Timber-framed HouseII*WEST STREET 1. l103 (North Side) – No 121 121 TR 0161 SE 3/139 29.7.50. II* GV
Cl6 timber-framed house with the date l697 on it but certainly older than this, probably C16. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 large hipped dormers with casement windows. C19 shop front. Above plastered. 2 bay windows of 5 lights each containing casement windows with small square leaded panes. Flanking these are 3 upright panels of pargetting with the date 1697 in the centre panel. Wide moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Ceiling beams inside, boxed in. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 121 to 123 (consec) form a group with No 1 Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01532 61386
1069462123, WEST STREET, 1, THE MARKET PLACEC17Timber-framed BuildingII*THE MARKET PLACE 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 1 TR 0161 SE 3/2 29.7.50. II* GV
With No 125 West Street (North Side ), qv. Timber framed building, probably Cl7, refronted in the C18. 3 storeys and attic. 1 window facing east, 3 windows facing south. 1 dormer on the east front. The house is now fronted with painted mathematical tiles with timbering visible at the angles of the fronts and of the bays. The ground floor is now underbuilt with the shop front, but the 2nd floor still overhangs on both fronts on a bressumber and brackets. C18 modiliion eaves cornice. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof. The east front has one, and the south front 2, bays of 5 lights each on the lst and 2nd floors, which are contemporary with the house. They have wooden mullions and transom. Those on the 2nd floor have small modern square leaded panes; original glazing in west window on 1st floor in No 123. The south front has an additional but smaller bay at the west end of the 1st floor (in No 123 West Street), also with the small square leaded panes and green glass. This and the next bay to the east on the 1st floor have a cove below the window. Both fronts have a good Cl8 shop front, the whole width of the premises, with a curved corner at the angle, This has no glazing bars for the whole width of No 1 Market Place, which is 3 quarters of the whole, but a fine pair of glazed double doors with ornamental panes. No 123 West Street retains its glazing bars in the shop window and has a pair of simpler glazed doors. Photograph in NMR.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group. Also Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A form a group with Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01548 61377
10694632, THE MARKET PLACEC16BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 2 TR 0161 SE 3/3 II GV
C18. 3 storeys. 3 windows. Painted brick. Parapet. Windows in moulded architrave surrounds with large triple keystone over It floor, windows. Glazing bars intact above the ground floor. C19 shop fronts with modern fascias; original Regency fascia below. The rear is C16.
All the listed buildings in The Market Place form a group. Also Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A form a group with Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG03-Aug-72TR 01551 61382
10694648, THE MARKET PLACENATimber-framed BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. llO3 (East Side) – No 8 TR O161 SE 3/7 29.7.50. II GV
Small timber-framed building with plastered front. 3 storeys. 1 window. The It and 2nd floors overhang on bressumer and brackets. Gable. Bay window with a cove beneath it on the lst floor. Modern bay on the ground floor. To this building the Bank has added a large section to the south in quite good imitation Tudor style.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place from a group. Also Nos 8 and 1O form a with Nos 39, 39A and 40, Omnibus Enquiry Office and Nos 4l to 48 (consec) Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01589 61383
11161124, THE MARKET PLACEC15Timber-framed HouseIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. llO3 (West Side) – No 4 TR 0161 SE 3/4 II GV
C18 front to a C15 timber-framed house, altered since. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Painted brick. Parapet, glazing bars missing, Modern shop front and fascia. Ceiling beams visible inside.
All the listed buildings in The Market Place form a group. Also Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A form a group with Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and llA Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG03-Aug-72TR 01557 61391
11161147 AND 7A, THE MARKET PLACEC17BuildingIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. llO3 (West Side) – Nos 7 & 7A TR 0161 SE 3/6 4.5.70. II GV
One building. C17, altered and refaced Cl9. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 3 hipped dormers. Stuccoed. Heavy eaves bracket cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. The ground floor has 2 C20 plate glass shop fronts flanked by rusticated pilasters. Carriage entrance at north end. All the listed buildings in The Market Place form a group. Also Nos 1 ant 2, 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A form a group with Nos 1 to 11 (oonsec) and llA Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG04-May-70TR 01569 61409
1116164PUMPC19PumpIITHE MARKET PLACE 1. – llO3 Pump TR 0161 SE 3/246 II GV
Late Cl9. Cast iron work. Octagonal panelled pump containing spout and pump handle on moulded octagonal base; tapering shaft above with conical cap and ball at summit. Richly decorated.
All the listed buildings in The Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AG03-Aug-72TR 01576 61396
1261083THE BEAR INN PUBLIC HOUSEC16Public HouseIITHE MARKET PLACE No 3(The Bear Inn Public House)
GII Late Victorian front.Red brick with stone dressings.Hipped end of clay tiled roof to road.Two storeys.Two stone-framed cross casements on first floor and one three-light below,alongside door with tall oblong fanlight in stone surround.Interior;There are two separate timber framed buildings,the earlier one of medieval period towards the front.This rests on a deep flint-walled basement with stone dressings including part of a pointed-arched doorway.Into this a brick barrel vaulted storage area has been inserted,probably in early C18.A few beams are visible in the upper part of the house.The back building is L-shaped and probably of C16 date.The roof is inaccessible but there are jowled posts and arched braces.A large chimney stack with inglenook seems to have been inserted;the main beam of the back parleys runs into the brickwork.Some pleasant Victorian painted glass doors.
Faversham CPME13 7AG05-Apr-82TR 01554 61386
1343844THE GUILDHALLC16GuildhallII*THE MARKET PLACE 1. – llO3 The Guildhall TR O161 SE 3/1 29.7.50. II* GV
Built as a Market Hall in 1574. Converted into the Guildhall in 1605. Enlarged and rebuilt in 1814. The building consists of a market arcade on the ground floor with the Council Chamber over and a clock tower at the south west corner. The building is supported on 3 rows of octagonal colmnns, The arcade is original, but the 1st floor above dates entirely from the reconstruction of 1814. Stuccoed. Modillion cornice and parapet with pediment above the north and south fronts, each containing a round cartouche in the tympanum. Round- headed windows on the south side, square headed windows on the east and west sides, and a single Venetian window on the north side, all in moulded architrave surrounds. Panelling inside. The clock tower is in 4 sections. The ground floor is rusticated. The lst floor has long and short quoins. The south side of the 2nd floor is flanked by pilasters with a clock face between them and a dentilled cornice over, plus an inset parapet containing a balustraded panel in the centre. The top section of the tower is an octagonal cupola with leaden dome over, surmounted by a ball and weather vane. AM Photograph in NMR.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01571 61382
13438455 AND 6, THE MARKET PLACEC15Timber-framed HouseII*THE MARKET PLACE 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 5 & 6 TR O161 SE 3/5 29.7.50. II* GV
C15 possibly earlier, timber-framed houses built round an internal courtyard; east fronts plastered, facing onto Market Place. No 5, 3 storeys and 1 window. No 6, 2 storeys and 2 windows. 3 Gables. Crown post roofs with tiled cladding. Tiled roofs. Ground floor underbuilt and consisting of early Cl9 shop fronts. That in No 5 is slightly curved with reeded pilasters and cornice over, but no glazing bars. No 6 has 2 smaller windows with their glazing bars intact, glazed double door between them and cornice over. In the frontage of No 6 between its southernmost shop window and that of No 5 are a medieval pointed doorway and oak door with a keystone having the figure of a horse and the word “Invicta” on it. No 5 has a small C18 bay window on the 1st floor. Early C17 windows to No 6 which have lost their lead glazing. Georgian shop fittings in No 6. Wall paintings discovered in lst storey room to rear in No 6. 5 late C16 painted panels; written Inscriptions behind each panel on wall behind.
All the listed buildings in The Market Place form a group Also Nos 1 and 2, 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A form a group with Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01562 61398
1356691122, WEST STREETC16BuildingIICl8 front to C16 building behind facade. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Stuccoed Tiled roof. Modern shop window. Pargetting on an inside wall upstairs and the date 1706.
Nos 121 to 123 (consec) form a group with No 1 Market Place
Faversham CPME13 7AG29-Jul-50TR 01539 61381
10694671 AND 2, MARKET STREETC18BuildingIIMARKET STREET 1. ll03 (North-East Side) – Nos 1 & 2 TR 0161 SE 3/247 II
Late Cl8 to early C19, 3 storeys. 4 window bays. 1 window bay facing West in No 1 and 1 facing South, with a curve on corner in between. Stuccoed front with capped parapet. Windows 3 panes wide in reveals. Cl9 shop front; shop front in No 1 curves inwards at corner with 2 cast iron columns in entranoe.
Faversham CPME13 7AH03-Aug-72TR 01595 61350
1240319ROYAL CINEMAC20Former CinemaIIMARKET PLACE TR 0161 SE 3/311 Royal Cinema II G.V.
Bingo hall, formerly Odeon cinema. Built in 1936. Architect A Mather in a Tudor style specifically to blend in with traditional buildings in the historic centre of Faversham. Front elevation of stone with handmade tiled roof, the rest of stock brick with hipped corrugated asbestos roof. Front elevation built of local stone ashlar with projecting turret-like ends with crenellated parapet and recessed centre with 7 light 3 tier bay window with oak frame and leaded lights with coloured glass. This is flanked by plaster-work panels with masks and strapwork. Lead guttering above with foliated motifs. Ground floor has projecting canopy supported by grotesque plastered female brackets (a reference to the genuine late C16 ones in the house next door.) The fascia has diamond shaped projections and this theme is echoed by the divisions of the illuminated panel beneath the canopy. Entrance has carved panel above with Tudor roses, foliage and sea monsters. Three double wooded doors with decorative iron handles. Tiled roof has central lead fliche surmounted by an iron weather vane with motifs showing a camera-man shooting a film. The square foyer has a Tudor style plank door, cornice with Tudor roses and walls plastered with a raised chevron pattern. There are 2 square shaped Tudor style light fittings with corner pendants and St Andrew’s Cross design. The auditorium has a 4 centred proscenium arch and a curved roof containing original lantern-shaped light fittings. The lower part of the walls are timber-framed, to continue the Tudor theme with raised plaster animals and flowers. Original octagonal-shaped clock above exit with helmet visor above, foliage designs to side and motto below.
Faversham CPME13 7AH22-Mar-88TR 01622 61362
1320119THE SWAN INNNAPublic HouseIIMARKET PLACE 1. ll03 (North-East Side) – Nos 5, 5A & 6 (The Swan Inn) TR 0161 SE 3/38 II
Formerly shown as Nos 5 and 5A The Swan Inn. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows in all. 4 dormers, Painted brick. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Modern shop fronts. Glazing bars intact on the lst floor of Nos 5A and 5.
Faversham CPME13 7AH03-Aug-72TR 01616 61336
1343846TUDOR HOUSEC16Timber-framed HouseIITHE MARKEY PLACE 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 10 [Tudor House] TR 0161 SE 3/8 29.7.50. II GV
The date 1570 has been painted on the front. Timber-framed building with plastered front which has been painted grey and white in imitation of timbering. 4 storeys. 2 large and 4 small windows. Each floor is jettied on a bressumer and brackets. 2 gables with carved bargeboards and pendants. Beneath the gables contemporary bay windows on the 1st and 2nd floors, those on the 2nd floor supported on carved brackets. All have small square leaded panes and old green glass, though a good many of the panes have been broken, and have been replaced. On each side of the bays on both flanks are 2 small windows of 2 lights each in flush moulded architrave surround with diamond leaded panes and old green glass. Modern shop front with 1 early C19 doorway with rectangular fanlight. Panelling and stone fireplace inside.
All the listed buildings in the Market Place from a group. Also Nos 8 and l0 form a group with Nos 39, 39A and 40, Omnibus Enquiry Office and Nos 41 to 48 (consec) Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7AH29-Jul-50TR 01596 61368
106945147, COURT STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIICOURT STREET 1. llO3 (East Side) – Nos 47 TR 0161 SE 3/36 29.7.50. II GV
Cl6 timber-framed house with plastered front. Ground floor now underbuilt with a modern shop front, but the 2nd floor is still jettied on bressummer and brackets. 2 gables above. Tiled roof. 2 small bay windows on the 1st floor with Glazing bars intact. 3 storeys. 2 windows. The back elevation has a gable with bay window beneath it and cove below the bay. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AJ29-Jul-50TR 01596 61396
111607148, 49 and 50 Gange Mews, Middle RowC17BuildingIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 12/03/2014
MIDDLE ROW 48, 49 and 50 Gange Mews
(Formerly listed as The Star Inn) II Cl7 with rear East-west wing. 2 storey. 3 windows. Tiled roof. Painted brick front. 3 light casement windows in reveals on the 1st floor; modern windows (2 with paired lights) and 2 doorways on the ground floor.
Faversham CPME13 7AJ03-Aug-72TR 01609 61394
134383748, COURT STREETNABuildingIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – No 48 TR 0161 SE 3/37 II GV
This is an old building but has been entirely refronted with a high modern shop front that reaches the whole height of the front elevation, so that the only old feature visible from the front is the tiled roof with 2 dormers. But the back elevation in the lane to the East shows it to be a timber-framed building with plastered front and gable overhanging on bressuRraer and brackets.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AJ03-Aug-72TR 01592 61390
106944842 AND 43, COURT STREETC17BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 42 & 43 TR 0161 SE 3/33 II GV
C18 fronts to C17 buildings. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows and 1 dormer each. Stuccoed. Stringcourse, cornices and parapets. Hipped tiled roofs. No 42 has its glazing bars intact on the 1st floor and a small shop window. No 43 has no glazing bars and a modern shop front with a very deep modern fascia. Half-hipped gables facing on to Middle Row with some original windows.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 4l to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AL03-Aug-72TR 01610 61431
10694692, MIDDLE ROWC19BuildingIIMIDDLE ROW 1. – ll03 No 2 TR 0161 SE 3/249 II
Early C19. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Upper 2 storeys red brick with flat arches; ground floor of stone rubble. Dressed stone quoins; stingcourse. Window and door on ground floor with architraves and stepped voussoirs also of dressed stone. Windows with glazing bars. Flush panelled door. Once the town prison.
Faversham CPME13 7AL03-Aug-72TR 01627 61424
106949040, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 40 TR 0161 SE 3/32 29.7.50. II GV
C18. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 dormers. Red brick. Cornice and parapet. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. Casement windows on lst floor. Doorway with fluted Doric pilasters, enriched frieze, pediment and rectangular fanlight. To the South is an extension of 2 storeys and 4 windows, set back, Photograph in NMR
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 and 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AL29-Jul-50TR 01628 61449
1069491STONE SETTS IN PAVEMENT WITHIN CURTILAGE OF NOS 39, 39A AND 40 TO WEST SIDENAStone SettsIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – Stone setts in pavement within curtilage of Nos 39, 39A and 40 to West side TR 0161 SE 3/32A II
Stone setts in pavement forming an irregular shape, about 17 x 8 feet to South of doorway in No 40; area of stone setts to North of doorway in No 40 contiguous with setts before Nos 39 and 39A.
Faversham CPME13 7AL03-Aug-72TR 01627 61465
106949241, COURT STREETC19BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – No 41 TR 0161 SE 3/225 II GV
Early Cl9, 3 storeys. 2 window bays. Hipped slate roof. Red brick front. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Windows in frames, all glazing bars intact. Modern plate glass shop front with fascia on round floor. East side facing Middle Row has C19 shop window and doorway.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AL03-Aug-72TR 01614 61440
111630639 AND 39A, COURT STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 39 & 39A TR 0161 SE 3/31 29.7.50. II GV
1 building. Cl6 timber-framed house with plastered front, the lst floor overhanging on moulded bressummer and the protruding end, of a beam at the North end. 2 gables above also jettied on bressummer and brackets. Tiled roof. 2 storeys. 2 windows. 2 bays on both floors, those on the 1st floor with cove beneath. 2 doorways in moulded architrave surrounds with doors of 6 panels, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed, the centre 2 fielded.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AL29-Jul-50TR 01635 61466
1116314OMNIBUS ENQUIRY OFFICEC19OfficeIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – Omnibus Enquiry Office TR 0161 SE 3/224 II GV
Early C19. Single storey building with entrance and 2 windows in North front; 3 window bays in West front. Slate gabled roof. Painted brick; raised band at impost level. In North front, parapet with pediment; elliptical heads to doorway and to windows [windows have been [altered]]. 3 narrow round-headed openings on West side comprising 2 modern windows and 1 door; 2 round-headed openings [1 blocked] on East side facing Middle Row. Early C19 iron work forming a quadrant in South-west corner, similar quadrant in South-east corner, partly demolished. Built on the site of the White House which was visited by Queen Elizabeth I in 1571.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AL03-Aug-72TR 01616 61446
10694824, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 4 TR O161 SE 3/18 29.7.50. II GV
Cl8. 3 storeys. 5 windows. Red brick. Painted wooden modillion eaves cornice. Painted stringcourse above lst floor. Long and short quoins and keystones to 1st floor windows. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. Moder shop front.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN29-Jul-50TR 01586 61439
10694835 AND 5A, COURT STREETC15HallIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 5 & 5A TR 0161 SE 3/19 II GV
Cl5 hall. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 hipped dormers. Stuccoed. Moulded wooden eeaves cornice. Tiled roof. Casement windows. Modern shop fronts.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN03-Aug-72TR 01589 61447
11163796, COURT STREETC17Timber-framed BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 6 TR 0161 SE 3/20 II GV
C17. Timber-framed building refronted in Cl8 but retaining overhang of the 2nd floor on a bressummer and brackets. 3 storeys. 3 windows. Wooden front painted and grooved in imitation or masonry. Parapet. 2 small bays on tile 1st floor with glazing bars intact. 3 sash windows above without. Modern shop front.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN03-Aug-72TR 01592 61455
13199662 AND 3, COURT STREETC15Timber-framed BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. l103 (West Side -) No 2 & 3 TR 0161 SE 3/17 II
C15 timber-framed building refronted in Cl8 but retaining the overhang of the 2nd floor on bressumers. Painted brick. Parapet. Tiled roofs. 2-storeys. 2 windows. Modern shop fronts. No 2 has sash windows above the ground floor (small bay on the 1st floor), No 3 casement windows.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN03-Aug-72TR 01581 61429
13438157, COURT STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 7 TR 0161 SE 3/21 II GV
C18 front to a C16 timber-framed building. 3 storeys. 1 window. Painted brick. Parapet. Tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. Bay on the 1st floor. Shop front with early C19 cornice, fascia, stall-riser and pilasters.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN03-Aug-72TR 01595 61461
13438541 AND 1A, COURT STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – Nos 1 & 1A (Formerly listed as No 1) TR 0161 SE 3/16 4.5.70. II GV
Cl8 front to C15 timber-framed building. 3 storeys. 4 windows facing cast, 2 windows facing south and rounded corner between. White brick, the cornice stuccoed. Parapet. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact above the ground floor. The east front has an agreeable C19 shop window to the south with rounded glass but no Glazing bars. Former door to the north of this has been blocked and replaced by a window again. Modern shop window to the north and modern doorway between replacing original doorway with rectangular fanlight and 6-panel moulded door. Double door in corner and C19 shop window in south front. Cl7 panelling within.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7AN04-May-70TR 01578 61419
106944944 AND 45, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 44 & 45 TR 0161 SE 3/34 II GV
2 separate buildings with similar ground floor treatment. No 44: late Cl9. 3 storeys. 3 bays with lower extension of 3 storeys, 1 bay at left hand end. Stuccoed. Moulded cornice on brackets with parapet over. Segmental headed windows on 2nd floor with pilastered architraves; keystones. lst floor windows in reveals behind panelled pilasters with foliated capitals with rectangular pediments over. Moulded band above ground floor in Nos 44 and 45. No 45: C18 altered in early C19. 3 storeys. 3 windows. Painted brick. Wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact above 1st floor. Cl9 bank front with modern alterations in both Nos 44 and 45; segmental headed openings, Original doorway in No 45 has been removed. Passageway through ground floor at North end in No 44.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AP03-Aug-72TR 01603 61415
106945046, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 46 TR 0161 SE 3/35 II GV
C18 front to an older building. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 3 dormers, 2 gabled and 1 hipped. Stuccoed. Heavy wooden eaves bracket cornice. Steeply pitched tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on 1st floor. Modern shop front. The back of the house has its lst floor jettied on a bressummer and brackets, and 2 bay windows on the ground floor.
Nos 39, 39A and 40 Omnibus Enquiry Office, Nos 41 to 48 (consec) and Nos 8 and 10 Market Place form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AP03-Aug-72TR 01598 61404
1069489FREMLINS OFFICES (INCLUDING EAST WING AND BILLIARD ROOM)C16BuildingII*In the entry for:- COURT STREET TR 0161 NE (east side) 1/30 Whitbread Fremlin’s Offices 29.7.50 (formerly listed as Messrs George Beer and Rigden’s Offices) – II*
The entry shall be amended to read:-
This building apparently has no name or number. C18 front to a C16 house, retaining the overhang of the first floor on a moulded bressummer. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 3 round-headed dormers. Ground floor ashlar, now rendered; first floor yellow mathematical tiles. Wooden modillion cornice. Brick parapet with coping. Glazing bars intact. First floor windows triple windows. 4 small bays on the ground floor with projecting cornices below over- hang of first floor. Doorway with engaged Ionic columns, enriched frieze, panelled reveals, semi-circular fanlight and projecting cornice beneath the overhang of the first floor and 6-panel moulded door, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed. Photograph in NMR. East wing has a C18 core but the exterior is early to mid C19. Red brick in Flemish bond. Slate roof with 3 brick chimney stacks. 3 storeys, 4 windows, mainly tripartite sashes. Later bay and fire escape. It is possible that this building may have been part of an earlier brewery before the later C19 brewery buildings were erected. Attached to the north is a billiard room of c.1910. Large square l-storeyed red brick build- ing. Front has 4 pilasters with stone coping and round-headed feature above. Pilasters and moulded brick cornice. Rainwater head with floral swag. 2 x 4 bays. Side elevation has brick and slate porch with cambered door. Chimney- stack to rear with scroll-work surround. Interior has arched granite fireplace with oak surround and oak panelling.
Faversham CPME13 7AT29-Jul-50TR 01663 61512
1240513WALL AND GATE PIERS TO FREMLINS BREWERY BETWEEN OFFICE AND LABORATORYC19WallIIThe following buildings shall be added to the list:-
FAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/393 Wall and Gate Piers to Fremlins Brewery between Office and Laboratory
Wall and gate piers. c.1880. Comprised brick wall in Flemish bond incorpora- ting 2 cambered pedestrian entrances and main brewery entrance with tapering granite piers. Granite plinth.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01665 61533
1240514WALL AND GATE PIER BETWEEN LABORATORY AND BREWERY HOUSEC19WallIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TQ 0161 NE 1/394 Wall and Gate Pier between Laboratory and Brewery House GV II
Wall and gate pier. c.1880. Comprises red brick wall in Flemish bond incorporating 2 granite gate piers, plinth and cambered entrance.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01682 61562
1240602MALTHOUSE, FREMLINS BREWERYC19Malt HouseIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE and TR 0161 SE 1 and 3/400 Malthouse, Fremlins Brewery GV II
Malthouse. c.1890. Brown brick with red brick dressings. Slate roof. Front inside brewery complex has gable with stepped pattern and 4 giant pilasters containing 3 round-headed arches with keystones. Cambered metal casements and cambered doorcase. Fine clock in stone insert with dripmoulding terminating in leaf carved corbels. Further extension of 3 bays obscured by brick block to Old Tun House. Side elevation is of 4 storeys and has 16 pivoting casements. Elevation to churchyard has 2 large gables each with 4 giant pilasters linked by round-headed arches and corner block with 3 pilasters and cambered casements. Left side elevation has 3 cambered planks and large louvred wooden feature to roof. Interior has Queen-post roof with 3 layers of purlins and a ridge-piece. The 3 malting floors have iron columns and wooden concertina floors. Part of the complex has a cambered concrete roof.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01754 61504
1240603OLD TUN ROOM, FREMLINS BREWERYC19Tun RoomIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE and TR 0161 SE 1 and 3/401 Old Tun Room, Fremlins Brewery GV II
Old tun room. 1876, altered c.1900 by the addition of a further storey. Red brick with slate roof. Mainly 4 storeys with cambered casement but central block has further storey with gable and 2 gables to right. Right-hand side has 5 blank round-headed arches. Rear elevation has to left-hand side 4 cambered windows, central gable with finial and the 2 upper floors have early C20 windows. Pivoting casements to right-hand side. Some yellow polychromatic decoration. The main fermenting hall has 14 circular fermenting vessels, some of them copper lined vessels from the Star Brewery in Canterbury. King-post roof.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01700 61509
1260947BREWERY HOUSE, FREMLINS BREWERYC19Office BuildingIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/395 Brewery House, Fremlins Brewery GV II
Office building. c.1880. Red brick in stretcher bond. Hipped slate roof with 2 ribbed brick chimney-stacks. 2 storeys, 5 windows. Sashes without glazing bars. Cambered sashes to ground floor. Cambered entrance with recessed door- case with rectangular fanlight above. 3 steps to street. Footscraper and plinth. Church Street elevation has 2 sashes, 1 tripartite.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01696 61572
1260948BREWHOUSE, MALTHOUSE AND HOP STORES AT FREMLINS BREWERYC19Brew HouseIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/397 Brewhouse Malthouse and Hop Stores at Fremlins Brewery GV II
Brewhouse, malthouse and hop stores. 3 sections are part dated 1898; all red brick with slate roofs. Left hand section 3 storeys red brick with slate roof. 5 windows. Mainly cambered metal casements with pivoting central section. Top storey way have been added later. Wooden lucarn on huge iron brackets on 2nd floor and similar to first floor. The central section is taller having a pediment with modillion cornice and lucarn, 4 giant round-headed arches and circular iron ties. 2 cambered entrances to ground floor. Wooden link block across roadway to Old Tun Room. The right-hand block is dated 1898 having a pediment with modillion cornice, 3 round-headed arches to front and 4 to side which was formerly open. Interior contains mash tun floor with cast iron pilasters and scientific king post roof.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01702 61533
1260982LABORATORY (FORMERLY OFFICES) TO FREMLINS BREWERYC19LaboratoryIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/396 Laboratory (formerly Offices) to Fremlins Brewery GV II
Laboratory, formerly offices. c.1880. Brick with slate roof. 2 storeys, 4 windows. Elaborate dentilled cornice. Front elevation to Abbey Street has 4 blank panels above first floor windows. Both storeys have 4 cambered sashes without glazing bars and with horns with drip moulding across entire facade. Plinth. Side elevation similar but with cambered tripartite doorcase. Interior has staircase with 3 plat balusters. Included as part of a complex of buildings at Fremlins Brewery.
Faversham CPME13 7AT09-Jul-90TR 01677 61543
106948518, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 18 TR O161 NE 1/24 4.5.70. II GV
Cl8. 2 storeys. 4 windows. Red brick and grey headers. Architraves over windows. Parapet. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with engaged Doric columns, projecting cornice over and rectangular fanlight.
Nos 16 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AX04-May-70TR 01633 61527
106948620-22, COURT STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) Nos 20 to 22 (consec) ) TR 0161 NE 1/26 29.7.5O. II GV
C16-C17 timber-framed houses refronted in Old but retaining the over- hang of the lst floor on bressummer and brackets. Close-studding revealded on 1st floor of No 20 and of Nos 21 and 22 storeys and attic. 2 windows each. Nos 19 and 20 have 2 dormers each, Nos 21 and 22 1 dormer. Steeply pitched tiled roofs. No 19 has a parapet, Nos 20, 21 and 22 an eaves cornice. No 19 has 2 small bays in the ground floor, the glazing bars intact in all the windows, and a doorway with low rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels. No 20 has 2 small bays on the 1st floor and 2 modern bays on the ground floor, all containing casement windows, and a small shop window not now used as such. Nos 21 and 22 have 2 Cl8 curved shop windows with half-glazed door between, the glazing bars intact in the shop windows and door but not on the 1st floor above. Original window openings revealed in 1st floor of Nos 21 and 22.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AX29-Jul-50TR 01646 61551
111634217, COURT STREETC19BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 17 TR 0161 NE 1/223 II GV
1869. 2 storeys. 5 windows on 1st floor. Slate roof. Dog toothed moulded eaves cornice with end pieces shaped as brackets. Painted brick. Moulded string below 1st floor sill level. On 1st floor, single light round-headed central window flanked on either side by 2 2- light round-headed windows. Stuccoed pilaster with hop plants carved in deep relief at either end on ground floor and to either side of central doorway. Round-headed doorway recessed behind stuccoed chamfered voussoir with corbel stops, date 1869 and initials N S in keystone. On either side of doorway 4 round-headed windows set in embrasures behind carved stuccoed voussoirs supported by small shafts with fancy capitals.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AX03-Aug-72TR 01623 61512
111635419, COURT STREETC19BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 19 TR 0161 NE 1/25 29.7.50. II GV
Early C19. 3 storeys. 3 windows. Red brick. Parapet. Glazing bars intact. High and wide round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight, keystone over and 6-panel double doors.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7AX29-Jul-50TR 01637 61540
11162511, HUGH PLACEC16Timber-framed BuildingIIHUGH PLACE 1. – ll03 No 1 TR 0161 SE 3/14 II GV
C16 timber-framed cottage; restored. 2 storeys. 2 windows. 1st floor overhangs on the protruding ends of the floor joists. Ground floor stuccoed. 1st floor partly fronted with weather boarding, partly timbered and cemented. Modern windows.
Nos 1 to 7 (consec) form a group with east front of No 15 and west front of No 14 Market Place
Faversham CPME13 7BA03-Aug-72TR 01541 61341
10610015, ABBEY STREETC18BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. (West Side) 1103 – No5 TR 0161 NE 1/71 29.7.50. II GV
C18 front to an earlier core; 3 storeys. 3 windows. Red brick. Wooden modillion cornice. Brick parapet. 2 bays on all floors, but those on the 1st and 2nd floors altered and spoiled by being run into 1. Glazing bars missing. Good doorway with engaged Doric columns, triglyph frieze with rosettes in the metopes, pediment, rectangular fanlight and door of 6 panels, 4 fielded. Medieval cellar.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BB29-Jul-50TR 01689 61612
10610026, ABBEY STREETC17BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. (West Side) – 1103 No 6 TR 01610NE 1/72 4.5.70. II GV
C18 front to Cl7 building. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 1 dormer. Stuccoed. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Casement windows on 1st floor. 1 sash window below with glazing bars intact and shed door to the South of it.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BB04-May-70TR 01696 61620
10610037, ABBEY STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) No 7 TH 0161 NE 1/73 4.5.70. II GV
C15 Timber-framed house refaced in Cl8 but retaining the overhang of its lst floor on a bressummer. 2 storeys and attic, 1 window. 1 dormer. Parapet. Tiled roof, glazing bars intact on the 1st floor. Small shop window below not now used as such. Asbestos panelling on lst floor.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BB04-May-70TR 01698 61622
1240601CARPENTERS SHOP, FREMLINS BREWERY COOPERS SHOP, FREMLINS BREWERY OLD CASK YARD, FREMLINS BREWERYC19Cask YardIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/398 Old Cask Yard, Coopers Shop and Carpenters Shop, Fremlins Brewery GV II
Cask yard, coopers shop and carpenters shop. c.1890. Brick in Flemish bond. 3 gables, carpenters shop covered in slate, rest in asbestos sheeting. Carpenters shop has cambered casement and the right side is weatherboarded over an open ground floor. Coopers shop has cambered openings. Old cask yard was of 5 bays with a queen post variant roof and cask bath of c.1948. Coopers shop has open fireplace. Rear elevation to Church Street has 3 gables and octagonal tapering brick chimney.
Faversham CPME13 7BB09-Jul-90TR 01723 61567
1260949AIR COMPRESSOR ROOM AND STABLING, FREMLIN BREWERYC18Air Compressor HouseIIFAVERSHAM COURT STREET TR 0161 NE 1/399 Air Compressor Room and Stabling, Fremlins Brewery GV II
Air compressor house, and stabling. Late C18 or early C19. 2 parallel ranges. 2 storeys diaper brickwork, ground floor altered in late C19. Old tiled roof. First floor has 1 fixed casement and unloading door. Pivoting casement to road elevation. Attached to rear is a range of stabling dated 1887. 2 storeys, red brick into slate roof. Church Street elevation has gable with circular window and 3 cambered windows below. Churchyard has 3 cambered casements and 2 blanks.
Faversham CPME13 7BB09-Jul-90TR 01759 61544
1344236THE PHOENIX PUBLIC HOUSEC14Public HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 98 & 99 (The Phoenix Public House) TR 0161 NE 1/94 4.5.70. II GV
C14. Timber-framed buildings refronted in the C18 but retaining the overhang of their 1st floor on a bressummer. No 99 comprises the central part of a medieval hall. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows and 2 nipped dormers each. No 98 painted brick, No 99 stuccoed. Casement windows, No 98 has 2 small bays on the ground floor and doorway in moulded architrave surround.
Nos 82 to 92 (consec). Nos 94 nad 95 and Nos 98 and 99 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BB04-May-70TR 01732 61621
1060998WALLS TO NORTH EAST AND SOUTH WEST OF THE MASONIC HALL, INCLUDING GATEWAY TO THE NORTH EASTC18WallIIABBEY PLACE 1. – 1103 Walls to North-east and South-west of the Masonic Hall, including gateway to the North-east TR 0161 NE 1/69A II
Wall to North-east: C18 and earlier. Red brick or base of stone rubble, comprising masony from the Medieval Abbey of Faversham. About 9 to 10 feet high. 4 centred gateway with voussoir of blocks of stone in North- east corner about half-way along course of wall. Northwards beyond this, wall is built almost entirely of similar stone rubble; some brick and flint. Wall to South-west about 7 feet high. C18, possibly earlier. Red brick on red brick sill with toothed brick course and brick coping; ramped upwards to hall at North end, and ramped downwards at South end, just North of entrance to churchyard. AM.
Faversham CPME13 7BD03-Aug-72TR 01830 61606
1319973THE PARISH CHURCH OF ST MARY OF CHARITYC14ChurchIFAVERSHAM THE PARISH CHURCH OF ST MARY OF CHARITY
Cruciform church of C14-C15, restored in the C19. But in 1755 the interior of the nave was pulled down and replaced by George Dance in classical style. This has Doric columns, a triglyph frieze with swags and branches in the metopes and semi-circular openings framing the medieval clerestory windows outside. The central medieval tower was likewise pulled down in 1797 and an openwork spire of brick built at the west end of the church which was encased in stone in 1855 by George Gilbert Scott who also reworked the nave and transepts [1873-1875].
659/1/98 CHURCH ROAD TR 0161 NE PARISH CHURCH OF ST MARY OF CHARITY 29/7/50 I
Faversham CPME13 7BD29-Jul-50TR 01822 61535
1344229THE MASONIC HALLC16Former SchoolII*ABBEY PLACE 1. – 1103 The Masonic Hall (formerly listed under The Shooting Meadows) TR 0161 NE 1/69 29.7.50. II*
Originally the Free Grammar School, founded in 1527, built in 1587 and moved to another site in 1879. The construction of the building is similar to the contemporary Guildhall. It is a timber-framed building originally standing on an open arcade consisting of 2 rows of 5 octagonal columns supporting heavy beams with brackets attached to them, the 1st floor overhanging on a bressummer on each side. Only a small portion of the ground floor at the North end was enclosed with a timbered wall. The remainder was originally open and used as a play-ground. Above was the School-room and the Master’s Study. Now the whole of the ground floor has been built in, but it is recessed, still leaving the columns of the arcade on each side free. The 1st floor is faced with weather-boarding. On the East side are 5 modem casement windows, now obscured with black paint. Tiled roof. At the North and South ends are gables overhanging on bressummers with cove beneath, also moulded bargeboards which have recently been renewed, but without their original pendants at apex and angles. 6-light windows on these fronts with wooden mullions and transoms. Panelling inside. Photographs in NMR.
Faversham CPME13 7BD29-Jul-50TR 01851 61636
10610048 AND 9, ABBEY STREETC18BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 8 & 9 TR 0161 NE 1/74 29.7.50. II GV
Pair of small Cl8 houses. 2 storeys and attic. 4 windows. 2 hipped dormers. Painted brick. Brick stringcourse. Wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof, glazing bars intact except in a small Cl9 shop window, not now used as such, in No 8. Pair of doorways in moulded architrave surrounds with projecting cornices over and doors of 6 moulded panels.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE29-Jul-50TR 01702 61627
106100519, ABBEY STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 19 TR 0161 NE 1/78 29.7.50. II GV
Cl5 timber-framed house refronted in the early C17 and C18 but retaining the overhang of its 1st and 2nd floors on a bressummer, and, in the case of lst floor, also carved animal brackets. 3 storeys, 2 windows, 3 dormers. Painted mathematical tiles. Eaves cornice. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof. 2 small bays on the ground and 1st floors. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in fluted architrave surround with door of 6 moulded panels, the top 2 panels out away and glazed. Early Cl7 work, comprising plastered panels painted to resemble glass, has been uncovered behind the mathematical filing at the South end on lst floor.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE29-Jul-50TR 01744 61671
106100620, ABBEY STREETC17BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. l103 (West Side) – No 20 Tn 0161 NE 1/79 4.5.70. II GV
Early Cl9, front to a Cl7 building. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Painted brick. Parapet. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in moulded architrave surround with frieze, projecting cornice and door of 6 moulded panels.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01750 61678
106100725-28, ABBEY STREETC16Timber-framed BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 25 to 28 (consec) TR 0161 NE 1/82 4.5.70. II GV
Range of C16 timber-framed cottages altered in tile Cl8 but preserving the overhang of their 1st floor on a bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window each (except No 27, which has 2 windows ) and 1 dormer each. Ground floor painted brick (No 26 rough cast on both floors). Tiled roofs to Nos 25 and 26. Slte. roofs to Nos 27 and 28. Sash windows with glazing bars intact on lst floor in Nos 25 and 27; casement window in No 28. Small bays on the ground floor containing modern casement windows.
[Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01771 61700
1061008GRANITE SETTS AND GUTTER EXTENDING ALONG THE OUTER PART OF THE PAVEMENT FROM NO 3 ABBEY STREET AS FAR NORTH AS NO 34NAGranite SettsIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Granite setts and gutter extending along the outer part of the pavement from No 3 Abbey Street as far North as No 34 TR 0161 NE 1/194 II
Granite setts and gutter lined with setts.
Faversham CPME13 7BE03-Aug-72TR 01724 61640
1061009LAMP POSTS ON PAVEMENT OUTSIDE NOS 3, 7, 14, 20, 28 AND 34C19Lamp PostsIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Lamp-posts on pavement outside Nos 3, 7, 14, 20, 28, & 34 TR 0161 NE 1/195 II
C19 lamp-posts outside Nos 3 [No 684], 7 [No 686], No 14 [No 688], No 20 [No 690], No 28 [No 692] ; No 34 [No 694], Numbers in brackets refer to numbers on lamp-posts. Cast iron. Slender column with bands of necking; moulded base with anthemion motif above. Inverted conical shaped lamp-holder with conical copping.
Faversham CPME13 7BE03-Aug-72TR 01729 61646
118612110-12, ABBEY STREETPre C19Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – NOS 10 to 12 (consec) (formerly listed as Nos l0, 11, 12 & 12A) TR 0161 NE 1/75 4.5.70. II GV
3 Timber-framed houses refaced early Cl9. 3 storeys. 4 windows in all. Red brick. Nos 10 and 12 painted. Parapet. No 10 has a dentilled cornice below this. Glazing bars intact. Doorways with projecting cornices and 6-panel doors, No 10 with fluted pilasters and segmental fanlight, No 11 in moulded architrave surround; no fanlight. No 12 with plain pilasters but no fanlight; cornice on brackets over. No 12A, which is only a shop carved out of No 12, has a modern shop front.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01710 61637
118613015, 16, 17 AND 18, ABBEY STREETC18BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. l103 (West Side) 4.5.70 Nos 15, 17 and 18 – No 16 TR 0161 NE 1/77 II GV
Now 15 and 16 comprise houses with C18 fronts to a late medieval timber- framed core. 3 storeys each with a pointed gable to No 15 and a half- hipped cable to No 16. 1 window bay each. No 15 faced with yellow brick; No 16 faced with red bricks and mathematical filing. Windows with glazing bars intact, 6 panelled doors in moulded frames. Nos 17 and 18: C18 fronts. 2 storeys, 1 window bay each. Rendered, No 18 painted over and no 17 partly covered in pebble-dash. Small bay in each house on ground floor. Glazing bars intact except in 1st floor window in No 18 which is a casement window. Doorways in moulded surrounds with projecting cornices over and 6-panel doors.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01733 61661
118614021 AND 22, ABBEY STREETC16BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 21 & 22 Tll 0161 NE 1/80 4.5.70. II GV
1 building. Cl6 timber-framed building with close-studding revealed on 1st and 2nd floors. 3 storeys. 1 window. 1st and 2nd floors overhang on bressummers. Gable with moulded bargeboards and pendant. Small bay window on ground and lst floors. Casement windows in these and the attic.
Nos l4 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01754 61683
1344230THE KING’S HEAD INNC18Public HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. l103 (West Side) – No 14 [The King’s Head Inn] TR 0161 NE 1/76 4.5.70. II GV
Cl8. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 1 hipped dormer. Painted brick. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact except in 1 ground floor modern window. Doorway with pilasters, flat hood on brackets and 6-panel door.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01723 61651
134423123 AND 24, ABBEY STREETC16Timber-framed houseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 23 & 34 TR 0161 NE 1/81 4.5.70. II GV
Timber-framed C16 Cottages with C18 additions to fronts; close-studding has been exposed on upper floor. 2 storeys, No 23 with attic and gabled dormer. 1 window each. Ground floor brick. Tiled roofs. Glazing bars intact. Doorways in moulded architrave surrounds with projecting cornices over and 6-Panel doors.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BE04-May-70TR 01760 61688
1061011WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN BEHIND ARDEN’S HOUSE ON THE NORTH SIDEnaWallIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Wall enclosing garden behind Arden’s House on the North side TR 0161 NE 1/88A II GV
Wall of stone rubble (about 5 feet 6 inches high) from the medieval Abbey of Faversham. AM.
Nos 80 and 81 and Wall enclosing garden behind No 80 forn a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BG03-Aug-72TR 01836 61733
1186199ARDEN’S HOUSEC15HouseII*ABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 80 (Arden’s House) TR 0161 NE 1/88 29.7.50. II* GV
This building was the Guest house of Faversham Abbey and adjoins the outer gatehouse, which had an arch across what is now Abbey Street. It is built in 2 sections. The back section, which is only of 2 storeys and 1 window, is of stone rubble, presumably medieval, with a slate roof. The main part faces South. This is a timber-framed building, probably C15, both higher and of wider elevation than the back section. 3 storeys. 4 windows. Faced with plaster but with close-studding exposed on 1st floor. Tiled roof. It is divided into 2 portions. The west portion is studded and overhangs on a bressummer on the 1st and 2nd floors on both its South and West fronts. The East portion is all flush. Casement windows. Small porch with hipped tiled roof in the centre, but its doorway now blocked up. To the East of porch modern wooden boarded door. On North wall of this building, where it extends beyond the back section, is a massive brick chimney breast now truncated. Photograph in NMR. The house was the scene of the famous murder of Thomas Ardene in 1550, which was depicted in the play “Arden of Faversham” of 1592, written by Lillo and sometimes attributed by local patriotism to Shakespeare. AM.
No 80 and 81 and Wall enclosing garden behind No 😯 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BG29-Jul-50TR 01828 61729
106101285 AND 86, ABBEY STREETC19BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. l103 (East Side) – Nos 85 & 86 TR o161 NE 1/201 II GV
C19. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. Tiled gabled roof. 2 flat roofed dormers. Brick faced. Windows with rubbed brick voussoirs some glazing bars missing in right hand windows. Round-headed door- ways in centre; 6 panelled doors in brick reveals; semi-circular fanlights over.
Nos 82 to 92 (consec). Nos 94 and 95 and Nos 98 and 99 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BH03-Aug-72TR 01787 61676
106101387 TO 92, ABBEY STREETC15Timber-framed HouseII*ABBEY STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – Nos 87 to 92 (consec) TR 0161 NE 1/91 29.7.50. II GV II* (Nos 89 & 90)
flare of Cl5 tmber-framed houses refronted in the Cl8 but retaining the overhang of their 1st floor on a bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys and attic. 7 windows and original window openings and 9 dormers in all. Stuccoed fronts, Nos 91 and 92 painted brick, No 89 with close studding and original window openings. Wooden eaves cornice. No 92 has a dentilled cornice and parapet. Tiled roofs. Sash windows with glazing bars intact, except on the 1st floor of Nos 89, 91 and 97 small canted bays on the ground floor, No 92 has a small curved shop windows. These and all the bays retain their glazing bars. Doorways in moulded architrave surrounds with 6-panel doors, except in No 89 (wooden boarded door) with No 92 (glazed floor with margin lights), No 91 is not in pool condition.
Nos 82 to 92 (consec), Nos 94 and 95 and Nos 98 and 99 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BH29-Jul-50TR 01773 61664
1061014LAMP POSTS ON PAVEMENT OUTSIDE NOS 80, 81, 83, 91, 95 AND SOUTH OF NO 99C19Lamp PostsIIABBEY STREET 1. l103 (East Side) – Lamp-posts on pavement outside Nos 80, 81, 83, 91, 95 and South of No 99 TR 0161 NE 1/195A II
C19 lamp-posts outside No 80 [No 695], No 81 [No 693], No 83 [No 691], No 91 [No 689], No 95 [No 687] and South of No 99 [No 685]. Numbers in brackets refer to numbers on lamp-posts. Cast iron, blender columns with bands of necking; moulded base with anthemion motif above. Inverted conical shaped lamp-holder with conical capping.
Faversham CPME13 7BH03-Aug-72TR 01756 61655
111653194 AND 95, ABBEY STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – 4.5.70. No 94 29.1.62 No 95 TH 0161 NE 1/92 II GV
C16. Timber-framed houses refronted in the C18 but retaining the overhang of their 1st floor on bressummer. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows and 1 hipped dormer to No 94 and 2 hipped dormers to No 95. No 94 painted brick. No 95 stuccoed. Parapet. Tiled roofs. Sash windows with glazing bars intact in No 95. No 94 was damaged by bombing but has since been renovated; 2 small canted bays on ground floor. Original window openings and panels of timber-framing on ground floor in No 95. No 95 also has a new 2 storey, single bay extension built on at South. lst floor of this weather-boarded and ground floor brick.
Nos 82 to 92 (consec), Nos 94 and 95 and Nos 98 and 99 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BH29-Jan-62TR 01748 61639
118621282 AND 83, ABBEY STREETC16BuildingIINo 80 and 81 and Wall enclosing garden behind No 😯 form a group.Faversham CPME13 7BH29-Jul-50TR 01798 61691
124060484, ABBEY STREETC16HouseII*This list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 02/10/2012
ABBEY STREET (east side) No 84
(Formerly listed as 82-84 (consec) Abbey Street)
House. Late C16 timberframed house of c1589 refronted in early C19. Front forms part of terrace with nos 82 and 83. 2 storeys and attics painted mathematical tiles. Tiled roof with brick chimney stack. Parapet with stone copings. Tripartite sash to 1st floor. Ground floor has restored bow window matching those to nos 82 and 83. Left side doorcase has blocked round-headed fanlight, impost blocks and panelled door. Rear elevation has exposed timber frame with close studding, the attic gable over sailing on curved brackets. 2 side windows on each floor have original triple mullioned windows. Central windows are tripartite sashes to lower floors and casement to attic storey. Very fine late C16 interior includes room with oak panelling with strapwork frieze and overmantel with pilasters and arches and cupboard with cocks head hinges. Fine well staircase with moulded handrail and chamfered newel posts with knops. Dining room has early C19 wooden fire surround with reeding and paterae and cast iron basket grate and late C16 panelling with frieze of mutules. Drawing room has oak panelling with mutule frieze and pilasters and overmantel with pilasters, terms and strapwork motifs. Stopped doorcases with panelled doors and 3 plank doors with iron hinges. Ground floor passageway has chamfered beams and decorative brackets.
Faversham CPME13 7BH29-Jul-50TR 01792 61682
1319908GUTTER SETTS AND GUTTER EXTENDING ALONG THE OUTER PART OF THE PAVEMENT FROM NO 81 AS FAR SOUTH AS NO 99 (PHOENIX PUBLIC HOUSE)NAGutter SettsIIABBEY STREET 1. ll03 (East side) – Gutter setts and gutter extending along the outer part of the pavement from No 81 as far South as No 99 (Phoenix Public House) TR 0161 NE 1/194A 11
Granite setts and gutter lined with setts extending inwards for a width of about 3 feet from the edge of the pavement.
Faversham CPME13 7BH03-Aug-72TR 01760 61661
1060997FIGHTING COCKS COTTAGESC18CottageIIABBEY PLACE – 1. 1103 Nos 2 & 3 (Fighting Cocks Cottages) TR 0161 NE 1/192 II
C18 and C19 cottages of which the ground floor of the West wall comprises part of 1 of the walls of the medieval Abbey of Faversham. Upper floor in No 2 clad in tarred weather-boarding Tiled gabled roof. 4 windows and 2 doors facing East. 2 light casement windows. No 3 later C19 building. Upper floor of No 3 of yellow brick; slate roof. 1 window bay. No 2 is an AM.
Faversham CPME13 7BJ03-Aug-72TR 01902 61704
1060995ABBEY FARMHOUSEC13FarmhouseII*The following building shall be upgraded:-
1. ABBEY FIELDS 1103 TR 0261 8/96 Abbey Farmhouse GV II*
Farmhouse Circa C13 or early C14, later alterations including a remodelling by Sir George Sondes in late C17 or early C18. Flemish bond brick, the south elevation is rendered and lined out as masonry; the timber-framing of the Medieval range survives at least in its north wall. Plain tile roof gable ended main range with catslide at rear and hipped over left-hand west range. Red brick axial and end stacks.
Plan and development: The main east range, which faces approximately south, has a cross-wing at the left west end and an outshut at the back north.
The main east range is all that remains of a larger Medieval building of C13 or early C14 date. It has a scissor-brace roof which is not smoke- blackened. Later in the Middle Ages the roof was reinforced by the insertion of a crown-post and collar-purlin. It is uncertain when the Medieval building was reduced. in size, but it ought to have been as late as the late C17 or early C18 when Sir George Sondes remodelled it. He built the outshut behind (north) and the cross-wing at the left west end which has a parlour at the back and a small room at the front, but the entrance hall and staircase were installed in the left end of the earlier range which on the ground floor became a large kitchen with a gable-end stack, probably also added in the late C17 or early C18.
The original Medieval building was probably associated with the Abbey, the site of which is very close, but its original function is uncertain and not necessarily domestic.
Exterior: 2 storeys and attic. Asymmetrical south front. The old range has C18 and C19 2 and 3-light casements, 2 on the first floor have moulded lintels that to the right is an C18 3-light window with leaded panes and on the ground floor below a 3-light casement with glazing bars. To the left the doorway with a moulded flat canopy, early C18 doorcase and C20 panelled door. The late C17 or early C18 cross-wing projects to the left with an C18 12-pane sash on each floor and a band at first floor level; the right hand return of the wing has a narrow C18 8-pane sash on each floor.
The cross-wing has a hipped roof with a moulded eaves cornice, its symmetrical 4-bay left hand west elevation, the garden front has a brick band at first floor level and C18 12-pane sashes with moulded eaves in segmental-headed openings, the ground and first floor windows to the right of centre are blind and the ground floor window to the left of centre is an C18 garden door, the lower sash a door panelled below the rail.
The rear (north) side has a hipped dormer in the cross-wing and to the left the main roof is carried down as a catslide over the outshut. The east gable end has 2 doorways on the ground floor and a 12-pane sash on the first floor.
Interior: is largely the result of the late C17 or early C18 remodelling The ground floor of the cross-wing has fielded 6-panel doors; the parlour has a panelled dado and panelled cupboard doors but the ceiling and chimney piece have been replaced. A closet off the parlour has a cupboard with shaped shelves. There is a good dog-leg staircase with a moulded string, heavy chamfered hand-rail, turned balusters and turned newels with ball finials. The staircase appears to be late C17 rather than C18. On the first floor there are late C17 or early C18 3-panel doors and a C17 moulded plank door. The kitchen has plastered-over ceiling beams and a large fireplace with a chamfered timber lintel and a large oven with a C19 iron door. The timber framing of the rear wall can be seen from the roof-space of the outshut.
Roof: The main range has a Medieval scissor-braced roof below which a crown post and collar-purlin have been inserted to prevent racking. There is no smoke-blackening of the timbers. The rectangular crown-post has curved braces to the tie-beam and one curved brace to the collar-purlin. The Medieval roof was hipped and the purlin has a curved bracket to the hip rafter, but the roof has been extended to a gable end with common rafters and without a ridgepiece. The roof over the cross-wing has large common rafters which were probably reused from a Medieval roof.
Note: Abbey Farm probably belonged to the Benedictine Abbey of Faversham founded in 1147. After the Dissolution, the Abbey belonged to the Diggs family and later the Sondes who held Abbey Farm until recently when it was sold to Wadham College Oxford. Jacob’s History of Faversham, 1774 states that Abbey Farmhouse was built by Sir George Sondes.
Source: Traditional Kent Buildings (1988), No. 6, p.p. 16 to 27.
ABBEY FIELDS 1. – 1103 Abbey Farmhouse TR 0261 8/96 II
L-shaped building, of which the front dates from the C18 and the east wing is probably older but refronted. 2 storeys. 3 windows facing west, 3 windows, facing south. Front red brick, east wing cemented. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. The front has sash windows, those on the ground floor with cambered head linings and all with glazing bars intact. The east wing has casement windows, 1 with small square leaded panes. Photograph in NMR.
Faversham CPME13 7BL03-Aug-72TR 02095 61831
1060996FAVERSHAM ABBEY MINOR BARNC14BarnIFAVERSHAM ABBEY FIELDS TR 0261 8/191 Minor barn on south side of yard to south south east of Abbey Farmhouse
the entry shall be amended to read:
Monastic barn. Circa 1350. Originally part of the royal abbey at Faversham. Now of 5 bays, a map of 1774 shows that it originally continued to the end of the yard but was cut off at the west end subsequently. Aisled timber barn, clad in weatherboarding on flint and brick plinth with tiled roof,hipped to east and gabled to west. At time of survey part of the tiles at the west end had been stripped by vandals. Central C18 hipped cart entrance. All passing braces are present and aisle posts have arch braces and rest on shored plinths. An unusual feature is that 3 posts are not squared at their bases but present untrimmed trunks, with untrimmed forks supporting the posts on two legs. West end has terminal outshot and shored axial post. Rafters suggest that east end also once had a cantilevered half bay and outshot. Roof has 5 chamfered crownposts, 3 having 4 headbraces and 2 having 2. Complete set of original rafters. Thought to be one of only two surviving collar purlin and crownpost roof barns of the middle period in Kent by S E Rigold. [ See “Some Major Kentish Timber Barns” S E Rigold in Arch. Cant. LXXXI (1966).]
ABBEY FIELDS 1. 1103 TR 0261 8/191 Minor barn on south side of yard to south south east of Abbey Farmhouse GV II*
Barn. Probably early to mid-C15 with minor later alterations. Weatherboarded timber frame on stone rubble plinth. Large plain tile roof, the right hand (north) end hipped, the left hand end is now gabled.
Plan: 5-bay aisled barn originally with aisles at both ends but the left east end aisle has been removed. The narrow centre bay has a cart entrance at the front.
Exterior: Large plain tile hipped roof is carried down over the aisles to low walls, clad in weatherboarding except at the left (east) end which is gabled. The north front has a cart entrance to the left of centre with boarded double doors and a circa C17 hipped canopy on curved braces.
Interior: Fine crown-post roof of large scantling has tall chamfered and stopped crown-posts with curved braces; the crown-posts on either side of the centre bay and at the ends have braces at the top on all four sides to the purlin and collar but the crown-posts between have only longitudinal braces. Arch braces from the arcade posts to the tie-beams and arcade plates. Curved passing shores halved and lapped to the aisle ties. The arcade posts have jowled heads and the post between bays 1 and 2 at the front (north east) has a massive forked branch downward curving into the aisle. The common rafters appear to be complete and there is no ridgepiece, but the gable over the cart entrance has a later common rafter roof with a ridge board.
Note: Abbey Farm probably belonged to the Benedictine Abbey of Faversham founded in 1147.
Source: Traditional Kent Buildings (1988), No. 6, p. p. 16-27.
Barn along South side of Yard to South east of Abbey Farmhouse TR 0261 8/191 II
Late C15. Aisled barn. 5 bays and 1 end bay. In a complete state. Crown post roof. Externally, very low, very steeply pitched modern tiled roof; low walls with weather-boarded cladding. AM.
Faversham CPME13 7BL03-Aug-72TR 02127 61732
1261088CARTSHED AND ADJOINING SHED ABOUT 80 METRES SOUTH EAST OF ABBEY FARMHOUSEC18Cart ShedIIThe following building shall be added to the list:
ABBEY FIELDS 1. 1103 TR 0261 8/327 Cartshed and adjoining shed about 80 metres southeast of Abbey Farmhouse. GV II
Cartshed and integral shed of uncertain function. Probably C18. Weatherboarded timber frame. Hipped corrugated iron roof.
Plan: 6-bay rectangular building. The 3 wider cart-shed bays at the west end are open on the north front and west end. The 3 narrower eastern bays are closed in and there is a doorway on the north side of the third bay from the east.
Exterior: The north front has 3 open bays to the right with curved braces and is weatherboarded to the left with a doorway to the left of centre. The west end is open and the east end and rear (south) are weatherboarded and without openings. Interior: The close-studded timber frame is complete and has curved braces to the open bays, tension braces to the closed bays and jowled wall-posts, but only a few of the curved braces to the tie-beams remain. Complete common-rafter roof with straight morticed collars, clasped purlins and a board at the ridge. The joints have carpenter’s assembly marks. The closed east end is said to have been a carpentry shop but its original use is not known. In spite of the missing roof cladding the structure is complete and it is an interesting example of anCl8 farm building.
Source: Traditional Kent Buildings (1988) No. 6 pp 16-27
Faversham CPME13 7BL17-Jan-89TR 02161 61770
1344267FAVERSHAM ABBEY MAJOR BARNC16BarnII*659/5/10003 Faversham Abbey Major barn
Monastic aisled barn. Circa 1500 with some early C19 alterations. Part of Faversham Abbey. Aisled timberframed barn clad in tarred weatherboarding on red brick plinth. Hipped roof now covered in corrugated iron sheeting. Early C19 hipped cart entrance to east and lean-to to north east, Barn is 132 feet long, lying north-south and assembled from the north. Six full bays, of which the third narrower bay forms the only passage, and shored axial posts to the ends. Jowled aisled posts with slender tension braces and passing braces, three of which are missing to the south east aisle. The crown posts are nearly chamfered and clasp the collar purlin jowled on each side, with 2 head braces. Some sections of the wall frame were replaced in the early C19 and at least two bays have rafters replaced at that time. Inserted early C19 first floor to north on mezzanine floor with a wooden hoist wheel. Both arcade and wall plates have faced halved scarf joints. (See S E Rigold ‘Some Major Kentish Timber Bams; Arch. Cant. LXXXI P16 & 18. Julia Bennett . Anthony Blackwell ‘ Traditional Kent Buildings no 6 Abbey Farm, Faversham’ 1988 p16-27).
Faversham CPME13 7BL03-Aug-72TR 02111 61762
1061010WAREHOUSE IN ABBEY GREEN TO EAST OF NOS 59 TO 62 (CONSECUTIVE)C18WarehouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Warehouse in Abbey Green to East of No 59 to 62 (consec) TR 0161 NE 1/198 II GV
C18 to C19. 2 storeys. Tiled hipped roof. Red brick. On South side, pair of double wooden boarded doors on both floors at Western end. Segmental headed window and modern window and doorway at Eastern end.
Nos 59 to 64 (consec) and warehouse form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BN03-Aug-72TR 01940 61816
118619059-62, ABBEY STREETC19BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 59 to 62 (consec) TR 0161 NE 1/197 II GV
L-shaped now of small early C19 houses. 2 storeys. 5 windows to West front; 3 windows and 1 doorway to South front. Entrance to No 62 in South front. Slate hipped roof, 3 brick stacks. Red brick fronts; some refacing. Windows in frames with rubbed brick voussoirs; glazing bars intact. In West front, shutters to 2 upstairs windows; projection with bay on ground floor at Northern end. This front has 3 round-headed doorways with rubbed brick voussoirs; blocked tympana; modern verandah before coupled doorways. All the houses have recently been restored. On West side small wooden posts linked by chains of modern ironwork. To East of No 61 on South front, red brick wall with red brick coping, about 6 feet high, extends as far East as warehouse.
Nos 59 to 64 (consec) and warehouse forn a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BN03-Aug-72TR 01917 61828
134423463 AND 64, ABBEY STREETNACottageIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 63 & 64 TR 0161 NE 1/87 II GV
2 cottages built into the lower gateway of the Abbey. The ground floor part of the North and West walls are composed of masonry of the Abbey. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 hipped dormers. The front is faced with stone rubble and brick, plastered on the ground floor and with weather-boarding above. Half-hipped tiled roof. Casement windows. AM.
Nos 59 to 64 (consec) and warehouse form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7BN03-Aug-72TR 01894 61801
1115576GILLETT’S GRANARIESNAGranaryII*STANDARD QUAY 1. – 1103 Gillett’s Granaries TR 0161 NE 1/95 29.7.50. II*
Long range of granaries or storehouses. These stood within the grounds of the Abbey and perhaps were the Abbey granaries. A timber-framed building with red brick infilling on a base of stone rubble, but most of the ground floor has been rebuilt in red brick and the East side has been patched with tarred weather-boarding in places. Tiled roof with 2 projecting hips over the left doors on the 1st floor, the hips supported on brackets. 8 doors on the ground floor and 1 blocked; 5 doors on the 1st floor and 6 windows, 3 unglazed with wooden mullions and 2 with wooden shutters; 1 covered over.
Faversham CPME13 7BS29-Jul-50TR 01963 61940
1240512WAREHOUSE ABOUT 15 METRES NORTH EAST OF PROVENDER MILL (GILLETTS LIMITED)C18WarehouseIIFAVERSHAM STANDARD QUAY TR 0161 NE F 100 1/375 Warehouse about 15 metres north east of Provender Mill (Gilletts Ltd) Interior inspected GV II
Warehouse. C18 and extended early C19. Timber framed and part underbuilt with red brick on ground floor. Weather boarded with corrugated iron roofs. Original portion of 2 storeys with hipped roof, the south-east elevation with single boarded door on ground floor, the quayside elevation with red brick ground floor with casement window and boarded door and boarded loft door over. Extended to north east by early C19 block with gabled roof and blocked loft door to quayside; lean-to on roadside (south-east). Large curbing stones at the corners of both builds. Interior: the C18 range is clearly of earlier build than the adjacent warehouses, the framing and proportions of the structure are on a smaller scale and make use of squarer section timbers with larger, straight braces. A key element in the rare group of quayside warehouses preserved here, marked in situ on the 1841 tithe Map and all grouping with Provender Mill (Grade II*) opposite.
Faversham CPME13 7BS27-Sep-89TR 01957 61957
1240591WAREHOUSE ABOUT 30 METRES NORTH EAST OF PROVENDER MILL (GILLETTS LIMITED)C18WarehouseIIFAVERSHAM STANDARD QUAY TR 0161 NE F 99 1/374 Warehouse about 30 metres north east of Provender Mill (Gilletts Ltd) Interior inspected GV II
Warehouse. Early C19 in two phases. Timber framed and weather boarded with corrugated iron roofing. Main block of two storeys on plinth with curbing stones at the corners. Two boarded loft doors, to left and to right, the latter with hoist beam projecting over, with shuttered window openings. Ground floor with three boarded doors, and bricked section of wall to right with casement window. Lower single storey and left extension recessed to right with small lean-to and fenced compound, and with shuttered window in right return and boarded doors on each floor to rear, quayside, elevation. Same elevation of main block with window openings on first floor and single boarded door on ground floor, the weather boarding presumably disguising other openings. Interior: all-timber construction with timber posts carrying massive main beams, with some inserted iron posts for additional support for milling machinery. Part of an important complex of C18 and early C19 warehouses marked in situ on the 1841 Tithe Map and grouping with the Grade II* Provender Mill.
Faversham CPME13 7BS27-Sep-89TR 01979 61969
1260946OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE ABOUT 15 METRES NORTH OF PROVENDER MILL (GILLETTS LIMITED)C19OfficeIIFAVERSHAM STANDARD QUAY TR 0161 NE F 101 1/376 Office and warehouse about 15 metres north of Provender Mill (Gilletts Ltd) Interior not inspected GV II
Office and store. Circa 1840. Timber framed and weather boarded on painted brick ground floor and with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and garret, gable-on to quayside with stacks at end right and rear end right, with single sash on each elevation on first floor except to quayside, and with loft door to right return and, now a window, to quayside. Sash windows also to ground floor. Lean-to pentice to right return with half-glazed door. Part of the important group of warehouse buildings along the quayside, although slightly later than the other buildings used purely for storage.
Faversham CPME13 7BS27-Sep-89TR 01944 61951
1260981WAREHOUSE ABOUT 15 METRES NORTH WEST OF PROVENDER MILL (GILLETTS LIMITED)C19WarehouseIIHouse. Circa 1800. Painted brick with late C20 concrete interlocking tiled roofs. Two parallel main ranges with single storey and attic wing to rear. Two storeys and basement on plinth with stacks at end left and at end right. Regular fenestration of two late C20 wooden casements on each floor with basement opening to left. Central door of 6 panels, the top two glazed, with semi-circular traceried fanlight and pilastered doorcase with open pediment. The rear wings, also with casement windows, with more steeply pitched roofs may be earlier in origin. This was the mill house associated with the nearby mill, built c.1861, and its predecessor burnt in that year. Although re-roofed and refenestrated, the structure and openings remain unaltered. Interior not inspected. Included for group value with Oare Windmill. Windmill, Mill Cottage and The Mill House form a groupFaversham CPME13 7BS27-Sep-89TR 01935 61946
1344233ANCHOR COTTAGE THE ANCHOR INNC17Public HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 52 (Anchor Cottage). The Anchor Inn. TR 0161 NE 1/86
This block stands across the North end of Abbey Street facing right down it. In 1 roof span. C17 altered C18. 2 storeys. 7 windows in all. No 52 tarred weather-boarding. The Anchor Inn pebble dash with stringcourse. Tiled roof. No 52 casement windows and doorway with small flat hood over. The Anchor Inn mostly sash windows with glazing bars intact, but some casement windows and some modern windows; also 2 storey porch in the centre of the front with hipped roof.
Nos 5O to 52 (consec) Abbey Street, the Anchor Inn form a group with Nos 1 and 2 Abbey Road.
Faversham CPME13 7BS03-Aug-72TR 01937 61902
1240318OYSTER BAY HOUSEC19WarehouseIIIn the entry for:
IRON WHARF TR 06 SW ‘The Big Building’ 4/220 (Warehouse immediately north east of Standard House) – II
the address shall be amended to read:
The following building shall be added to the list: IRON WHARF 1. 1103 TR 06 SW 4/220 ‘The Big Building’ (Warehouse immediately north east of Standard House) II
Warehouse. Circa mid C19, said to have been built circa 1843 when the creek was improved. Buff-coloured stock brick. Welsh slate roof with gabled ends and brick dentil eaves cornice. Plan: Rectangular on plan. Its north end to the creek has a hoist and a doorway at each floor for loading/unloading. There is also a hoist and doorway at each floor level at the opposite south end. Exterior: 3 storeys, the second storey partly in the roof space. 5- bay east and west sides and 3-bay north and south ends, the bays divided by brick pilasters, those at the ends clasping the corners. Segmental brick arch openings with original 16-pane cast-iron windows which have bosses at the inter- sections of the glazing bars. There is a doorway on the ground floor at right of the west side with an original door and a wider doorway at the centre of the east side. The gable ends have a central doorway on each floor with plank double doors, the ground floor doorway on the south end enlarged later and on the gables at both ends a weatherboarded timber-framed hoist housing containing old hoist mechanisms; the hoist housing at the north end rises above the main roof level. Interior: not inspected.
Faversham CPME13 7BT20-Sep-88TR 02124 62038
1069409STANDARD HOUSEC18HouseIIIn the entry for: STANDARD QUAY 1. 1103 TR 0261 8/285 Standard House II
The entry shall be amended to read:
House. Circa 1840-50, possibly about 1843 when the creek was improved. Rendered brick. Plain tile roof with gabled ends. Rendered brick gable-end stacks. Plan: L-shaped on plan, the main front range with 2 principal rooms heated from gable end stacks, a central entrance and a service room in a 2-storey outshut behind the left-hand room with a stack on its left side. The house is raised up on a base- ment, presumably as a precaution against flooding at high tides. Exterior: 2 storeys, attic and basement. Symmetrical 3-window front, the centre first floor window is narrower. The windows were boarded over at the time of the inspection (August 1988) but if the original windows survive they would be sashes with glazing bars as shown on a photograph of 1975. Central doorway with original wooden door- case with deeply reeded pilasters, the mouldings continuing in the brackets supporting a flat canopy with a modillion cornice and the original 6-panel door. Two C20 flat-roof dormers at the front. The right hand end of the rear elevation projects under a catslide roof and has sash windows with glazing bars. Interior: not inspected but is expected to retain some C19 features. Note: The house might have been the home of Samuel Matthew Goldfinch, Mayor of Faversham in the Late C19 and whose shipyard was nearby. His sailing barges were said to be of outstanding quality and at least one made trans-Atlantic voyages. Source: Information provided by the Faversham Society.
STANDARD QUAY 1. – 1103 Standard House [At end of Standard Quay comprising premises of Faversham Fencing Co Ltd] TR 0261 8/285 II
C18. 2 storeys and attic; basement. 3 window bays. Tiled gabled roof with flanking chimneys; 2 flat-roofed dormers. Rendered front. Windows in reveals; glazing bars intact. Central doorway up flight of 7 steps. 6 flush panelled door in flush panelled reveals; fluted pilasters, frieze and flat hood on shaped brackets over.
Faversham CPME13 7BU03-Aug-72TR 02031 61993
1240320STABLES ABOUT 30 METRES EAST SOUTH EAST OF ABBEY FARMHOUSEC18StablesIIABBEY FIELDS 1. 1103 TR 0261 8/325 Stables about 30 metres east south east of Abbey Farmhouse. GV II
Stable range. C18. Red brick with projecting plinth, hybrid Flemish/English bond with courses of alternating headers and stretchers alternating with courses headers with occasional stretchers, Plain clay tile roof, hipped at right-hand (east) end and gabled at left(west)end. Plan: Long rectangular range with stables at the centre and right hand end and what might have been a cart-shed to the left and possibly a harness room at the extreme left (west) end. Exterior: 1 storey. Asymmetrical south front. Doorways at the centre and left and right ends of front, those to the left and right with segmental brick arches, all with boarded divided doors. Three small windows to the centre and right of front, 3 of which have segmented brick arches. To the left of front a wide opening with C20 sliding doors.
Interior: The stables have mangers and corn chests and the roof structure has straight collars with clasped purlins.
Source: Traditional Kent Buildings (1988) No. 6 pp 16-27
Faversham CPME13 7BW17-Jan-89TR 02142 61812
1268252MEDIAEVAL STABLES AT ABBEY FARMC14StablesII*FAVERSHAM
659/8/10009 ABBEY FIELDS 17-JAN-89 Mediaeval stables at Abbey Farm (Formerly listed as: ABBEY FIELDS Stables about 60 metres east south eas t of Abbey Farmhouse)
Stable. C14 or C15, extended to the south east in early C19. Built as part of the Home Farm of Faversham Abbey. Three bays remaining of a larger structure which certainly extended further eastwards and may also have extended further westwards, extended to the east in the early C19. Timberframed, clad in weatherboarding on brick and flint footings with hipped roof formerly thatched but now clad in corrugated iron sheeting. Three bay building on an east-west axis, facing north on to a mediaeval though route throough the mediaeval home farmyard. Currently divided into three compartments. The west compartment has a west doorway in the west end wall with C18 door on pintle hinges, the other two have doorways on the north side. There are boarded partitions between the bay-wide compartments. Although there are no traces of a hayloft, there is a loading hatch between the west and central compartments.
The west end wall has been rebuilt in the post-medieval period but medaeval carpentry to the other walls. The original frame is oak of relatively large scantling. From the south wall there is half of a probably original scarf joint in the sill, a simple edge-halved scarf with square vertical abutmentds. The northern wallplate has a variation of the same joint but with a vertical bladed arrangement to the lower tongue, an unusual form of scarf joint.
The main posts are rebated for horizontal butt-boarding and the infill frame set behind the rebate. In the main bays there was a central stud with arch braces each side springing from the main posts to the soffit of the wall plate. All the main timbers have pegged mortise-and-tenon joints. The eastern bay is a little narrower and has a single archbrace. On the south side there are single arch braces in the centre and eastern bays and the kingstuds have enough room between them and the main posts to east to accommodate original doorways.
The main posts have natural flared jowls and normal assembly between the post, wallplate and tiebeam. There are both existing and evidence for curving arch braces. The truss west of centre was evidently open originally whilst the one east of centre was closed, with some original studwork surviving. At the east end the tiebeam indicates that this was built as an open truss. Thus this appears to be an original two bay section to the west (with a possibility that the building once extended further west) and a one bay section to the east which certainly extended at least one bay further in that direction. It appears to have been a stable with unfixed hayloft provision and the timber manger with tethering rings against the east wall of the central bay is consistent with its use as a stable in post-medeval times.
The main section of the roof is mediaeval comprising sans purlin common rafters of relatively sturdy scantling. The couples have high collars with dovetail-shaped lap-jointed collars fixed by pegs. The hips each end are made up from reused common rafters.
HISTORY: An inventory of 1499 refers to stables and horses in the “nether court” at Faversham Abbey. Four stables are mentioned, including variously six, five, four and two horses. In addition there were four mares and the harness for four carts. It is likely thast the existing stable is one of those mentioned in this inventory.
[Canterbury Cathedral Archives, Canterbury Lit MS B 5. Julia Bennet and Anthony Blackwell in “Traditional Kent Buildings no 61” ed. Jane Wade 1988 p16,17 and 20.]
Faversham CPME13 7BW17-Jan-89TR 02164 61803
118617850 AND 51, ABBEY STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – Nos 50 & 51 TR 0161 NE 1/196 II GV
Timber-framed houses re-fronted in the C18. 2 storeys and attic. Tiled gabled roof; M-shaped at Northern end and with wing behind. Rough-cast front. 2 windows and 1 hipped dormer each. 3 light casement windows [1 2 light casement window on ground floor in No 50]. 4 flush panelled doors in shallow reveals; doorways with frames; small flat hoods on shaped brackets over.
Nos 50 to 52 (consec) Abbey Street. the Anchor Inn form a group with Nos 1 and 2 Abbey Road.
Faversham CPME13 7BZ03-Aug-72TR 01921 61871
1343857STANDARD COTTAGESC19CottageIISTANDARD QUAY – 1. 1103 Nos 1 & 2 (Standard Cottages) TR 0161 NE 1/284 II
Pair of cottages with C19 fronts but with rear wall incorporating masonry from the medieval Abbey of Faversham. 2 storeys. 1 window bay and 1 door each. Tiled roof with gable end facing street; plain bargeboard. Rendered fronts. Windows in reveals in slightly segmental arches; glazing bars intact. 4 panelled doors also in slightly segmental arches.
Faversham CPME13 7BZ03-Aug-72TR 01909 61890
10610161, BELVEDERE ROADC19BuildingIIBELVEDERE ROAD 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 1 Tll 0161 NE 1/206 II GV
Early Cl9. 2 storeys and basement; parapet. 2 windows. Tiled cabled roof. Red brick front. Windows in reveals with rubbed brick voussoirs; glazing bars intact.
No 1 forms a group with the Coal Exchange Inn, Quay Lane.
Faversham CPME13 7DA03-Aug-72TR 01630 61626
1115606THE COAL EXCHANGE INNC18Public HouseIIQUAY LANE – 1. 1103 The Coal Exchange Inn TR 0161 NE 1/97 II GV
Cl8. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 dormers. Painted brik. Cornice and blocking oource. Glaz ne bars intact on 1st floor. Modern windows below. Doorway with fluted pilasters, projecting cornice and 6-panel door.
The Coal Echange Inn forms a group with No 1 Belvedere Road.
Faversham CPME13 7DA03-Aug-72TR 01624 61632
10610003 AND 4, ABBEY STREETC15Timber-framed BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. (West Side) 1103 – Nos 3 & 4 TR 0161 NE 1/70 29.7.50. II GV
C15 Timber-framed building refronted in C18, but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on bressumer. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows, 3 dormers. Ground floor painted brick, above plastered. Eaves cornice. Tiled. roof. Glazing bars intact. No 3 has a charming C18 curved shop window with its glazing bars intact, and below it a scrolled wrought iron grille filling the space that is a shoot for goods. Doorway on each side of the shop window, the Southern one leading to the dwellinghouse above and having a very low rectangular fanlight, the Northern one being a double door that gives entrance to the shop. No 4 has a doorway with fluted pilasters and door of 6 moulded panels, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed. Both houses now in good condition.
Nos 3 to 12 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7DE29-Jul-50TR 01681 61602
106948725, COURT STREETC16HouseIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 25 TR 0l6l NE 1/29 29.7.50. II GV
L-shaped house. The North-south wing early C16 refronted in C18, but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on bressummer and bracket. Studding exposed in the North Wall. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 dormers. Stuccoed front. Moulded eaves cornice. Steeply pitched tiled roof. 2 small bays on the 1st floor, and 1 to left hand on ground floor, in which the windows have been altered to casement windows in all but one case; 3-light sash window to right hand on ground floor. The dormers have casement windows with small square-headed panes and old green glass. West wing C16 timber-framed building with squares plaster infilling.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7DE29-Jul-50TR 01664 61580
1069488WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN BEHIND NO 25 ON NORTH SIDENAWallIIC0URT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Wall enclosing garden behind No 25 on North side TR 0161 NE 1/29A II
2i Wall mostly of stone rubble off medieval origin; some brick. Incorporates a gateway and extends as far West as The Two Brewers Public House.
Faversham CPME13 7DE03-Aug-72TR 01648 61592
111632024, COURT STREETC18BuildingIICOURT STREET (West Side) No 24
C18. Two storeys and attic. Three windows. Two dormers. Red brick on a stuccoed base. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Two canted bays of three-lights on ground and first floors. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in architrave surround with pediment over supported on brackets and door of six panels, the centre two fielded and the top two cut away and glazed. Photograph in NMR. C18 panelling inside; original lead rainwater head at Northern end.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7DE29-Jul-50TR 01660 61571
1116328BOLLARD WITHIN THE CURTILAGE OF NO 25 ON THE CORNER OF COURT STREET AND QUAY LANEC17BollardIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – Bollard Within the curtilage of No 25 on the corner of Court Street and Quay Lane TR 0161 NE 1/29B II
Late C17 or early C18 cannon used as a bollard.
Faversham CPME13 7DE03-Aug-72TR 01671 61581
134381723, COURT STREETC16HouseIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 23 TR O161 NE 1/27 29.7.50. II GV
Cl8 front-to C16-Cl7 house. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 dormers. Painted brick. Stringcourse. Parapet. Steeply pitched tiled roof. The 2 southernmost window bays project. The windows on the lst floor have cambered head linings and glazing bars intact. 2 stroll modern shop fronts and between them a C17 doorway of kentish rag stone older than the facade, probably C17. This is a pointed doorway with a tooth- shaped keystone and carved spandrels set in a moulded architrave surround with projecting cornice over, probably added in the C18. 10-panel moulded door with pointed moulded tymparum over. Said to have been residence of Capt John Trowts who was mayor of Faversham in 1660 and who entertained here King Charles II with whom he had shared exile in Breda.
Nos 17 to 25 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7DE29-Jul-50TR 01653 61562
10694815, CONDUIT STREETC19BuildingIINos 1 and 2 and Oasts at Macknade Farm form a group.Faversham CPME13 7DF03-Aug-72TR 01580 61580
1116391THE TRAINING SHIP HASARDEC15Timber-framed BuildingII*CONDUIT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – The Training Ship Hasarde TR 0161 NE 1/98 29.7.50. II*
This is a C15 timber-framed structure, originally old town warehouses and now used as a Training Ship. The 1st floor overhangs on the protruding ends of the floor joists and brackets. Close-studding on ground floor and large panels of timber-framing above. Projectig eaves. Tiled roof with pentice on east side. Some original door and window openings and original plaster infilling exposed during recent restoration.
Faversham CPME13 7DF29-Jul-50TR 01584 61615
1074901TH BRENTS TAVERNC19Public HouseIIUPPER BRENTS 1. l103 (North-West Side) – No 44 (The Events Tavern) TR Ol61 NE 1/100 II
Circa 1840. 3 storeys. 3 Windows. Painted brick. Wide eaves bracket cornice. Hipped slate roof, with lead ridges. Glazing bars intact. On ground floor, 3 light sash window with centre light bowed; bays flanked by pilasters with plain fascia over. 5 steps with brick balusters leading up to wide veranda extending across whole of ront. Modern central doorway.
Faversham CPME13 7DP03-Aug-72TR 01583 61872
1320388BRIDGE HOUSEC19HouseIIUPPER BRENTS 1. ll03 (South East Side) – No 1 (Bridge House) TH 0161 NE 1/99 II GV
Formerly shown under Front Brents. Early C19. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Stuccoed. Parapet. Stringcourse. Glazing bars intact on upper floor, modern casement windows below. Recessed porch with engaged Ionic columns and dentilled cornice. Doorway with rectangular fanlight and door of 6 moulded panels.
Bridge House forms a group with Nos 1 to 13 (consec) Front Brents.
Faversham CPME13 7DQ03-Aug-72TR 01503 61664
1074900CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE EVANGELISTC19ChurchII1/292 Church of St John the Evangelist
1881, built by Kirk and Son of Sleaford in Early English style. It was built at the expense of Mrs Hall of Syndale House, Faversham, the widow of a gunpowder manufacturer in Faversham. Built of knapped flint with Bath stone dressings and tiled roofs. Nave of 5 bays with west entrance, lower chancel of three bays and south-east aisle. Lancet windows in deep embrasures. West front has nave with oculus with quatrefoil and triple lancet and arched doorcase with colonnettes. Double lancet window to aisle. All other windows are double lancets apart from tall triple lancet east window to chancel. Windows are divided by angle buttresses and roofs have cross-shaped saddlestones. Interior has arcade supported on circular columns, barrel-vaulted roof, octagonal stone font, original pews and octagonal wooden pulpit. Stained glass by Frederick Prosed. Source: BOE “North East and East Kent” p318.
Faversham CPME13 7DR03-Aug-72TR 01515 61785
1360989WILLOW TAP PUBLIC HOUSEC19Public HouseIIUPPER BRENTS 1. 1103 (South East Side) – Willow Tap Public House TA 0161 NE 1/291 II GV
Early to mid Cl9. 2 storeys. Slate roof with 2 gable ends facing street; 1 window bay in left hand gable and 2 in right hand gable. Bargecard to right hand gable. Weatherwarded front. Glazing bars intact. Ground floor in right hand part has small C19 window and 2 doorways With common fascia and cornice over. Modern single storey projection at left hand end.
Faversham CPME13 7DR03-Aug-72TR 01553 61778
1069404DAVINGTON PRIORYC12PrioryII*PRIORY ROAD 1. llO3 DAVINGTON – Davington Priory TR 0161 NW 7/148 29.7.50. II* GV
Founded in 1153. The buildings immediately adjoin the Church. They comprise the Prioress’s Parlour, the Library, the Western alley of the Cloister, the arch of the Lavatorium and the Norman doorway of the Re- fectory. They form an L-shape. The best front faces East. The ground floor is medieval work of chequered stone and flints. Above it is a timber-framed structure with a plastered front, colour- washed and over-hanging on a moulded bressummer. 4 gables with moulded bressummers, bargeboards and pendants. The Southernmost 1 is over a projecting wing and has scalloped bargeboards, a cove beneath the bressummer and a cartouche in the gable. Balancing this projection at the North end of the front is a 2-storey porch. Beyond it is a small wing backing on to the Church which forms an L with the main building. Externally this is apparently Cl8 with a modern addition at its East end. The West front of the main building, which is the entrance front, has been modernised. The ground floor is of stone, above plastered, with 4 gables having moulded bressummers, billet-moulded bargeboards and pendants. Tiled roof, Modern windows. The stained glass artist Thomas Willement was responsible for most of the Cl9 alterations; he also incorporated some medieval stained glass into his design for the interior.
Davington Priory, Walls and Postern and Church of St Mary Magdalene form a group with Raven’s Court Wall enclosing Raven’s Court and Raven’s Court Cottage, Brent Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT29-Jul-50TR 01092 61743
1069405WALL AND POSTERN GATE TO EAST OF DAVINGTON PRIORYC19WallIIPRIORY ROAD 1. llO3 DAVINGTON – Wall and Postern gate to East of Davington Priory TR 0161 NW 7/148B II GV
C19 postern gate of store in Norman style approached by steps from Davington Hill. High medieval wall of stone and flint rubble extends North and North-west of this as far as pair of stone gate piers adjoining Churchyard wall. Buttresses of stone rubble partly restored in brick. Wall of stone and flinth rubble extends South of postern gate as far as No 8 Davington Hill.
Davington Priory, Walls and Postern and Church of St Mary Magdalene form a group with Raven’s Court Wall enclosing Raven’s Court and Raven’s Court Cottage, Brent Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01139 61743
1069406CHURCH OF ST MARY MAGDALENEC12ChurchIFAVERSHAM
659/7/149 PRIORY ROAD 29-JUL-50 DAVINGTON CHURCH OF ST MARY MAGDALENE
Nave of former Benedictine priory church, now an Anglican church. Mostly C12 but repaired and fitted out by Thomas Willement, antiquarian, and stained glass artist, in 1845. MATERIALS: Stone rubble and flint with evidence of external render; red tiled roof with patterned tiles to the tower roof. PLAN: nave, north aisle and south-west tower (north-west tower missing); north-west porch by Willement, north-east vestry. EXTERIOR: the north aisle has an almost flat roof with five lancet windows. The nave clerestory has larger round-headed windows and the remnant of the fallen north-west tower is covered by a tiled lean-to projection at the west end. The Willement porch is timber-framed and tile-hung with fancy pierced bargeboards and re-used C15 timber moulded jambs with blind quatrefoils above urn stops. The east wall of the church has a Willement triple lancet, a trefoil in the gable and buttresses. The west end of the church has a richly-decorated C12 west doorway with some restoration but the carved decoration is apparently untouched. The 3 round-headed windows above are possibly C18 restorations externally (they appear to pre-date the Willement restoration as they appear in a watercolour by H Petrie of 1807), as are the 2 round-headed windows in the gable. The 4-stage south-west tower has a C19 upper stage and pyramidal roof. The tower is plain with freestone bands marking the stages and round-headed windows. It is unclear when the north-west tower was demolished but there is a reference to it having a single tower in 1692. The north wall of the house abuts the south side of the tower and church. INTERIOR: the north aisle has an arcade of plain round-headed arches on square section piers with moulded abaci, the arches into the base of the towers being larger. Pointed chamfered arches to north and south on the east wall, now blind, once gave access to the former eastern arm of the church through what was a stone rood screen. A C12 doorway on the south side formerly led into the north cloister walk. Canted plastered roof with two very crooked tie beams. At the west end on the south side, 3 moulded corbels support a wall plate. Medieval timbers are thought to survive above the plaster (information from the incumbent). One of the south side windows (now internal as a result of the development of the house) has two bays of C12 style arcading across the embrasure; this is likely to be a Willement introduction. Willement timber drum pulpit on an octagonal stem incorporates C17 panels of the Resurrection and 4 evangelists. Fine Caen stone font dated 1847 by John Thomas with a semi-circular bowl carved with figures on a short stem with waterleaf decoration at the base. Plain chairs to the nave. Willement stained glass, perhaps his best work, the triple lancet with figure scenes from the life of Christ in medallions, the aisle windows including the symbols of the evangelists. 1847 organ by Joseph Walker. Traces of Willement wallpaintings can be seen behind later layers of paint. Engravings in the vestry show the church with Willement’s decoration and a screen, which has since been removed. HISTORY: the Church of St Mary Magdalene is sited on Davington Hill, above the town of Faversham, and is unusual in that it was originally the church of St Magdalene’s Priory, founded as a Benedictine nunnery in 1153. The priory had 26 nuns at its foundation, but was never formally dissolved in the Henrician Dissolution as there were no nuns left by 1536. In 1546 the priory was sold by the Crown to Sir Thomas Cheyne, treasurer of Henry VIII’s household. The nave of the church was not dismantled as it was used for parish worship, although the choir was demolished in 1580. In 1845 the antiquarian and stained glass artist, Thomas Willement, an important figure in the Gothic Revival, purchased the remains of the priory (where he developed the private house, Davington Priory, constructed out of the west range of the priory cloister, separately listed Grade II*) and undertook extensive restoration of the church. Administratively the church remained a private chapel until 1932 when it was acquired by the Church of England. It has the unusual distinction of not being a parochial church but rather the property of the Church of England as a body. SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: originally built as the church for the Benedictine Davington Priory, the Church of St Mary Magdalene is a fine, if austere, example of late-Norman ecclesiastical architecture. Much of its C12 fabric remains and it retains part of its cloister in the form of Davington Priory house. The Victorian restoration of the church (and the house) by Thomas Willement, an authority on heraldry, stained glass artist and associate of Pugin and Salvin, is of great interest in the history of the Gothic Revival, not least because Willement described it in his `Historical Sketch of the Parish of Davington, in the County of Kent and of the Priory there’ (1862).
Sources Pevsner, North East and East Kent, 1983, 279-280 ‘St Mary Magdalene and St Lawrence, Davington’, Sheet of information in the church, n.d. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Stanley A Shepherd), Willement, Thomas (1786-1871), writer on heraldry and stained-glass artist, 2004-2005
Faversham CPME13 7DT29-Jul-50TR 01098 61753
1069472RAVENSCOURTC15BuildingIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Ravens court TR 0161 NW 7/151 II GV
Possibly C15, but refaced with cement. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Tiled roof. Casement windows. 3 small bays on the ground floor. Doorway with pilasters, flat hood over supported on brackets and 6-panel door.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group. Also Ravencoourt. Wall enclosing Ravenscourt. Ravenscourt Cottage form a group with Davington Priory. Walls and Postern Gate Church of St Mary Magdalene Priory Road and Rose Cottage, Davington Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01157 61740
1069473RAVENSCOURT COTTAGEC18CottageIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Ravenscourt Cottage TR 0161 NW 7/211 II GV
Late C18. L-shaped building with south wall incorporated into wall enclosing Raven’s Court on South side. 1 storey. Hipped tiled roof. Red brick front. 1 sash window. Doorway to right hand before passageway between Cottage and adjoining out house.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group. Also Ravenscourt. Wall enclosing Ravenscourt. Ravenscourt Court Cottage form a group with Davington Priory, Walls and Postern Gate Church of St Mary Magdelene. Priory Road and Rose Cottage, Davington Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01165 61725
1320323WALL IN GARDEN TO DAVINGTON PRIORY TO WEST OF HOUSENAWallIIPRIORY ROAD 1. llO3 DAVINGITON – Wall in garden to Davington Priory to West of house TR 0161 NW 7/148A II GV
Short length of medieval wall to West of house; stone rubble; incorporates parpendicular moulded archway.
Davington Priory, Walls and Postern and Church of St Mary Magdalene form a group with Raven’s Court Wall enclosing Raven’s Court and Raven’s Court Cottages, Brent Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01067 61730
1343838ROSE COTTAGEC19CottageIIDAVINGTON HILL 1. – 1103 Rose Cottage Tii 0161 NW 7/227 II GV
Early C19. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Hipped slate roof. Weather-boarded front. Windows 3 panes wide. Narrow casement window at right hand end. Wooden boarded door with small flat hood on brackets over. 1 storey lean-to extension at North-east end.
Rose Cottage forms a group Raven’s Court and barn behind Nos 1 and 2 (Brent Hill Bungalow), Brent Hill and with Davington Priory, Church of St Mary Magdalene and walls, Priory Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01145 61782
1343847WALL ENCLOSING RAVENSCOURT ON NORTH, WEST AND SOUTH SIDESC18WallIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. l103 (North-East Side) – Wall enclosing Ravenscourt on North, West and South Sides TR 0161 NW 7/151A II GV
Possibly C18. Red brick with red brick plinth and red brick capping. Extends all round house on North, West and South sides.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group. Also Ravenscourt. Wall enclosing Ravenscourt, Ravenscourt Court Cottage form a group with Davington Priory, Walls and Postern Gate Church of St Mary Magdelene. Priory Road and Rose Cottage, Davington Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7DT03-Aug-72TR 01146 61747
10609991 AND 2, ABBEY ROADC18BuildingIIABBEY ROAD – 1. 1103 Nos 1 & 2 TR 0161 NE 1/193 II GV
C18. 2 storeys with single storey lean-to annexe at either end. Tiled half-hipped roof. Pebble dash front. 3 window bays. Windows 4 panes wide in reveals; glazing bars missing in left hand ground floor window in No 1. Modern doors but with mid C19 moulded stuccoed cornices on console brackets over.
Nos 1 and 2 form a group with Nos 5O to 52 (consec) Anchor Inn Abbey Street.
Faversham CPME13 7DU03-Aug-72TR 01965 61900
12610893, ABBEY ROADC19HouseIIThe following building shall be added to the list:
FAVERSHAM ABBEY ROAD TR 0161 NE (south side) F 97 1/350 No 3 Interior not inspected GV II
House. Early C19. Rendered with slate roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with stack to left. Two glazing bar sashes on first floor and one to left on ground floor all with vertical glazing bars only. Door of 6 panels to right in high quality panelled recessed doorway and moulded surround with flat hood on moulded brackets Part of a good group of buildings in this area with important townscape value.
Faversham CPME13 7DU27-Sep-89TR 01992 61856
1069484BOLLARD WITHIN THE CURTILAGE OF NOS 8 AND 9 ON THE CORNER OF PARTRIDGE LANE AND COURT STREETC17BollardIICOURT STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – Bollard within the curtailage of Nos 8 & 9 on the corner of Partridge Lane & Court Street TR 0161 SE 3/22A Court Street II
Late Cl7 or early C18 cannon used as a bollard.
Faversham CPME13 7DX03-Aug-72TR 01606 61471
11163818 AND 9, COURT STREETC17BuildingIICOURT STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 8 & 9 TR 0161 SE 3/22 11.5.70. II GV
1 building. Cl8 front to a C17 timber-framed building. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows and 2 hipped dormers facing East, 2 windows and 2 hipped dormers facing North. Stuccoed. Moulded wooden eaves bracket cornice. Slight overhang to 1st floor on both fronts. 2 bays on the 1st floor of East front. C19 shop front. Tiled roof. Tall chimney.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7DX04-May-70TR 01599 61467
134381610, 11 AND 11A, COURT STREETC15BuildingIICOURT STREET l. ll03 (West Side) – No l0 Nos 11 & llA Tli 0161 SE 3/23 11.11.70. II GV
1 building. C15 hall with plastered front and 1st floor overhanging on a bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys. 3 Windows. Eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof. Modern bays on the lst floor. C19 shop fronts. C18 door of 6 fielded panels with rectangular fanlight over.
Nos 1 to 11 (consec) and 11A form a group with Nos 4 to 7 (consec) and No 7A The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7DX11-Nov-70TR 01606 61482
13438712 AND 3, PARTRIDGE LANEC15Timber-framed HouseIIPARTRIDGE LANE 1. – ll03 Nos 2 & 3 (formerly listed as No 2) Tli O16l SE 3/101 4.5.70. II GV
Cl5 timber-framed building refronted in modern times but retaining the overhang of its lst floor on a bressummer and brackets. Ground floor fronted with weather-boarding above stuccoed. Asbestos tiled roof. Modern windows. 2 storeys. 4 windows.
Nos 2 to 5 (consec) form a group with Nos 8 and 9 Court Street.
Faversham CPME13 7DX04-May-70TR 01587 61474
1069478BRENT HILL COTTAGESC19CottageIIBRENT HILL, DAVINOTON 1. 1103 (South-West Side) – Nos 1 & 2 (Brent Hill Cottages) TR 0161 NW 7/216 II GV
Early C19. 2 storeys. Main front faces South. Stuccoed front. 2 windows. Hipped slate roof; overhanging eaves. Windows in reveals, glazing bars intact. Round-headed doorways; original surface of doors covered over; blocked tympana. Entrances now at side. Later lean-to annexe to East side. North front, flush with street, is of red brick. 0riginally, cottages belonged to the Home Gunpowder Works.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EE03-Aug-72TR 01239 61684
1116435WALL TO NOS 1 AND 2 (BRENT HILL COTTAGES) ON NORTH WEST AND SOUTH EAST SIDESC18WallIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (South-West Side) – Wall to Nos 1 & 2 (Brent Hill Cottages) on North-west and South-east side TR 0161 NW 7/216A II GV
Cl8 and later red brick and yellow brick wall rising westward from house in steps and terminating at a point opposite No 1 Brent Hill Bungalow. Gate pier with stone cap at westernmost end. To East of house, gateway with segmental arch and plain brick pilasters; stone capping. Contemporary gate. To East of this, C18 to C19 red brick wall descending eastwards and then southwards down hill into Flood Lane. Pair of gate pier flanking entrance to former Home Gunpowder Works at Stonebridge Ponds (now allotment gardens). Whole course of wall formerly enclosed this part of the gunpowder works, situated to the South of Brent Hill
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EE03-Aug-72TR 01248 61685
1343851WALL TO SYCAMORE LODGENAWallIIBRENT HILL, DAVINOTON 1. l103 (North-East Side) – Wall to Sycamore Lodge TR 0161 NW 7/215A
High brick wall, contemporary with house, running down hill to quay. Brick piers with stone capping flanking former gateway in South-west corner at bottom of hill.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EE03-Aug-72TR 01286 61672
1069474BRENT HILL BUNGALOWC18BuildingIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. l103 (North-East Side) – Nos 1 & 2 (Brent Hill Bungalow) TR 0l6l NW 7/212 II GV
C18. 1 storey. Tiled roof with hip to East. Red brick front; red brick eaves cornice. Passageway through block in centre leads to entrances on North side. 2 modern casement windows with glazing bars on either side of this.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EF03-Aug-72TR 01197 61718
1069475BARN TO NORTH OF NOS 1 AND 2 (BRENT HILL BUNGALOW)NABarnIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Barn to North of Nos 1 & 2 (Brent Hill Bungalow) TR 0161 NW 7/213 II GV
Aisled barn. 8 bays and 1 end bay at West end. Very low steeply pitched roof covered with corrugated iron, hipped at West end. Low weather-boarded walls. In 6th bay from West end, tall pair of wooden boarded doors with large hipped projection on shaped brackets over. Used as a store.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EF03-Aug-72TR 01199 61757
1069476WALL AND GATE PIERS ENCLOSING GARDENS TO THE LAWN AND HILLSIDE ON THE SOUTH WEST SIDEC18WallIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Wall and (gate piers enclosing gardens to The Lawn and Hillside on the South-west side TR 0161 NW 7/152A II GV
C18. Wall of red brick. Pair of tall brick gate piers with stone caps at West end, flanking entrance to The Lawn. Narrow Gateway at East end, to Hillside; gateway with segmental headed arch, flanked by pair of gate piers similar to those before The Lawn.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EF03-Aug-72TR 01224 61705
1343848OUTHOUSE TO THE WEST OF NOS 1 AND 2 (BRENT HILL BUNGALOW)C18OuthouseIIBRENT HILL, DAVIGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Outhouse to tHe West of nOS 1 & 2 (Brent Hill Bungalow) Tr 0161 NW 7/212 II GV
Higher Cl8 block. 2 storeys and attic facing North. Red brick with red tiled hipped roof. To North, windows and doors on ground floor with segmental heads and 1 pair of modern double doors.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EF03-Aug-72TR 01180 61720
1343849HILLSIDE THE LAWNC18HouseIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. l103 (North-East Side) – The Lawn Hillside TR 0161 NW 7/152 29.7.50. II GV
Large late Cl8 or early C19 house now divided into 2 storeys. 6 windows. Red brick. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. The original doorway of the house is in the part called The Lawn. This has pilasters and projecting cornice supported on bracketry The West front of the house has 2 bay windows on tile ground floor. Originally the house belonged to the houseGunpowder works.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EF29-Jul-50TR 01239 61750
1320350WALL ENCLOSING CHURCH YARD ON NORTH EAST, NORTH WEST AND SOUTH WEST SIDESNAWallIIPRIORY ROAD 1. llO3 DAVINOTON – Wall enclosing Church yard on North-east, NoTh-west and South-west Sides TR O161 NW 7/149A II GV
Wall on North-west side includes some medieval stone; wall of flint and stone rubble with rendered coping. About 9 feet high. Wall on North-east side lower, but built of similar material.
Davington Priory Walls and Postern and Church of St Mary Magdalene form a group with Raven’s Court Wall enclosing Raven’s Court and Raven’s Court Cottage Brent Hill.
Faversham CPME13 7EJ03-Aug-72TR 01083 61781
1343856DAVINGTON FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseIIBarn. C17. Timber framed on flint plinth and clad with weather board and corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with sloping mid-stray. Interior: 5 bays with aisles, passing shores to arcade posts, cambered tie- beams, clasped purlin roof with wind bracing.Faversham CPME13 7EJ03-Aug-72TR 01074 61834
1067529107, WEST STREETC19HouseIIWEST STREET 1. l103 (North Side) – No 107 TR 0161 SW 2/135 II GV
Early Cl9 house refront with cement. 3 storeys. 1 window. Parapet. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. C19 shop window and 6-panel door.
Nos 102 to 107 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EN03-Aug-72TR 01447 61435
1067557102 AND 103, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – Nos 102 & 103 TR O161 SW 2/132 II GV
1 building. Cl6 timber-framed building, refronted in Cl8 but preserving the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressummer. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Ground floor painted brick, 1st floor has asbestos panels. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. No l03 has a small shop window with its glazing bars Intact, Otherwise glazing bars missing. C19 shop window to no 102.
Nos 102 to 107 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EN03-Aug-72TR 01428 61441
1067604104, WEST STREETC17BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. l103 (North Side) – TR 0l6l SW 2/133 II GV
Similar Cl7 building, but with higher elevation aid attic storey with 2 hipped dormers. Ground floor modern shop front, now boarded up; above painted brick with 2 bays, their glazing bars intact.
Nos 102 to 107 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EN03-Aug-72TR 01435 61439
1067605105 AND 106, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – TR 0161 SW 2/134 4.5.70. Nos 105 &106 II GV
1 building. C16 timber-framed building refronted with cement. lst floors jettied on bressummer and carved brackets. 2 gables. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Early C19 shop front to 106; mid to later C19 shop front to no 105.
Nos 102 to 107 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7EN04-May-70TR 01442 61437
1389585PROOF HOUSE APPROXIMATELY 10 METRES SOUTH SOUTH WEST OF GATE HOUSE, MARSH WORKSC18Proof House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Proof house at gunpowder works, disused. 1800-10. Brick with pyramidal slate roof.
PLAN: Square single-cell plan.
EXTERIOR: Segmental-arched doorway and flanking windows with sashes. Roof has a lantern on top.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery which was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. This included dedicated proof houses, the first of which were built in 1804, and this is probably the oldest example. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The proof house, a type of laboratory for testing powder by flashing it, was added in the early C19 refurbishment of the refinery. The roof lantern was intended to admit light and let out the fumes. Associated with the late C18-early C19 saltpetre refinery at the Marsh Works (qv), the best preserved of this type in the country and comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
Faversham CPME13 7ER14-Dec-01TR 01341 62363
1389586GATE HOUSE MARSH WORKSC19Gate House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Gate house at entrance to gunpowder works, now house. 1800-10, with later extension. Flemish bond brick with slate roof and brick stacks. Double-depth plan, with extension to left (SW) of front.
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys. Gauged brick flat arches over late C19 2/2-pane sashes flanking panelled door in canted bay to right, with timber lintel over similar sash to first floor. Two similar windows to range on left and to left return, which has C19 timber porch with swept roof to panelled door.
HISTORY: The Marsh Works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. It played an important part in the improvement of British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. A saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The gatehouse was added as part of the refurbishment of the site in the early C19, at the entrance to the works and close to the Proof House (qv) for testing powder. The bed of a testing mortar is located in the garden.
Faversham CPME13 7ER14-Dec-01TR 01352 62387
118614829 AND 30, ABBEY STREETC18Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 29 & 39 TR 0161 NE 1/83 29.7.50. II GV
Pair of timber-framed houses with C18 fronts. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window and 1 dormer each. Stuccoed. Modillion cornice and parapet. Tiled roof. Curved window on ground and lst floors of both houses. Glazing bars intact. Pair of doorways with pilasters, projecting cornice over and doors of 6 panels, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed, the centre 2 fielded.
Nos 14 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7FB29-Jul-50TR 01781 61711
129933034, ABBEY STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIIABBEY STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – No 34 TR 0161 NE 1/85 29.7.50. II GV
Timber-framed building, formerly the Globe inn built in 15l4. Refronted in the Cl8 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressummer. 2 storeys. 3 windows and 1 original opening at North end on 1st floor. Ground floor painted brick with corner post exposed at the South end. 1st floor plastered. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on the 1st floor. 2 bays below with modern windows. Original doorway between them with depressed arch, small shields in the spandrels and wide ribbed door. Some original features within. Photograph NMR.
Faversham CPME13 7FB29-Jul-50TR 01796 61728
134423231 AND 32, ABBEY STREETC19BuildingIIABBEY STREET 1. (West Side) 1l03 – TR 0161 NE 1/84 4.5.70. No 31 3.9.69. No 32 II GV
Early C19. 3 storeys. 1 window each. Red brick. Dentilled eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof. Glasing bars intact. Small bay on ground and 1st floors. Doorway in moulded architrave surround with flat hood over.
Nos l4 to 32 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7FB03-Sep-69TR 01787 61717
134423581, ABBEY STREETC15Timber-framed houseII*ABBEY STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 81 TR 0161 NE 1/89 29.7. 50. II* GV
C15 timber-framed cottage that also was part of the Abbey buildings. The 1st floor is jettied on the West and North sides on moulded bressummers and bracke attached to the corner post. On the North side there is also a gable overhanging in similar fashion. The North and West fronts are studded. Tiled. roof. Sash windows with glazing bars intact and some original window openings with small panels of lead glazing. 2 storeys. 1 window. AM. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 80 and 81 Wall enclosing garden behind No 80 form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7FB29-Jul-50TR 01817 61715
1069477DAVINGTON MANORC18Manor HouseIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (North-East Side) – Davington Manor TR 0161 NW 7/214 II GV
C18. 2 storeys. 6 windows. Tiled roof. Red brick front. Centre 2 bays project slightly. Windows with glazing bars, some 3 panes and some 4 pane wide; now partly covered over; rubbed brick voussoirs. 4 windows on 1st floor with segmental heads. Doorway with rectangular fanlight and rubbed brick voussoir. At present, in a neglected condition. Large ilex tree in garden.
All the listed buildinvs in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7HP03-Aug-72TR 01262 61765
1343850WALLS ENCLOSING GARDEN TO DAVINGTON MANOR ON WEST, EAST AND SOUTH EAST SIDESNAWallIIBRENT HILL, DAVINGTON 1. 1l03 (North-East Side) – Walls enclosing garden to Davington Manor on West, East and South East sides TR 0161 NW 7/214A II GV
High garden wall of red brick contemporary with house. Brick plinth and brick capping. Modern gateway in South-east side.
All the listed buildings in Brent Hill form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7HP03-Aug-72TR 01297 61747
1115586THE BULL INNC15Public HouseIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 1 TR 0161 SW 2/156 29.7.5O. (The Bull Inn) II GV
C15. Timber-framed building with 1st floor overhanging on heavy corner brackets, and, on the North side, also on the protruding ends of the floor joists. The 2 centre window bays on the West side projects a little more than the rest of the lst floor. Fronted with stucco. Tiled roof. Modern windows. 2 storeys. 4 windows facing West and 1 North.
No 1 (The Bull Inn) Nos 2 to 4 (consec) and 6 to 9 (consec) form a group with Warehouse (Premises occupied by G Twvman and Son Ltd) and No 64, West Street.
Faversham CPME13 7JA29-Jul-50TR 01171 61453
107491014, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 14 TR 0161 SW 2/111 II
C18. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window. 1 dormer. Stuccoed. Wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on the 1st floor. Modern shop window.
Faversham CPME13 7JB03-Aug-72TR 01464 61410
135663613, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 13 TR 0161 SW 2/300 II
Late C18. 2 storeys. 2-bays. Parapet with capping. Windows 3 panes wide in reveals; rubbed brick voussoir. Deep modern fascia with moulded cornice over; modern shop front beneath with pilasters at either end.
Faversham CPME13 7JB03-Aug-72TR 01470 61406
1356689114, WEST STREETC17HouseIIWEST STREET 1. l103 (North Side) – No 114 TR 0161W 2/136 II GV
Large Cl7 house. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 dormers. Stuccoed. Wide eaves cornice with carved brackets. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Modern shop front. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 114 to 117 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JB03-Aug-72TR 01489 61417
1067607116, WEST STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – No 116 TR 0161 SE 3/137 29.7.50. II GV
Restored Cl6 timber-framed house. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Plastered front. The lst floor jettied on bressummer. 2 gables also overhanging on bressummer and brackets. Tiled roof. 2 bays on lst floor with modern easement windows in them. Modern shop front.
Nos 114 to 117 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JE29-Jul-50TR 01506 61407
10749087, WEST STREETC16Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1l03 (South Side) – No 7 TR 0161 SE 3/107 II GV
C16. Timber-framed house refront in the C18. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window. 1 large gabled dormer, plastered but with some timber in it. Stuccoed front. Parapet. Glazing bars missing. Modern shop front.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place
Faversham CPME13 7JE03-Aug-72TR 01503 61386
1074909THE SUN INNC15Public HouseIICl5. Timber-framed building, refronted but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on bressummer and modern brackets. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Ground floor painted brick. First floor plastered. No 10 has 2 gables, No 11 an eaves cornice. Tiled roofs. Sash windows on the lst floor with glazing bars intact. In No 10 modern windows below to left hand; 5-light sash window with shutters to right hand. No 11 has semi-circular arched doorway and 6 panel door in reveals.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7JE04-May-70TR 01490 61394
13566414 AND 5, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1l03 (South Side) –
Nos 4 & 5 TR 0161 SE 3/105 II GV
C18 front to a C16 building, with the lst floor still slightly jettied on carved brackets, though altered. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 gabled dormers. Painted brick. Wooden modillion eaves cornice on brackets. Tiled roof. 2 bays with casement windows on the 1st floor. Modern shop front.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7JE03-Aug-72TR 01512 61378
135664412, WEST STREETC17BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 12 Tli 0161 SW 2/110 29.7.50. II GV
C18 front to a C17 timber-framed core. 2 storeys. 3 windows. 3 dormers. Mathematical tiles. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in moulded arohitrave surround with projecting cornice, rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (oonsec) form a group with Nos l4 to l6 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7JE29-Jul-50TR 01476 61402
1356690119, WEST STREETC16Timber-framed houseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – No 119 TR 0161 SE 3/138 II
C16 timber-framed house refronted with plaster, the ground floor underbuilt. Gable. Sash window on 1st floor with glazing bars intact. Modern shop front. 2 storeys. 1 window.
Faversham CPME13 7JE03-Aug-72TR 01523 61392
13609936, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 6 TR 0l6l SE 3/106 II GV
Circa l830 front to C16 building. 3 storeys. 1 window. Dirty white brick. Cornice and parapet. Former contemporary shop front, consisting of 6 detachable wooden shutters, has been replaced by a modern plate- glass shop front and doorway with deep fascia; C19 flat hood on brackets over.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7JE03-Aug-72TR 01506 61382
13609948 AND 9, WEST STREETC15Timber-framed houseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 8 & 9 TR 0161 SW 2/108 4.5.70. TR 0161 SE 3/108 II GV
1 building. Cl5. Timber-framed building altered in the Cl8 but retaining the overhang of its lst floor on a bressumer and brackets. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Modern shop fronts. Above plastered front. Wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Casement windows. Passage through the ground floor of No 8 with timber-framing and brick infilling visible in the west wall. Behind the passage the west wall of No 8, which is weatherboarded, overhangs on the 1st floor on the protruding ends of the floor joists and brackets.
Nos 1 and 2 and Nos 4 to 12 (consec) form a group with Nos 14 to 16 (consec) The Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7JE04-May-70TR 01496 61389
106756015-17, WEST STREETC17Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 15 to 17 (consec) TR 0161 SW 2/112 4.5.70. II
C17 timber-framed range, refronted in the C18 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressummer and 1 bracket. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 3 dormers. Ground floor painted brick with C19 shop window in nos 15 and 17. 1st floor stuccoed. Eaves cornice. Tiled roofs. No 17 retains on its 1st floor an original 4-light bay window in wooden frame with wooden mullions, trace of a cove beneath and casement windows formerly with small square leaded panes. The other 1st floor windows are sash windows with their glazing bars missing.
Faversham CPME13 7JF04-May-70TR 01453 61416
106756118, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 18 TR 0161 SW 2/113 II
C18 front to Cl6 building. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Painted brick. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. C19 shop front, Which has been modernized.
Faversham CPME13 7JF03-Aug-72TR 01443 61418
107491120, WEST STREETC18HouseIIWEST STREET 1. l103 (South Side – No 20 (Formerly listed as TR 0161 SW 2/114 Nos 20 & 21) 29.7.50. II
Cl8 house now divided into 2 storeys and attic, 3 windows and 2 dormers, plus extension to the east of lower elevation (2 storeys and 2 windows). Painted brick. Wooden modillion eaves cornice in the west. Hipped tiled roofs. Glazing bars intact. Roundheaded doorway with semi-circular fanlight and 6-Panel door. Segmental headed windows on ground floor to right hand; modern window to left hand. (No 19 is also a part of Swale Rural District Council Offices but is a C19 building which does not merit inclusion.)
Faversham CPME13 7JF29-Jul-50TR 01429 61421
135665098, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – No 98 TR 0161 SW 2/311 II GV
Late Cl8. 3 storeys. 2 window bays. Tried hipped roof. Painted brick. Windows in reveals; glazing bars intact. On ground floor, modern contemporary style bow fronted shop window with brick stall- riser and brick pilaster at east end. At left hand end, a 6 panelled door in reveals; top 2 panels out away and glazed.
Nos 93 to 98 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JF03-Aug-72TR 01395 61444
106755193 AND 93A, WEST STREETC19Timber-framed HouseIIEarly C19 front to a timber-framed house. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows [1 blocked]. 2 dormers. Stuccoed. Cornice and parapet. Slate roof. Modern glass in windows. Doorway with grooved pilasters. projecting cornice, semi-circular fanlight and door of 4 fielded panels.
Nos 93 to 98 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JG04-May-70TR 01364 61446
1067564MECHANICS ARMSC17BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. llO3 (South Side) – No 44 (Mechanics Arms) TR 0161 SW 2/307 II
Early C19 front to a C17 probably timber-framed building; low steeply pitched tiled roof and north-south wing behind; east side roughcast. North side fronted with mathematical tiles. 3 storeys. 2 bays. Moulded eaves cornice. On both lst and 2nd floors, sash windows 3 panes wide in reeded frames, ornamented with roundels in corners; painted brink voussoirs above 1st floor windows. Public house front with frieze and projecting cornice on ground floor; 4-light window flanked by doorway at either side. At right hand, doorway with frame similar to windows above [reeded frame with roundels in corners]. 6 nush panelled door in flush panelled reveals; very small rectangular fanlight over. Advertisement between 1st and 2nd floors.
Faversham CPME13 7JG03-Aug-72TR 01280 61441
107491330 AND 31, WEST STREETC17CottageIIWESRT STREET 1. ll03 (south Side) – Nos 30 & 3l TR 0161 SW 2/118 II
C17 cottages. 2 storeys. 2 windows each. Painted brick. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roofs. Glazing bars intact on the lst floor. 3 small bays below without glazing bars. Doors with 4 flush panels and architrave frames [2 doors to no 3l].
Faversham CPME13 7JG03-Aug-72TR 01357 61428
107491433, WEST STREETC19BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 33 TR 0161 SW 2/306 II
Early C19. 3 storeys. 2 bays. Rendered. Cornice and parapet. Band at 1st floor sill level. Flash windows in reveals; glazing bars intact. On ground floor, elliptical headed sash window in reveals to right hand; to left hand, elliptical headed doorway; 6 panelled door with 4 moulded panels, in reveals; small elliptical fanlight over.
Faversham CPME13 7JG03-Aug-72TR 01341 61427
106760173 AND 74, WEST STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET (North Side) Nos.73 and 74
C18 front to a C15 timber-framed building. Two storeys and attic. Two windows. Two dormers. No.75 painted brick, No.74 stuccoed. Parapet. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact in No.73 only. C19 shop window in No.74, flanked by pilasters and moulded frieze with projecting cornice over.
Faversham CPME13 7JH03-Aug-72TR 01225 61474
107491551-54, WEST STREETC17BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – Nos 51 to 54 (consec) TR 0l6l SW 2/120A II GV
Range of Cl7 cottages; refronted in early Cl9. 2 storeys. 1 window bay and 1 door each. Tiled roofs behind; slate gabled roof in front. Rendered. Moulded eaves cornice. Moulded band above ground floor. Nos 51 and 54 have a sash window each on both 1st and ground floors; windows 3 panes wide in frames. Modern 2-light windows to no 52, casement windows with glazing bars to no 51. To left hand in each house, door in frames; modern doors.
Nos 5l to 63 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JH03-Aug-72TR 01238 61454
135664663, WEST STREET, 55-62, WEST STREETC15Timber-framed houseIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – 29.7.50. Nos 55 to 62 (consec) 4.5.70. No 63 TR 0l6l SW 2/121 II GV
With No 63. Range of Cl5-16 timber-framed houses, altered in the C18 or since but preserving the overhang of the 1st floor on a bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys (Nos 57 to 61 with attic and 14 dormers.) ll windows in all. The lst floor of Nos 55 and 65 has the timbering exposed with brick infilling and of the others is plastered. Eaves cornice. Tiled roofs, Nos 59 and 60 and 6l replaced by slates). Nos 55 and 56 have C19 windows on the 1st floor but early C19 shop windows on the ground floor, 1 curved, with their glazing bars intact. Hoe 57, 58 and 60 have C19 shop windows. No 59 is painted brick on the ground floor and has a small bay window. Nos 61 is plastered. Nos 62 and 65 are roughcast. Sash windows on 1st floor (except No 61), with their glazing bars intact. No 61 has casement windows.
Nos 51 to 63 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JH04-May-70TR 01209 61461
135664866-71, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST SIDE 1. 1103 (North Side) – Nos 66 to 71 (consec) TR 0161 SW 2/123A II
C18. 2 storeys and attic; cellars. 1 window bay and 1 door each. Tiled roof. Hipped dormer to nos 66 and 71; flat roofed dormers to nos 67 to 70. Nos 66 to 69 painted brick; nos 70 and 71 brick. Moulded brick eaves cornice. Door to left hand in each house; on 1st floor above in each house a blocked window opening. Sash windows with frames to each house except to no 66 which has modern metal framed casement windows; glazing bars intact except in no 70 and in lower window in no 67. Segmental arched windows with rubbed brick voussoirs on ground floor. Doors in frames with moulded friezes and moulded projecting cornices over; flush panelled doors to nos 68 to 70.
Faversham CPME13 7JH03-Aug-72TR 01199 61479
106760065, WEST STREETC17Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – No 65 TR 0161 SW 2/123 4.5.70. II
C17 timber-framed house, refronted in the Cl9 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressummer. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Plastered. Tiled roof. Modern casement windows.
Faversham CPME13 7JJ04-May-70TR 01185 61480
1240483FORMER FORGE NOW PART OF CURTILAGE OF 64 WEST STREETC18ForgeIIFAVERSHAM FLOOD LANE TR 0161 NW (west side) (F 58) 7/358 Former Forge, now part of curtilage of 64 West Street
Forge. C18. Red brick, part rendered, with plain tiled roof. Single storey, with 4 skylights in roof. Two segmentally headed glazing bar sashes and wooden casement to right and boarded carriage doors to centre left. Within the curti- lage (now, but not formerly) of a listed building, and closely related to the listed Wool Warehouse (10 metres to south) and to the Stonebridge pond with its sequence of listed properties, this building is of importance not only for its unique survival as a forge building in Faversham, but also for its outstanding group value. Interior not inspected
Faversham CPME13 7JJ27-Sep-89TR 01164 61519
1069410THE THREE TUNS INNC17Public HouseIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – The Three Tuns Inn TR 0l6l SW 2/156A II
C17 building refaced with stucco. Steeply pitched hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on 1st floor and in ground floor window to right hand. 2 storeys. 2 windows.
Faversham CPME13 7JL03-Aug-72TR 01156 61352
106941349A AND 49B, TANNERS STREETC19BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 49A and 49B TR 0161 SW 2/290 II GV
Accessible from an alley running west between Nos 48 and 49 Tanners Street. No 49A comprises. an early Cl9 cottage with annexe and outhouses to the west of it. Cottage of 2 storeys; 1 window bay and 1 door. Painted brick front. 2 light casement windows. 4 flush-panelled door with upper 2 panels cut away and glazed; door with gabled hood of corrugated metal on wooden brackets. No 49B comprises a cottage of timber framed construction. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window bay and 1 door. Tiled gabled roof with 1 gabled dormer. Upper floor roughaast; ground floor brick. 4 light oriel bay on brackets on upper floor; 4 light canted bay on ground floor; casement windows.
Nos 46 to 52 (consec form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JL03-Aug-72TR 01127 61379
106941450-52, TANNERS STREETC18BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 50 to 52 (consec) TR 0161 SW 2/161 II GV
Circa 1770. 2 storeys. 6 windows. Red brick. Cornice and parapet. Windows with cambered head linings and glazing bars intact. Doorways with small flat hoods over. Built for officials of the Royal Gunpowder Factory.
Nos 46 to 52 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JL03-Aug-72TR 01138 61393
111549147-49, TANNERS STREETC15BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – Nos 47 to 49 (consec) TR 0161 SW 2/160A II GV
C18 fronts to C17 buildings; no 49 stands apart from the others to the north of a small passage way; timber-framed and probably Cl5. 2 storeys. 2 windows in no 47, 1 in no 48 and 2 in no 49. Tiled roofs. Nos 47 and 48 red brick, no 48 with a weather-boarded gable. Sash windows with glazing bars. 4 flush-panelled doors. No 49 wholly weather-boarded, with casement windows; on ground floor, C19 shop fronts.
Nos 46 to 52 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JL03-Aug-72TR 01139 61370
134386046, TANNERS STREETC17Timber-framed HouseIIC17 timber-framed cottage, formerly part of a timber-framed range extending from nos 43 to 46. The lst floor overhangs on a bressummer. Ground floor painted brick. Above, timber-framing with brick infilling. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Tiled roof. On 1st floor, window with glazing bars to right hand and casement window to left hand. On ground floor, door to left hand and window with shutter in centre. Roof has pentice behind. In very poor condition.
Nos 46 to 52 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JL03-Aug-72TR 01139 61358
106755496 AND 97, WEST STREETC16BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – Nos 96 & 97 TH 0161 SW 2/130 4.5.70. II GV
Similar Cl6 and Cl7 buildings of higher elevation. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. No 96 fronted with wood painted and grooved in imitation of masonry with gable. No 97 painted brick with wooden eaves cornice and 1 dormer. Tiled roofs. Modern shop front to no 97. Glazing bars intact on the 1st floor of No 97 only.
Nos 93 to 98 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JN04-May-70TR 01385 61445
106760394 AND 95, WEST STREETC15BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – Nos 94 & 95 TR 0161 SW 2/129 29.7.50. II GV
1 building. Cl5 timber-framed building, altered in.the C18 but preserving the overhang of its lst floor on bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 1 hipped dormer. Plastered. front. Moulded wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars missing. 2 small bays on the 1st floor, 1 curved window with glazing bars intact on ground floor of No 95.
Nos 93 to 98 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JN29-Jul-50TR 01375 61446
107491224, WEST STREETC17BuildingIIWEST STREET (South Side) No 24
C18 front, to C17 building. Two storeys and attic. One window. One hipped dormer. Plastered front, with traces of pargetting. Moulded and coved wooden eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Small bay on the first floor with modern casement windows in it. Modern shop window.
Nos 24 to 28 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7JN03-Aug-72TR 01386 61429
106941121 AND 22, TANNERS STREETC19BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – Nos 21 & 22 TR 0161 SW 2/288 II GV
Early Cl9. 2 parallel ranges. 2 storeys and cellar. 2 windows. Old tiled hipped roof; central modern brick stack. Painted brick front. 2 light casement windows above. On ground floor, windows 3 panes wide; window in frame in segmental arch to left hand; window in reveals to right hand. Entrance in side.
Nos 2l md 22, Nos 2+ to 27 (consec) form a group with Nos 37 to 42 (consec).
Faversham CPME13 7JP03-Aug-72TR 01136 61326
106941242, TANNERS STREETC18BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 42 TH 0l6l SW 2/159 II GV
C18. 2 storeys. 2 windows, Red brick. Wooden eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in moulded architrave surround with projecting cornice over and 6-panel door.
Nos 21 and 22, Nos 25 to 27 (consec form a group with Nos 37 to 42 (consec).
Faversham CPME13 7JP03-Aug-72TR 01132 61343
111552837-41, TANNERS STREETC16BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – TR 0161 SW 2/158 4.5.70. Nos 37 to 41 (consec) II GV
No 37 forms part of the same block as nos 38 to 41. C18 front to possibly older core. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Tiled gabled roof. Roughcast. Windows with glazing bars. Small shop window and doorway both flanked by pilasters with small fascia over, now converted to domestic use. Window and C19 house door to right hand. Partly C16-17 and partly earlier timber-framed range with plastered fronts and lst floor overhanging on a bressummer. Tiled roofs, no 38 has modern pantiles. Sash windows on ground floor, the glazing bars intact, except in no 39, and one small shop window in no 40 not now used as such. Casement windows above. 2 storeys. 5 windows in all.
Nos 21 and 22, Nos 25 to 27 (consec) form a group with Nos 37 to 42 (consec).
Faversham CPME13 7JP04-May-70TR 01121 61330
111555325-27, TANNERS STREETC19BuildingIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 25 to 27 (consec) TR 0l6l SW 2/289 II GV
Early to mid C19. 2 storeys each. 1 window bay and 1 door each and 1 storey lean-to extension at southern end of no 27. Slate roof with 3 hips above eaves level facing street. No 25 stuccoed; no 26 yellow stock brick; no 27 red brick. Windows 5 panes wide; segmental head to ground floor window in no 26. 4 flush panelled doors with architrave frames; plain friezes and moulded stuccoed cornices over.
Nos 21 and 22, Nos 25 to 27 (consec) form a group with Nos 37 to 42 (consec).
Faversham CPME13 7JP03-Aug-72TR 01125 61311
1067540THE CASTLE INNC15Public HouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – No 76 (The Castle Inn) TR O161 SW 2/126 4.5.70. II
Similar C15 house, but refaced in the Cl8; timber-framing exposed on the lst floor. Parapet. 2 small bays on the ground floor, their glazing bars intact. Casement windows above.
Faversham CPME13 7JQ04-May-70TR 01238 61472
106757646 AND 47, WEST STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 46 & 47 TR 0161 SW 2/120 4.5.70. II
Timber-framed houses, refronted in the Cl8 but preserving the overhang of their 1st floor on a bressummer and brackets. 2 storeys. 3 windows, windows in no 47 have been knocked out and are now boarded over. Plastered front. Hipped tiled roofs. Glazing bars missing in no 46. C19 shop windows.
Faversham CPME13 7JQ04-May-70TR 01267 61446
106760275, WEST STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – No 75 TR 0161 SW 2/125 4.5.70. II
Cl5 timber-framed house with 1st floor jettied on the protruding ends of the floor joists, but refronted and now faced with imitation timbering and cement infilling. Tiled roof. Modern windows and shop window. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Now also forms part of the Castle Inn.
Faversham CPME13 7JQ04-May-70TR 01231 61473
135664978, WEST STREETC17BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – No 78 TR O161 SW 2/127 II
C17 refaced. Early C19. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 dormers. Stuccoed. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact.
Faversham CPME13 7JQ03-Aug-72TR 01248 61469
1343859WHITEFRIARSC18HouseIITANNERS STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 35 & 36 (Whitefriars) TR 0161 SW 2/157 29.7.50. II
Cl8 house, now a Convent. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 hipped dormers. Red brick. Brick stringcourse. Wooden eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof. Wide glazing bars intact. Ground floor windows have segemental heads and formerly had wooden shutters. Good doorway with fluted Doric pilasters, triglyph frieze, pediment, round- headed arch and roundheaded door of 6 fielded panels with 5 small panes of glass arranged fanwise in the head of the door. like a fanlight.
Faversham CPME13 7JW29-Jul-50TR 01078 61272
1067606111, WEST STREETC18BuildingIIWEST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – No 111 TR 0161 SW 2/312 II
Late Cl8 to early C19. 2 paralleles. Tiled roofs. Mathematical tiled front. 3 storeys 2 window bays. Windows with flush boxes; glazing bars and iron guards to 2nd floor windows only; rendered voussoirs to lst floor windows. Modern plate glass shop front on ground floor. East side weather-boarded. Contemporary building also comprising no 111 further north and facing Water Lane. 3 storeys. 4 windows [3 only on 2nd floor]; glazing bars intact; rubbed brick voussoirs; ground floor window with shutters, Roundheaded doorway in 2nd bay from south with stuccoed pilasters, rusticated voussoir, and projecting cornice; 6 panel door with fanlight over.
Faversham CPME13 7JX03-Aug-72TR 01463 61430
111580213 AND 14, PARTRIDGE LANEC18BuildingIIPARTRIDGE LANE 1. – ll03 Nos 13 & 14 TR 0161 SE 3/264 II
Cl8. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window bay each. Tiled gabled roof. 2 flat roofed dormers. Tile-hung 1st floor; red brick ground floor. Windows 3 panes wide. Coupled central doorways flanked by narrow pilasters with flat board hood on small brackets. Single storey annexe to North. Small garden to both houses enclosed by red brick wall.
Faversham CPME13 7JX03-Aug-72TR 01521 61464
1360990JH JOHNSON’S WAREHOUSENATimber-framed houseIIWATER LANE J H Johnson’s Warehouse
Timber-framed building with the 1st floor over-hanging on a bressummer and tile protruding ends of the floor joists. The ground floor has been rebuilt in brick, painted, but the timbering is visible above with painted brick infilling. Tiled roof. Modern windows. 2 storeys. 3 windows.
Faversham CPME13 7JX03-Aug-72TR 01473 61433
106940746, SOUTH ROADC19BuildingIISOUTH ROAD 1. 1103 (North-west Side) – No 46 TR 0l6l SW 2/163 29.7.5O. II
Early Cl9. 2 storeyp. 5 window. Stuccoed. Dentilled eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with engaged Doric columns, pediment, rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels.
Faversham CPME13 7JY29-Jul-50TR 01282 61319
1069471PROVENDER MILLC19MillIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 02/01/2013
BELVEDERE ROAD (West Side) Provender Mill
(Formerly listed as Mill building in Denne’s Depot)
C19. Typical C19 warehouse but listed because it is in a prominent position along Faversham Creek. 4 and a half storeys with lucan in gable end and over quay, 3 bays facing West. Slate roof with 3 gabled dormers facing South, 2 gabled dormers and a lucan facing North. Yellow stock brick front. Band below third floor window and cornice over. segmental headed windows with glazing bars, each bay bounded by flat brick pilasters. Wooden boarded doors, in central bay on lst and ground floors. Lean-to 4 storey annexe faced with corrugated iron to South.
Faversham CPME13 7LD03-Aug-72TR 01649 61713
11162546 AND 7, HUGH PLACEC18HouseIIHUGH PLACE 1. – ll03 Nos 6 & 7 TR 0l6l SE 3/242 II GV
Late Cl8. 2 storeys. in 2 sections: No 6 a dwelling house and No 7 to right hand a warehouse, with slightly higher frontage. Tiled hipped roofs. Red brick fronts. No 6 has 1 2 light casement window above and another at left hard end below. Wooden boarded door in segmental headed frame. No 7 has on each floor a wooden boarded door in centre flanked by windows, 1 to each side on 1st floor and 1 to left hand on ground floor.
Nos 1 to 7 (consec) form a group with east front of No 15 and west front of No 14 Market Place.
Faversham CPME13 7LE03-Aug-72TR 01540 61320
1261087FAVERSHAM CHANDLERYC19ChandleryIIFAVERSHAM TR 0161 NE BELVEDERE ROAD 1/207 Faversham Chandlery II
Chandlery. Early C19 industrial building. Timber framed building faced with weatherboarding (painted to front and left side) with hipped slate roof. 2 storeys, irregular fenestration. 1st floor of main front has 3, 12 pane horizontally sliding sashes and 3 boarded loading doors. Ground floor has 2 early C19 12 pane sashes in moulded architraves to left hand side and 2 paired mid C19 sashes without glazing bars but with horns to right hand side. Early C19 door- case between 2 left side windows with flat wooden hood on carved brackets and boarded door. Above the door just under the eaves is a contemparary clock with a wooden open pediment on brackets protecting it from the elements.
Faversham CPME13 7LL27-Jan-88TR 01616 61663
132034069 AND 71, SOUTH ROADC19BuildingIISOUTH ROAD 1. 1103 (South-east Side) – Nos 69 & 71 TR 0161 SW 2/314 II
Early C19. 2 storeys and attic with basement. 4 windows. Slate gabled roof; 2 flat roofed dormers. White brick front. Windows with frames; outer windows 3 panes wide, inner windows 4 panes wide; painted rubbed brick voussoirs. Ground floor windows originally both with shutters; shutters now missing in No 71. Round-headed doorways; painted voussoirs; 6 flush panelled doors with semi-circular fanlights with tracery over.
Faversham CPME13 7LT03-Aug-72TR 01164 61212
1069408ALMHOUSES (NOS 1 TO 30 AND THE CHAPEL)C19AlmshouseIISOUTH ROAD 1. 1103 (North-west Side) – Almshouses (Nos 1 to 30 & TR 0l6l SW 2/157A The Chapel) II
Gothic building of 1863-4 designed by Messrs Hooker and Wheeler of Brenchley, Kent, and built by G W Chinnock brothers of Southampton. Symmetrical range 470 feet long, with return wings 120 feet long facing Tanners Street and Napleton Street. Red brick, with white bulk bands and stone dressings, tiled roofs. Casement windows. At each end of the main front are 2 low towers containing water tanks. 2 projections With gables between these and the centre. Arcaded ground floor with gabled porches between the main gabled projections. In the centre of the main front is the chapel which is a Decorated stone building which projects. This has 2-light windows with quatrefoils in the spandels; formerly, pointed bell turret on either side of roof.
Faversham CPME13 7LU04-May-70TR 01163 61257
124051056, SOUTH ROADC19Gate House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
659/2/371 SOUTH ROAD 27-SEP-89 (Northwest side) 56 South Lodge
Gate house to gunpowder works: now house. 1851/2. Hammer-dressed ragstone ashlar, rock-faced dressings, stone ridge stack and slate hipped roof.
T-shaped single-depth plan. Italianate style.
EXTERIOR: Single-storey; 1-window range front with plinth, a shallow gable with overhanging eaves extends down to the right over a round-arched, keyed doorway with boarded door; segmental-arched 6/6-pane casement in the gable, with similar to other elevations. Chimney has wide, thin cornice. Later extension to the rear.
HISTORY: The Chart Gunpowder Mills formed part of the Home Works of the Royal Gunpowder Factory, and were rebuilt in 1815.
The gate lodge and associated walls (qv) to the Chart Mills (SAM) were built by the owner, William Hall, as the main entrance to the Mills after all the Faversham works came under his control and were rationalised from 1854. One of the few complete surviving buildings directly associated with the gunpowder works in the centre of Faversham, and a rare instance of the use of stone in the town.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, N° 4, 3rd Ed. 1986; NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME, p.4, 1998) -~
COACH HOUSE AND WALL ABOUT 10 METRES EAST OF ST ANNE’S CROSS PUBLIC HOUSE
Faversham CPME13 7LY27-Sep-89TR 01010 61190
1240511COACH HOUSE AND WALL ABOUT 10 METRES EAST OF ST ANNE’S CROSS PUBLIC HOUSEC19Coach HouseIIFAVERSHAM SOUTH ROAD TR 0161 SW (south east side) (Additional) 2/373 Coach-house and wall about 10 metres east of St Anne’s Cross Public House Interior not inspected GV II
Coach-house and stabling. Circa 1850. Red brick on ground floor and timber framed first floor clad with weather boarding, and slate roof. One storey and loft. Boarded loft door in roadside gable elevation, with boarded carriage doors on-ground floor and boarded segmentally headed window opening. Linked to the public house, to which it was the coach-house, by a partly rebuilt red brick wall about 5 feet in height with a boarded gate adjoining the House.
Faversham CPME13 7LY27-Sep-89TR 01043 61178
1240572GATES, PIERS AND WALLS TO NO 56 (SOUTH LODGE)C19GatesIIThe entry for:
FAVERSHAM SOUTH ROAD TR 0161 SW + 0061 (north-west side) F 9 (part) 2 + 10/370 Gates and piers to Home Mills site and walls attached GV II
Shall be replaced by:
Gates, piers and walls. 1851. Squared, coursed ragstone walls, tooled, rusticated ashlar piers, and cast-iron gates.
PLAN: Piers with walls curving forward extend approx. 20m to left and right.
EXTERIOR: Capped piers and coped walls with secondary piers, the double-leaf gates have anthemion-headed finials and dogbars.
HISTORY: The Chart Gunpowder Mills formed part of the Home Works of the Royal Gunpowder Factory.
The walls and associated gate lodge (56 South Road, qv) to the Chart Mills (SAM) were built by the owner, William Hall, after all the Faversham works came under his control and were rationalised from 1854, and enclosed several pre-existing buildings. Formed the main approach and boundary walls to the mills, and are a instance of the use of stone in the town.
(Percival, A J,’The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, No 4, 3rd ED. 1986;NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME,p.4, 1998)
Faversham CPME13 7LY27-Sep-89TR 01010 61184
1240590ST ANNS CROSS PUBLIC HOUSEC19Public HouseIIFAVERSHAM
659/2/372 SOUTH ROAD 27-SEP-89 (Southeast side) ST ANN’S CROSS PUBLIC HOUSE
Public house, now house. c1850. Stucco with ridge stacks and slate hipped roof.
PLAN: Double-depth plan.
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys and basement; 3-window range. Symmetrical front has rusticated quoins and a raised central section. Steps with cast-iron railings with splat balusters up to a half-glazed double door in a segmental-arched entablature on pilasters. Tripartite ground-floor windows with 2/2-pane sashes in moulded surrounds, first-floor 6/6-pane sashes with small corbels. Small cellar window to right with glazing bars. Paired modillion eaves. Left return has ground-floor sash to the front and wide pub window to the rear. 3-window rear elevation with 6/6-pane sashes. Stacks with moulded cornices.
HISTORY: The nearby Chart Gunpowder Mills formed part of the Home Works. The Mills were rationalised after 1854 when all the Faversham works came under the control of William Hall; the C18 house of the Superintendent of the works bore the same name. The sale by the first recorded licensee was made in 1853.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, No 4, 3rd Ed. 1986; ‘Inns and Taverns of Faversham’, Faversham Papers, No 19).
Faversham CPME13 7NA27-Sep-89TR 01057 61179
1260996KOSICOTC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM
659/10/361 LOWER ROAD 14-DEC-01 KOSICOT
House for gunpowder worker; now house. Mid-C19, extended and altered C20. Brick with brick gable stacks with cornices and a slate roof.
PLAN: T-shaped single-depth plan, extended to rear.
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys; 2-window range front with lattice-pane casements: 2 square bay windows beneath projecting dormers with barge boards and set on curved brackets. Segmental-arched doorway with C20 door to S. N gable has projecting gable stack and a small casement with segmental-arched head to the left; S gable without openings has decorative bargeboards. Late C20 extension to rear wing in matching style.
HISTORY: Occupied by workers at the nearby Chart Gunpowder Mills (SAM), which formed part of the Home Mills.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, No.4, 3rd Ed.1986; NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME, p.4, 1998)
Faversham CPME13 7NB27-Sep-89TR 00866 61194
1240493WHITE HOUSEC17HouseIIFAVERSHAM
659/10/244 LOWER ROAD 27-SEP-89 (South side) WHITE HOUSE
House for gunpowder worker; now house. C17, extended and altered C18. Brick with right-hand brick gable stack and a steep tiled roof.
PLAN: Single-depth one room plan, room added to left of entrance, and extended top rear outshut.
EXTERIOR: 2 storey and attic; 2-window range. Right-hand earlier part in English bond has a plinth and plat band, 20 door and segmental-arched ground-floor window, and similar windows in left-hand gable. Late-C20 glazing. Rear catslide outshut.
HISTORY: Described in 1806 as a millman’s house, it was occupied by workers at the Ospringe Mill, a small C 18 gunpowder mill which formed part of the Home Mills which the government bought in 1759 to create the first Royal Gunpowder Works.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, No 4, 3rd Ed. 1986; Cocroft, W, Dangerous Energy, Chapter 2, p26, draft 1998; NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME, p26, 1998).
Faversham CPME13 7NJ27-Sep-89TR 00440 61140
106943235-39, OSPRINGE STREETC15Timber-framed BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – Nos 35 to 39 (odd) TR 0060 11/173 29.7.50. II GV
Timber-framed building refronted, probably Cl5. The ground floor has been rebuilt in brick, painted. The 1st floor is stuccoed, but it consists of a centre portion and 2 wings which project on a bressummer. A bracket supports the eaves in the recessed centre. Tiled roof. Some casement windows (5 with small square leaded panes), some sash windows (1 with glazing bars intact) and small Cl6 curved shop window with its glazing bars intact in No 39.
Nos 31 to 45 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7NP29-Jul-50TR 00303 60861
106943520 AND 22, OSPRINGE STREETC17BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – – No 20 29.7.50. No 22 TR 0060 11/179 II
Cl7. 2 storeys and attics. 5 windows. 1 hipped dormer. Painted brick. Stringcourse in 2 portions. Tiled roof. Casement windows, those on the lst floor with small square leaded panes. No 20 has an early Cl9 extension built on at South-East end, comprising 2 storey block of 2 window bays. Windows in brick reveals, without glazing bars, Modern shop front and fascia on ground floor Low wide single storey building to East of this comprising former stable block; no windows facing street.
Faversham CPME13 7NP29-Jul-50TR 00326 60879
1343868THE ANCHOR HOTELC19HotelIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 33 (The Anchor Hotel) TR 0060 11/172 II GV
Early C19. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 dormers. Pebble-dash. Parapet. Glazing bar intact on the lst floor. 2 modern bays below. Small porch with Doric columns and projecting cornice. Door of 6 fielded panels. The front of the building formerly had the words “Coach Office” incised on it, as it fronted the main road from London to Canterbury (Watling Street).
Nos 3l to 45 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7NP03-Aug-72TR 00313 60857
134386941 AND 43, OSPRINGE STREETC19HouseIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 41 & 43 TR 0060 11/174 II GV
A pair of early Cl9 houses. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Red brick. Parapet. Glazing bars intact. Doorways in moulded architrave surrounds With projecting cornices over and 4-panel doors.
Nos 31 to 45 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7NP03-Aug-72TR 00290 60863
1240312FAVERSHAM STONEBRIDGE LODGEC18Watch House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
659/2/309 WEST STREET 14-APR-80 FAVERSHAM STONEBRIDGE LODGE
Watch house at gunpowder works; armoury during Napoleonic War; school 1848-61; now house. Late C18, altered C19 and late C20. Rendered brick with two short brick ridge stacks to left end and tiled hipped roof.
PLAN: Single-depth plan.
EXTERIOR: Single storey; 3-window range to road, with a left of centre doorway with boarded door and hornless 8/8-pane sashes; entrance in right return with mid C20 door, the rear has 4 windows and doorway in similar positions to the front, with keystones to the windows, and a blocked doorway to the left.
INTERIOR: Altered late C20. The interior contains a circular painted panel on which is depicted various sabre positions – used as a target probably by the local militia. HISTORY: Described as a watchman’s house in 1806, it formed part of the Lower and Bennet gunpowder mills, which were part of the Home Mills within the Royal Gunpowder Works. It was used as an armoury to defend the Works during the Napoleonic War. Stonebridge Pond to the rear was a system of leats for moving powder around the mill.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its Development’, Faversham Papers, No 4, 3rd Ed. 1986; NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME, p.5, 1998).
Faversham CPME13 7RT14-Apr-80TR 01098 61506
1067599WAREHOUSE (G TWYMAN AND SON LIMITED)C19WarehouseIIWEST STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – Warehouse [G Twyman and Son Limited] TR 0161 SW 2/310 II GV
Cl9. 2 parallel ranges. 4 storeys with brick projection before most of the ground floor and with main entrance on the lst floor. Red brick. Tiled gabled roofs. 7 openings on 3rd floor closed with boarded shutters; segmental relieving arches over. On 1st and 2nd floors 1 segmental headed window in centre and 1 at either end, with pair of wooden boarded doors in segmental arches in 2nd bay from either end; larger doors on 1st floor. Wooden boarded door on ground floor towards east end; steps ascending to lst floor.
Warehouse (Premises occupied by (G Twyman and Son Limited) and No 64 form a group with Nos 1 to 4 (consec) and Nos 6 to 9 (consec) Tanner Street.
Faversham CPME13 7RU03-Aug-72TR 01150 61489
135664764, WEST STREETPre C19Timber-framed houseIIWEST STREET l. 1103 (North Side) – No 64 TR Ol61 SW 2/122 II GV
Timber-framed building, refronted, but with the Ist floor still jettied on the south side. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows facing south, 1 window facing east with gable and attic. South front stuccoed on the ground floor, above weather-boarding. East front painted brick. Glazing bars intact. Early C19 shop window on ground floor in east side. Narrow early C19 addition of high elevation at the west end.
Warehouse (Premises occupied by (G Twyman and Son Limited) and No 64 form a group with Nos 1 to 4 (consec) and Nos 6 to 9 (consec) Tanner Street.
Faversham CPME13 7RU03-Aug-72TR 01169 61475
1240463CORPORATION BOUNDARY STONEC18Boundary StoneIIFAVERSHAM CHART MILLS TR 0061 F 60 10/357 Corporation Boundary Stone GV II
Boundary stone. C18 or early C19. In situ. About 2 feet high and round headed. The main side inscribed T L F (Town and Liberty of Faversham), the short sides with O for Ospringe, D for Davington and F for Faversham, the three parishes meeting here. The last named side also is inscribed XXXIII, which suggests that the stone was also used as a boundary for the Home Mills when in Government hands, since their boundary stones were so marked. Adjacent to or on the scheduled Chart Mills site.
Faversham CPME13 7SD27-Sep-89TR 00970 61234
1240598BOUNDARY STONE TO FORMER CHART GUNPOWDER MILLSC19Boundary StoneIIFAVERSHAM
Boundary stone to gunpowder works. Dated 1839. Limestone. Stone approx.60cm high inscribed WH/1839 on one side and W & PBH on the reverse.
HISTORY: The Chart Gunpowder Mills formed part of the Home Works of the Royal Gunpowder Factory. The Hall family bought them in 1825. Associated with the nearby Chart Mills (SAM), indicating the extent of the works and its presence close to the centre of the town.
(Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, N(4, 3rd Ed. 1986; NMR Report, Home Works, RCHME, p4, 1998)
Faversham CPME13 7SD27-Sep-89TR 01023 61286
1069452STONEBRIDGE COTTAGESC16Timber-framed BuildingIIDAVINGTON HILL 1. – ll03 No 1 (Stonebridge Cottages) TR 0161 NW 7/146 4.5.1O. II GV
Cl6. Timber-framed cottage fronted with weather-boarding, the 1st floor jettied on its East side. Tiled roof. 1 sash window with its glazing bars intact, the others casement windows. 2 storeys. 2 windows.
Nos 1 and Nos 3 to 8 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7SJ04-May-70TR 01045 61580
10694533-8, DAVINGTON HILLC18CottageIIDAVINGTON HILL 1. – ll03 Nos 3 to 8 (consec) TR 0161 NW 7/147 II GV
C18 cottages. 2 storeys. 1 window each. Fronted with weather-boarding. Eaves cornice. Tiled roofs. Glazing bars intact. Doorways in moulded ardiitrave surrouds.
Nos 1 and Nos 3 to 8 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 7SJ03-Aug-72TR 01055 61603
1069426GATEWAY AND WALL ENCLOSING GARDENS OF NOS 9 TO 12 STEPHENS CLOSEC17WallIIOLD GATE ROAD, DAVINGTON 1. – ll03 29.7.50. Gateway enclosing gardens of Nos 9 to 12 Stephens Close (formerly listed under Dark Hill Davington). – Wall enclosing Nos 9 to 12 Stephens Close TR 0061 NE 9/145A II
Red brick wall formerly enclosing garden to Davington Count and now enclosing back gardens of Nos 9 to 12 Stephens Close. The North-west end of this wall has now been demolished. Formerly in the centre of the wall on this side, but now towards its Northern end, is an archway dated 1624. This is an obtusely-pointed arch with chamfered jambs, flanked by obelisk-shaped pilasters, with dripstone, cornice and truncated pediment over. The upper part of the pilasters is of red brick, the arch and lower part of the pilasters are covered with a thin coating of cement. A similar, plainer gateway in wall enclosing garden to No 9. Gateway with similarly shaped arch of stone; truncated brick pediment over. Part of original wall remains in North-east corner of garden to No.9; fine round-headed moulded stone gateway incorporated within it.
Faversham CPME13 7SU29-Jul-50TR 00918 61608
1069470OARE WINDMILLC19WindmillIIOARE ROAD, DAVINGTON 1. 1103 (East Side) – Oare Windmill TM 0062 5/153 29.7.50. II GV
Early C19. Tower type. Red brick. Hooded cap of tarred weather-boarding. Sweeps and fantail missing.
Oare Windmill, Mill Cottage and The Mill House forma group.
Faversham CPME13 7TJ29-Jul-50TR 00928 62540
1260979MILL HOUSEC18HouseIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 09/04/2014
FAVERSHAM, OARE ROAD (north east side) Mill House
House. Circa 1800. Painted brick with late C20 concrete interlocking tiled roofs. Two parallel main ranges with single storey and attic wing to rear. Two storeys and basement on plinth with stacks at end left and at end right. Regular fenestration of two late C20 wooden casements on each floor with basement opening to left. Central door of 6 panels, the top two glazed, with semi-circular traceried fanlight and pilastered doorcase with open pediment. The rear wings, also with casement windows, with more steeply pitched roofs may be earlier in origin. This was the mill house associated with the nearby mill, built c.1861, and its predecessor burnt in that year. Although re-roofed and refenestrated, the structure and openings remain unaltered. Interior not inspected. Included for group value with Oare Windmill. Windmill, Mill Cottage and The Mill House form a group
Faversham CPME13 7TJ27-Sep-89TR 00884 62530
1240464HAM FARMHOUSE AND WALLS ATTACHEDC18FarmhouseIIFAVERSHAM THE HAM TR 0162 F 106 (6/238) (local list) Ham Farmhouse and walls attached Interior inspected GV II
House. Early C18 and extended early C19. Painted brick and plain tiled roofs. Two cell plan in origin, extended by one bay to right and now with hipped L-shaped wing added to rear. Two storeys on plinth with parapet to hipped roof with central stack. Three late C20 centre hung casements on each floor and half-glazed door to centre left. Lean-to addition to left, with blocked openings in return elevation. Metal casements to rear. Interior: brick lined cellars to original portion; chamfered cross beams of C18 character. The lean- to was used as the pay office for the brickfield workers in this area C19. Projecting from the main, northern, elevation are painted brick walls about four feet in height and buttressed to the roadside and extending some 30 metres at left and at right to abut the wall of a partly demolished and probably later C19 farm building. Ham farm represents the detached marsh pasture of Copton Manor (listed) in Preston several miles to the south.
Faversham CPME13 7TS27-Sep-89TR 01883 62742
1260995PAIR OF HOUSES AT TR 021 627C19HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE HAM TR 06 SW F104 4/239 (local list) Pair of houses at TR 021 627 Interior inspected II
House pair. Circa 1870s. Massed concrete. Semi-detached pair. Two storeys with cornice to flat roof and central stack. Regular fenestration of four glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with panelled door to right and blocked doorway to left. Single storey service wings to rear with glazing bar sashes and boarded doors. Interior with good cast iron fire- places with moulded and enriched Neo-Classical style surrounds; simple moulded details elsewhere. The sash windows are of good quality finish and moulded design. An unusually early example of flat roofed, concrete construction in small domestic buildings. Possibly originally built as Coastguard cottages, and certainly mapped by the 1890s Ordnance Survey.
Faversham CPME13 7TS27-Sep-89TR 02123 62656
1261008BARN ABOUT 30 METRES NORTH OF HAM FARMHOUSEC17BarnIIFAVERSHAM THE HAM TR 0162 F 107 6/359 Barn about 30 metres north of Ham Farmhouse Interior Inspected GV II
Barn. C17 or earlier. Timber framed and clad with weather boarding with some painted brick and breeze block to end walls and corrugated asbestos roof. Half-hipped roof, and cart doors in left end elevation. Interior: 5 bays with aisles, with timbers throughout of irregular finish and relatively slight scant- ling, but with mixed straight and arched bracing, and with straight passing shores to main posts. Renewed clasped purlin roof.
Faversham CPME13 7TS27-Sep-89TR 01822 62765
1240465THE SHIPWRIGHTS ARMS PUBLIC HOUSEC18Public HouseIIFAVERSHAM HOLLOWSHORE TR 06 SW F 108 4/240 (local list) The Shipwrights Arms, public house Interior Inspected II
Public house. C18 or earlier, altered and extended early C19 and late C19. Timber framed and weather boarded and part clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roofs. Two parallel ranges with additional wing to east. Two storeys with hipped roof with stacks to rear centre and to right, with two wooden case- ments on first floor and 3 irregularly placed wooden and metal casements on ground floor and central doubled half-glazed doors. Left hand extension of 2 storeys with stack at end right and with metal casement on ground floor, and with single storey extension to left return with casements with picture window over. Rear elevation also 2 storeys, hipped, with wooden casements on first floor and single storey extension on ground floor with casements and boarded door, Interior: clearly shows the two main periods of building, the rear range the older, with exposed brick fireplaces. The building stands far out on the marshes at the confluence of the Faversham and Oare Creeks (Hollowshore) and thus has a landscape value above what might be expected for a relatively modest building; it also still serves the boat repair and mooring activities on Hollowshore it was first built to meet.
Faversham CPME13 7TU27-Sep-89TR 01754 63612
1389579EAST CRYSTALLISING HOUSE (BUILDING 11) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREAC18Crystallising house (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Crystallising house at saltpetre refinery, part of gunpowder works, now store. 1789. Timber framed, clad with weatherboard, with corrugated iron hipped roof.
PLAN: Long narrow plan.
EXTERIOR: Single storey, now open to NE side (morticing for former louvres clearly visible), 12 bays long with strutted timber posts, covered to the ends and rear with louvred openings and a central doorway.
INTERIOR: Strutted king posts ties, corner ties, and matchboard lining to roof.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of the British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery which was built 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The crystallising house was where saltpetre was crystallised out of the solution which had been treated in the nearby refining house (qv), by placing it in racks of vats to cool, hence the open structure. It is the best preserved building on this historically important site, and survives as a particularly impressive example of a late C18 industrial building through the close relationship between the structure and the process. It forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18-early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
WEST CRYSTALLISING HOUSE (BUILDING 18) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREA
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01336 62739
1389580WEST CRYSTALLISING HOUSE (BUILDING 18) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREAC18Crystallising house (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Crystallising house at saltpetre refinery, part of gunpowder works, now store.1800-10. Timber framed, clad with weatherboard, the SE and SW walls filled with brick nogging, with slate hipped roof.
PLAN: Rectangular single-cell plan.
EXTERIOR: Single storey, with double doors in SW end and NW side, 3 tall 5/5-pane casements each side and 1 in the end.
INTERIOR: 3 king post trusses, the outer ones with ties to end walls, and stone flagged floor.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of the British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The crystallising house was where saltpetre was crystallised out of the solution which had been treated in the nearby refining house (qv), by placing it in racks of vats to cool, hence the open structure. This is one of two original refinery buildings on this site, and is a particularly impressive through the close relationship between the structure and the process, and is little altered. It forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18-early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
REFINING HOUSE (BUILDING 19) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01302 62758
1389581REFINING HOUSE (BUILDING 19) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKSC18Refining House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Refining house at saltpetre refinery, part of gunpowder works, now store. 1789. Yellow brick with corrugated iron hipped roof.
PLAN: Rectangular single-cell plan.
EXTERIOR: Single storey, originally with flat heads each side, the SE front now with central inserted vehicle entry, blocked right-hand doorway; blocked doorways in each end.
INTERIOR: Timber trusses.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The refining house was where saltpetre was treated to improve its consistency and quality, and is one of the two original refinery buildings on the site. It forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18-early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country and comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
MELTING HOUSE (BUILDING 20) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREA
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01340 62687
1389582MELTING HOUSE (BUILDING 20) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREAC18Melting House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Melting house at saltpetre refinery, part of gunpowder works, now store. 1800-10. Red brick with corrugated iron hipped roof.
PLAN: Rectangular single-cell plan.
EXTERIOR: Single storey, a wide full-height opening to the SE with a louvered light to the right, rear has two cast-iron windows; two buttresses to the NE end.
INTERIOR: 2 king post trusses with ties to end walls and diagonal struts; corner ties.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The melting house was where saltpetre was boiled in solution before being taken to the adjoining refining and crystallising house (qqv). It forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18-early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country and comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
EARTH HOUSE (BUILDING 5) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREA
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01293 62773
1389583EARTH HOUSE (BUILDING 5) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS, WORKSHOP AREAC18Earth House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Earth house at saltpetre refinery, part of gunpowder works, now workshop and store. 1800-10. Yellow brick with corrugated hipped roof.
PLAN: Rectangular single-cell plan with central dividing wall.
EXTERIOR: Single storey, formerly with nine openings to each side with rubbed brick flat heads, mostly blocked or altered on the SW side. NE side has original 8/8-pane hornless sashes, two flanking a doorway in the E end, two more closely-spaced wither side of a near-central doorway, and two taller windows to the E end flanking another doorway. Inserted vehicle entrance to NW end.
INTERIOR: Five king post trusses with pairs of ties to end walls and diagonal struts, corner ties, the roof lined with matchboard.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of the British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
Earth houses stored unrefined saltpetre, imported from the East Indies, previous to treatment in the refinery complex (qv), and this is the earliest and last surviving of six which were built here in the early C19. The relatively elaborate fenestration suggests that it may have also have been intended for or very soon adapted to other purposes. This building forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18 – early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country and comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67).
OFFICE, STORES AND HOUSE (BUILDING 10) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKS
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01318 62775
1389584OFFICE, STORES AND HOUSE (BUILDING 10) AT FORMER MARSH GUNPOWDER WORKSC1Pump House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Office, store, house and pump house at saltpetre refinery within gunpowder works, partly disused. 1810-15. Yellow Flemish bond brick with brick stacks and tiled hipped roof.
PLAN: Double-depth plan house attached at NW end of office and store, with small pyramid-roof pump house at the opposite end.
EXTERIOR: 2 storey; 3-window house has a central round-arched doorway with panelled door, keyed, flat-headed windows with mid C20 glazing, the upper ones in half dormers. 2 stacks with cornices to ridge and end hip. Similar rear has 2 dormers and flat-headed doorway. Main store and office range a single storey with 4 openings each side, the SW side has 3 windows and a doorway between the end two, the NE side has 2 windows with a door between and a large central carriage entrance. Pump house narrower, 5 storeys; 1-window elevation to E and W with 3/6-pane sashes, and a doorway from the NE side beside a small lean-to. Steep roofs with corbelled eaves.
INTERIOR: Reported to have softwood roof, the central part divided between the office and store.
HISTORY: The Marsh works were part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory which was established outside Faversham in 1786 after an explosion in the town, to remove some of the more dangerous processes. They played an important part in the improvement of British gunpowder leading up to and during the Napoleonic Wars, under William Congreve. The saltpetre refinery was built in 1789 as part of Congreve’s successful drive to improve the ingredients of British powder. It was privatised after the war, and closed in the 1920s.
The offices, stores and accommodation were the final part of the refurbishment of the refinery under Government control, and formed an important part of the operation of the works. It forms part of a discrete, coherent group of late C18-early C19 industrial buildings for refining saltpetre, the best preserved of this type in the country and comparable with French and Swedish examples.
(Wayne Cocroft, Dangerous Energy. The archaeology of gunpowder and military explosives manufacture. Swindon (English Heritage), 2000, pp. 54-67)
PROOF HOUSE APPROXIMATELY 10 METRES SOUTH SOUTH WEST OF GATE HOUSE, MARSH WORKS
Faversham CPME13 7TY14-Dec-01TR 01317 62734
1069425GROVE COTTAGEC18CottageIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 12/09/2014
FAVERSHAM, WESTERN LINK, Grove Cottage
(Formerly listed as Nos 1 & 2 (Grove Cottages) , OARE ROAD (West Side), DAVINGTON)
Pair of cottages on gunpowder works, now one house. Early/mid C18, altered late C19. Brick footings, weatherboarded timber frame above, central ridge stack and tiled half-hipped roof.
PLAN: Single-depth plan with rear outshut.
EXTERIOR: 2 storey – 4 window range, formerly each house of 2 windows, with central doorway, now only right-hand survives; 6/6-pane casements, with 4/4-pane casements in 4 hipped dormers.
INTERIOR: Altered 1990s.
HISTORY: The Oare Gunpowder Works was working from the C18 and underwent continuous development until 1936 when it closed. It included three houses at the NE end occupied by staff of the Works, which are the only surviving standing remains of the C18 Works.
(Cocroft, W, ‘Oare Gunpowder Works’, Faversham Papers in association with RCHME, N° 39, p28, 1994; Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, N° 4 3rd Ed. 1986)
Oare CPME13 7UA03-Aug-72TR 00577 62703
1389587GROVE HOUSE AND GARAGE TO SOUTHC18House (Gunpowder Works)IIFAVERSHAM
Superintendent’s house on gunpowder works, now house. Early C18, re-fronted in early C19. Brick with stuccoed front and a steep tiled hipped roof, with ridge stacks.
PLAN: Double-depth plan
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys and attic; 3-window range. Symmetrical front with coved eaves, early C19 door surround with incised pilasters to a moulded entablature and a 6-panel door, the top pair glazed; hornless 8/8-pane sashes each side with C19 ground-floor drip moulds, and a late C20 window set in the recess above the entrance. 2 hipped dormers have mid C20 casements. Window-less sides. Outbuilding, now garage, to south is a single-storey C18 structure of English bond brick with corrugated asbestos roof. Segmental arches over two blocked openings to former wheel pit facing the house.
HISTORY: The Oare Gunpowder Works was working from 1719 and underwent continued development until 1936 when it closed. It included three houses at the NE end occupied by staff of the Works, which are the only surviving standing remains of the Works. The remains of an incorporating mill are included in the garage to the S. The house was used as an officers’ mess during the Second World War.
(Cocroft, W, ‘Oare Gunpowder Works’, Faversham Papers in association with RCHME,No. 39, p. 28, 1994; Percival, A J, ‘The Faversham Gunpowder Industry and its development’, Faversham Papers, No. 4, 3rd Ed. 1986)
The asset was previously listed twice also under List entry 1205770. This entry was removed from the List on 12 June 2014.
Faversham CPME13 7UA29-Jul-50TR 00614 62649
10694555, EAST STREETC18BuildingIIEAST STREET 1. – ll03 No 5 TR 0161 SE 3/41 29.7.50. II GV
Previously Nos 1 & 2 County Villas were wrongly included With No 5 but are not listable. Large C18 house. 3 storeys, 5 windows. Brown brick with red brick window dressings, stringcourse and pilasters flanking the front. The pilasters stand on high bases and rise to the lst floor, where the capitals are continued across the front in the form of a stringcourse. Above this rusticated pilasters flank the top storey. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. Large C20 plate-glass shop front with stone rubble casing and deep boarded fascia; inimical to style of original building above.
Nos 2 to 5 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AD29-Jul-50TR 01662 61324
106945616, EAST STREETPre C18Timber-framed BuildingIIEAST STREET 1. – ll03 (North Side) No 16 TR 0161 SE 3/42 II GV
Timber-framed building refronted in the C18 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressumer. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 dormers. 1 once loft door with a hoist. Stuccoed. Parapet. Tiled root, 1 sash window with glazing bars intact. Other windows modern.
Nos 15 to 19 (consec) and Cooksditch form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AE03-Aug-72TR 01729 61315
106940389 AND 90, PRESTON STREETC17Timber-framed BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 89 & 90 TR 0161 SE 3/67 II GV
Cl8 fronts to a C17 timber-framed core. 3 storeys. 2 windows. No 89 projects forward; 1st and 2nd floors overhang. Stuccoed. Parapet. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. Modern shop fronts.
Nos 88 to 90 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AF03-Aug-72TR 01612 61305
10694542, 3 AND 3A, EAST STREETC15Timber-framed BuildingIIEAST STREET 1. – 1103 Nos 2 & 3 TR 0161 SE 3/40 No 3A (formerly listed as No 4) 4.5.70. II GV
One building. C15 timber-framed building, refronted with stucco in the Cl8 but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor in the front; the back wing now painted brick on the ground floor and plaster above with traces of a bressumer between but the ground floor underbuilt. Tiled roof. Modern shop front and modern casement windows. Nos 2 and 3, 2 storeys and 2 windows. No 3A, 3 storeys and 2 windows with half-hipped gable.
Nos 2 to 5 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AF04-May-70TR 01641 61323
111561688, PRESTON STREETC17BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 88 TR 0161 SE 3/280 II GV
Building with C17 or earlier core. Tiled gabled roof. lst floor overhangs; boarded. Ground floor facing street has modern plate glass shop window and doorway.
Nos 88 to 9O (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AF03-Aug-72TR 01611 61299
111624855 AND 55A, EAST STREETC18CottageIIEAST STREET 1. llO3 (South Side) – 4.5.70. No 55 – No 55A TR 0161 SE 3/44 II
Cl8 cottage. 2 storeys. 1 window. Painted brick. Dentilled eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Small bay window on both floors. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with pilasters, projecting cornice, low rectangular fanlight and door of 6 panels, the top 2 panels cut away and glazed, the centre 2 fielded. East side weather-boarded.
Faversham CPME13 8AF04-May-70TR 01650 61304
13438394, EAST STREETC18HouseIIEAST STREET 1. – 1103 No 4 TR 0161 SE 3/40 II GV
House presently listed as No 4 comprises late C18 extension to No 3A. 2 storeys. I window [with glazing bars]. 1st floor faced with horizontal boarding cut to resemble masonry. Ground floor includes part of older building. Late C19 shop front. East side weather- boarded.
Nos 2 to 5 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AF03-Aug-72TR 01650 61322
1069457COOKSDITCHC18BuildingII*EAST STREET 1. llO3 (North Side) – Cooksditch TR 0161 SE 3/43 29.7.50. II* GV
Previously Nos 1 and 2 County Villas were wrongly included with this building but are not listable. Large Cl8 house consisting of acentve portion [1774 to 90j and 2 projecting wings [1790-98 Documented]. Fronted with white brick, the sides red brick, The centre portion has 3 storeys and 3 windows. Cornice and parapet. Hipped slate roof. Porch with Ionic columns and dentilled cornice, Round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight. Tile wings are single-storey pavilions with cornice and pediment over. Beneath the cornice each has a depressed brick arch and below this a large 3-light window, the outer lights flanked by Ionic pilasters, the centre 1 by engaged Ionic co1umns, with dentilled cornice over and stone rectangular panel in the tympanum of the brick arch. The east and west sides of these wings are apisidel-ended. Glazing bars intact in the whole house. C19 wing added behind the east wing.
Nos 15 to 19 (consec) and Cooksditch form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AN29-Jul-50TR 01772 61320
134384017-19, EAST STREETC19BuildingIIEAST STREET 1. ll03 (North Side) – Nos 17 to 19 (consec) TR 0161 SE 3/42A II GV
Early C19. 2 storeys. 6 windows. Red brick. Slate roofs. Casement windows.
Nos 15 to 19 (consec0 and Cooksditch form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8AN03-Aug-72TR 01743 61314
1376267FLINT HOUSEC19Flint HouseII659/3/10012 Flint House
Originally a school, derelict at time of survey. Mid C19 former school building in Gothic style, at one time a grammar school for boys and known as William Gibb School. Architect not known at time of survey but similar in style to the former National School adjoining by R C Hussey of 1852. Built of flint with stone dressings and slate roof with some stock brick to rear. The rear later C19 and early C20 red brick extensions are not of special interest. Asymmetrical building ranging between one and three storeys with irregular fenestration and incorporating hall projecting to rear. Right side bay of one storey with crenellated parapet, paired cinquefoil-headed light and arched doorcase with double cinquefoil-headed fanlight. Plinth. Adjoining to left is projecting gable of hall with diamond-shaped quatrefoil to gable and two cinquefoil-headed lights below, flanked by buttresses. To the left is a section with gabled semi-dormer and two ground floor double cinquefoil-headed windows. To the extreme left is a three storey gabled tower with one paired cinquefoil-headed window to each floor. Right side elevation has two gables with original windows and flat arched doorcase. Left side elevation has right side cinquefoil-headed light to all floors, then recessed bay with arched doorcase with traceried fanlight and double cinquefoil-headed light above, followed by projecting bay with ground floor triple window with cinquefoil-headed light. Return has external flint and stone chimneystack but part of the rear elevation is finished in stock brick. Left side of rear elevation has projecting hall with gable with kneelers, diagonal buttresses, diamond-shaped window to gable and arched windows below and three bays of triple mullioned windows to side. Interior has hall with timber roof tie beams and curved braces supported on stone corbels and marble fireplace to adjoining room.
Faversham CPME13 8AW02-Sep-98TR 01838 61418
1343853CHURCH OF ENGLAND JUNIOR SCHOOLC19ChurchIICHURCH ROAD – 1. 1103 Church of England Junior School TR 0161 SE 5/221 II
Built in 1852 as the faversham National School. R C Hussey, architect. High gatehouse in the middle of a 2-storey range which has a single storey cross wing of similar height at either end. Perpendicular style. Knapped flint with stone dressings. Gatehouse has moulded 4 centred stone arch with stone vaulted passageway leading into irregular quadrangle with class rooms on all sides. 3 bays in 2-storey range to either sides of gatehouse. Two 2-light casement windows with cusped heads in flat arches; moulded strings rising to form dripstones over upper windows; crenellated parapet.
Faversham CPME13 8AZ03-Aug-72TR 01783 61399
1240313CHURCH OF ST SAVIOURC19ChurchIIEAST STREET St Saviour’s Church TRO 6SW 4/284
Built in 1885. A prefabricated tin church of elaborate design built as one of 2 mission churches under the auspices of the Parish Church of St Mary of Charity. Cruciform plan 4 bay nave with trefoliated lancets. Transepts of lower elevation. Floor has elaborate cresting and finiale. Bellcote with spire and trefoliated arches to west end. Bargeboards to gable ends. South gabled porch with cresting and bargeboard. Included as an unusually elaborate and complete survival of the type.
Faversham CPME13 8BD28-Jan-83TR 02008 61234
1240314WATER TOWERC18TowerIISTATION ROAD (Faversham Station) Water Tower TR 0160 SP/748 II 0/748
Railway Water Tower. C1858 for the London, Chatham and Dover Railway, probably by their engineer Crampton. Classical style rectangular structure of 2 storeys, 3 windows built of stock brick with red dressings, riveted iron water tank above and iron framed windows. Road elevation has 1st floor blank round-headed openings in arcading and 3 ground floor round headed openings with fixed iron glazing, all with rubbed red brick arches. Rear elevation similar but entirely of blank arcading. Left side round headed doorcase with fanlight and blank above. Moulded brick eaves cornice. Above is riveted iron water tank reached by fixed iron ladder. Included for rarity of survival of railway water towers.
Faversham CPME13 8DT21-May-86TR 01681 60905
1240315FAVERSHAM RAILWAY STATIONC19Railway StationIISTATION ROAD Faversham Railway Station TR 05 NW 4/321 II
Railway station. c.1858. Down side is of yellow brick with red brick dressings. Hipped slate roof. One storey. Central section has 6 round-headed sashes with vertical glazing bars only and horns. End pilasters. Red brick voussoirs and impost blocks. Central round-headed doorcase with fanlight in pedimented surround. Plinth. Wooden canopy supported on iron brackets with scroll pattern. To east is one storey building of lower elevation with one cambered arched casement window and one cambered arched. To west is one storey portion also of lower elevation in yellow brick with hipped slate roof, red brick cornice and 4 cambered casements. Interior of Booking Hall retains original carved wooden ticket office with wooden pilasters, glazed continuous fanlight at top and 3 tiers of wooden square framing with vertical plank- ing behind plinth. Upside is also of c.1858. Yellow brick with redbrick dressings and hipped slate roof. Pilasters. 6 round-headed windows having vertical glazing bars only with red brick arches and round-headed doorcase with pedimented hood. End brick chimneystacks. The two buildings are linked by 2 contemporary white glazed tiled underpasses. 2 centre platforms with identical platform buildings. Each has 3 one storey partitions built of yellow brick with red brick dressings connected by very long wooden jettied canopy supported by iron girders and brackets with scrollwork design and 8 cast iron columns. Pavilions nearest underpass have 3 cambered tripartite windows (one on the downside platform converted into a door) and 3 cambered sashes and cambered headed doorcase with cambered fanlight and 4 panelled door, the top two panels glazed. Central pavilion similar with 7 cambered casements. End pavilion has 6 cambered casements. Each platform has square wooden ticket booth and iron spear railings to underpass with circle patterns near base. Built for the East Kent Railway line.
Faversham CPME13 8DT18-Dec-86TR 01623 60902
1240316CARRIAGE SHED AT FAVERSHAM STATIONC19Carriage ShedIICarriage Shed at Faversham Station TR 05 NW 4/323 II GV
Carriage shed. c.1858. Built of stock brick with red brick dressings, rear elevation faced with render incised to imitiate masonry. Roof now covered with asbestos sheeting. Long one storeyed building with gable split in centre to form roof in 2 parallel ranges. North side has projecting brick pilasters and round-headed arches. Attached to right-hand side is one-storey office building, also of brick with slate roof and 3 brick chimney stacks. 9 round-headed fixed casements and 3-light bay at end with round headed windows and round-headed doorcase. 3 light canted bay with round-headed windows to side of this. South side is rendered and has 12 round-headed casements and later lean-to. West side has 2 casements with 30 panes and 2 red brick pilasters. East side has flat opening to take carriages. Built for the East Kent Railway line.
Faversham CPME13 8EB18-Dec-86TR 01539 60942
1261086FORMER GOODS SHED TO FAVERSHAM STATIONC19Goods ShedIIFAVERSHAM
659/4/324 WHITSTABLE ROAD (OFF) 18-DEC-86 FAVERSHAM FORMER GOODS SHED TO FAVERSHAM STATION
Former goods shed. Circa 1858, built for the East Kent Railway line. Built of stock brick with red brick dressings. Gabled slate roof. PLAN: Rectangular structure of nine bays with smaller structures to north and south, the south structure probably originally a boiler house. EXTERIOR: The front or west elevation has 7 round-headed windows with red brick arches divided by pilasters and two large round-headed openings retaining iron pintle hinges. The windows retain the iron glazing bars of the fixed casements although the glass was missing at the time of the inspection. Plinth. The full length wooden canopy was no longer present. The gable ends have brick coping and circular louvred ventilation holes and large round-headed entrances. A chimneystack on the ridge has been rebuilt. Attached to the south is a low gabled room with round-headed openings including an entrance with a flight of stone steps and solid brick balustrading. A similar but larger projection to the north, probably originally a boiler house, has two paired round-headed arches, similar coping to the gable and round-headed windows and entrance. The east side is similar with round-headed window openings but the casements have gone and there are no entrances INTERIOR: Of nine bays with roof structure of queenposts and side angled queenstruts, two tiers of purlins and a ridgepiece which is boarded. The roof structure is supported on stepped brick lintels. A brick platform stretches halfway across the building to the west and the full length of the building and retains two fixed iron cranes, about 10 feet in height. The end gables each have a louvred oculus and a large round-headed opening for rolling stock. One half of a pair of round-headed doors, ledged and braced, remained within.
A circa 1858 former goods shed built for the East Kent Railway line, substantially intact and part of a good group of railway structures of similar age at Faversham.
Faversham CPME13 8GD18-Dec-86TR 02163 60969
1261085ENGINE SHED AT FAVERSHAM STATIONC19Engine HouseIIEngine Shed at Faversham Station TR 05 NW 4/322 II GV
Railway engine shed. c.1858. Built of stock brick with red brick dressings and slate roof. Plain classical style, one storey, 9 windows. Sides have red brick saw tooth cornices and the sides are divided into panels each containing a round- headed window with 26 fixed metal panes with round-headed red brick arch. Gable end has oculus and stylized tumbling in left side round-headed window and right side full height round-headed double doors. Built for the East Kent Railway line.
Faversham CPME13 8GE18-Dec-86TR 02058 60765
1240605BOUNDARY STONE 50 METRES NORTH WEST OF GARDENER’S LODGEC18Boundary StoneIIThe following building shall be added to the list:- RECREATION GROUND TR 05 NW Boundary Stone 4/10004 50m NW of Gardener’s Lodge GV II
Boundary stone. Mid C18. Stone with curved top of which only about one foot is visible above ground level. Initials T and L (for Town and Liberty) and probably the initial F (for Faversham) is buried beneath the soil. Other side has the initial M. Similar to boundary stone at Chart Mills.
Faversham CPME13 8HA22-Mar-94TR 02026 60961
1240641GARDENER’S LODGEC19LodgeII659/4/10003 Gardener’s Lodge
21.10.94 II
Gardener’s lodge with covered arcade. Built in 1860 by Benjamin Adkins in Picturesque Gothic style. Built of yellow brick with red brick dressings on ground floor and tile hung above. Tiled roof with stock brick chimneystacks. T-shaped building with 3 gables, having elaborate carved bargeboards. South gable has iron weathervane with Town Arms, mullioned and transomed oriel window supported on brackets and arched entrance below. Attached at ground floor level is an ingenious covered arcade to shelter the public. This has polychrome brickwork to the rear and side walls, half hipped tiled roof and is supported on 4 wooden piers each side. Rear elevation of lodge has casement windows. A most unusual combination of lodge with covered arcade.
Faversham CPME13 8HA17-Jun-99TR 02038 60906
1069442DELBRIDGE HOUSEC18HouseIIThe Constitutional Club. Large Cl8 house. 3 storeys. 5 windows. Red brink. 2 cemented stringncourses above ground floor. Similar cornice and parapet. Glazing barn intact. Ground floor windows round-headed and recessed in aroading. Porch with twin wooden Doric columns up 3 stops. Coved recess and round-headed doorway with semi-circular fan- light and door of 6 fielded panels. The West front of the house has 2 projecting wings with brink cornice and parapet and lunette windows on the 2nd floor. Modern lower addition joiniing them.
No 53 and Nos 55 to 59 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ29-Jul-50TR 01474 60956
1069443ST MARY’S VICARAGEC19HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. llO3 (West Side – No 56 (St Mary’s Vicarage) TR 0161 SE 3/56 TR 0160 12/56 29.7.50. II GV
Early C19. 2 storeys, attic and semi-basement. 5 windows. 3 round- headed dormers. Red brick. Wide wooden cornice. Brick parapet. Mansarded slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Ground floor windows round-headed. Centre lst floor window in recessed panel with 4 centre head. Handsome recessed rusticated doorway with keystone over, panelled reveals, semi-circular fanlight and door of 8 moulded panels. Passage way and flight of steps at North end lead to contemporary extension of 2 storeys with 1 window and 1 flush panelled door with doorcase on ground floor.
No 53 and No 55 to 59 (consec form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ29-Jul-50TR 01498 61000
1115652CHASE HOUSEC18HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 55 & 55A (Chase House) TR Ol61 12/55 29.7.50. II GV
C18. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 dormers. Red brick. Cornice and parapet. 2 curved bays, each containing a 3-light window, on ground and 1st floors, of which the ground floor in the South bay has been cut away to form a shop front. Glazing bars intact except for this. Wide door- way with engaged Doric columns, triglyph frieze, projecting cornice, coved recess, semi-circular fan-light and door of 6 moulded panels.
No 53 and No 55 to 59 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ29-Jul-50TR 01491 60984
1240307RAILWAY HOTELC19HotelIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 41 (Railway Hotel TR 0160 12/51 II
The north half only. Early Cl9. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 hipped dormers. Painted brick. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Ground floor windows have cambered head linings. The south half of the Hotel is a separate red brick Cl9 structure.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ03-Aug-72TR 01517 60987
1240508FORMER GEORGE INN WITH ATTACHED OUTBUILDINGSC18Former InnIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (west side) (F 68) 12/368 Former George Inn with attached outbuildings Interior not inspected GV II
House, sometime public house. Early C18 or earlier, refronted mid-late C19. Rendered, with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement on plinth with moulded plat band and cornice to roof with kneelered gables and stacks at end right and at end left. Three sashes on first floor and mullioned and transomed windows of 12 and 6 panes on ground floor both with fluted flanking pilasters, with basement opening to left. Doubled half-glazed doors to centre right with frosted and engraved ‘pub’ glazing. Rendered return and rear elevations. Attached to rear left a single storey range of outbuildings with slate roof. Interior: chamfered ceiling beams and large fireplaces visible. This building adjoins already listed items to the north (items 4/321 and 12/54) and to the south (items 12/53, 12/53A and 12/53B), is part of an interesting group, and besides its age is important since it preserves intact a mid-late C19 ‘pub’ front.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ27-Sep-89TR 01468 60917
1343836WALL AND GATE PIERS ENCLOSING GARDEN TO WEST OF DELBRIDGE HOUSE ON ITS NORTH SIDEC18WallIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Wall and gate piers enclosing garden to West of Delbridge House on its North Side TR 0l6O 12/54A II
C18, Wall of red brick with red brick coping. Red brick panelled gate piers with rendered capping and ball finials.
Faversham CPME13 8JJ03-Aug-72TR 01458 60970
1240309WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN TO NO 49 (MALL HOUSE) ON ITS EAST SIDEC18WallIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Wall enclosing garden to No 49 (Mall House) on it’s East Side TR 0160 12/52A II GV
C18 to C19. Red brick wall; partly red brick and grey headers alternately. Brick capping. Extends as far South as No 3 The Mall. Includes about a 3rd of the way along its length a pair of double wooden boarded doors flanked by a pair of brick gate piers with stone capping.
Nos 49 (Mall House) No 5O (Wreights House) Stables to Wreights House and Walls form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8JL03-Aug-72TR 01442 60853
124046627, THE MALLC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) F 81 12/362 No 27 Interior not inspected GV II
House. Mid C19. Rendered. Two storeys with quoins to cornice and parapet and stacks to rear. Two glazing bar sashes on first in moulded surrounds and canted bay to left on ground floor with tented/roof and plate glass sashes. Panelled door to right in fine moulded doorcase with cornice hood on moulded brackets. Included for group value.
Faversham CPME13 8JL27-Sep-89TR 01427 60774
124049529, THE MALLC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) F 82 12/363 No 29 Interior not inspected1 GV II
House, now offices. First phase pre 1840, altered mid C19. Red brick with rendered details and slate roof. Three storeys with string course to first floor and heavy moulded cornice to second floor and with parapet to hipped roof with stack to rear left. Two half sized glazing bar sashes on second floor in moulded surrounds, and two full sized glazing bar sashes on first floor in moulded surrounds with bracketed cornices. Canted bay to right on ground floor with glazing bar sashes and cornice. Half-glazed and panelled-door moulded semi-circular headed and keyed surround. The right return elevation, with just a single glazing bar sash on second floor and glazed doors on ground floor shows much variation in brickwork suggesting rebuilding in part of a structure marked on the 1841 Tithe Map, including the bonding in of a new facade.
Faversham CPME13 8JL27-Sep-89TR 01426 60768
124050743-45, THE MALLC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) (F 74 & 75) 12/367 Nos 43-45 Interior not inspected GV II
House pair. Dated 1846. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Unusual Tudor lodge style semi-detached pair. Two storeys and basement with quoins picked out and with roof with stacks to left and to right and to rear centre and with central gable with pendant bargeboard and datestone inscribed: AD 1846 Three multi paned cross windows on first floor and sash to left and casement to right on ground floor, right end windows on both floors with louvred shutters. Basement openings to left and to right. Paired ribbed and studded doors to centre in single four centred arched surround with moulded hood and flights of 2 steps. Iron rails to right hand steps and basement area.
Faversham CPME13 8JP27-Sep-89TR 01399 60705
1261010Memorials to the victims of the 1916 Faversham Munitions ExplosionC20MemorialII*Memorial over the mass grave of the victims of the Faversham Munitions Explosion, 1916. A large free-standing stone recording the names of those buried elsewhere lies 0.5m to the east and is included in the listing.
Faversham was home to England’s first gunpowder plant, set up in the C16. Among new manufactories set up there at the start of the First World War was the Explosives Loading Company, on a remote sea-marsh site at Uplees. It manufactured TNT charges for shells, torpedoes and mines. The high risk of explosion meant that many safety precautions were in place there. Employees could only smoke in mess rooms and all cigarette, pipes and matches had to be put in pigeon-holes when people arrived for work. All buttons were made of wood, as were tramway rails, to avoid the possibility of sparks. Horses had brass horseshoes for the same reason and women were not allowed metal hair grips. Buildings were well spaced out and made of wood, built without metal nails.
Building 833, a wooden shed on the site, was used to store 15 tons of TNT and 150 tons of ammonium nitrate. On 2 April 1916 a fire broke out there. The cause remains uncertain. There had been a small fire the day before, apparently caused by a spark from a boiler house – it had faulty spark arrestors – which had set fire to empty linen bags that had been filled with TNT and were waiting to be refilled. These bags may have smouldered and burst into flames again, although the subsequent inquiry into the disaster which reported on 17 April 1916 stated that fresh sparks from the boiler house had been the cause. The management was absolved of all blame.
Whatever precipitated the fire, the burning bags quickly set the shed ablaze. Despite the efforts of the works’ fire brigade and another from the nearby Cotton Powder Company which shared the site and manufactured nitro-glycerine products, the fire took hold. Workers rushed to move the heavy boxes of TNT; others frantically passed fire buckets hand-over-hand filled with water from the nearest dyke. Two hundred people, including the military, were involved, and the Faversham fire brigades were on their way. Notwithstanding those efforts, at 2.20pm three massive explosions blasted a crater the width of a football pitch and the depth of a house. The explosion killed at least 108 – leaving many bodies unrecognisable – and injured 64. Windows were shattered in Southend-on-Sea 15 miles away across the Thames estuary, Norwich over 100 miles away was shaken and the explosion was heard in France.
Government censorship and a press blackout – for fear of alerting the enemy – ensured that the disaster was barely reported and it remained one of the best kept secrets of the First World War. The explosion was, and remains, the worst accident in casualty terms in the 450-year history of the British explosives industry. Seventy-three of the victims were buried in a mass grave at Faversham’s Love Lane cemetery. The Cemetery Register records that only 34 could be recorded by name; the others could not be individually identified, the Register simply stating ‘a male person unknown.’ All the victims were men or boys – no women worked at the plant over the weekend – the oldest 61, the youngest 17. Thirty-five victims were buried elsewhere at the request of their families.
David Lloyd George, Minister of Munitions, and a quickly-formed government committee, produced a secret report that endorsed the findings of the initial inquiry. They were appalled at short-comings on the site and listed eight recommendations for improving safety. But they also recognized that wartime conditions with the factory working on permanent overtime to produce the maximum output of explosives meant that it was virtually impossible to follow normal peacetime rules. The devastated factory was quickly rebuilt and was soon back in full production.
The memorial was unveiled and dedicated on 27 September 1917 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Randall Davidson.
The mass grave is in the central part of the cemetery, oriented approximately north-south in alignment with the grid pattern walkways. The grave comprises a low, granite-kerbed enclosure, about 10m by 50m, with regular low piers with caps, and flights of steps at either end flanked by urn-topped piers. At the centre of the grave is a large free-standing Celtic cross raised on a three-stepped base.
The principal dedicatory inscription on the front face of the base reads SACRED TO THE/ MEMORY OF THE MEN/ WHO DIED IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR/ COUNTRY 2ND. APRIL 1916./ ‘FATHER IN THY GRACIOUS KEEPING/ LEAVE NOW THY SERVANTS SLEEPING.’ The names of the victims of the explosion buried here are leaded into the wall coping, with the names of those buried elsewhere appearing on a large free-standing stone c0.5m to the east, also included in the listing but not mapped.
This List entry has been amended to add sources for War Memorials Online and the War Memorials Register. These sources were not used in the compilation of this List entry but are added here as a guide for further reading, 30 November 2016.
Faversham CPME13 8JQ27-Sep-89TR 02503 60871
1069461RAILINGS IN FRONT OF NO 49NARailingsIITHE MALL 1. – 1103 Railings in front of No 49 TR 0160 12/141B II
Plain iron railings with pointed finials and square standards with pointed heads enclosing space before No 49 on north and west sides. Small gates of similar pattern of iron work in centre of west side and in north-east corner.
Faversham CPME13 8JW03-Aug-72TR 01376 60658
132006249, THE MALLC19BuildingIITHE MALL 1. – ll03 No 49 TR 0160 12/141A II
Early C19. 2 storeys, 3 windows. Stuccoed, ground floor rusticated. Stringcourse. Parapet formerly with cornice. Glazing bars intact on the ground floor only. Hipped tiled roof. Round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight and 6-panel door.
Faversham CPME13 8JW03-Aug-72TR 01387 60655
134387238 AND 42, PRESTON GROVEC18HouseIIPRESTON GROVE 1. – llO3 Nos 38 & 42 TR 0l6O 12/266 II
Pair of late C18-early Cl9 houses. 3 storeys and basement. 2 window bays each. Red brick front; capped parapet. Windows 4 panes wide. Basement windows have been altered. Flights of 4 steps with iron hand- rails lead up to round headed doorways. 6 panelled doors in reveals with upper 4 panels moulded. Semi-circular fanlights, fanlight in no 38 with tracery.
Faversham CPME13 8JY03-Aug-72TR 01491 60631
1069436GROVE HOUSEC19HouseIIPRESTON GROVE 1. – 1103 No 16 (Grove House) TR 0160 12/141 II
Early C19 and earlier. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 3 dormers. Red brick. Eaves cornice. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with pilasters and projecting cornice. On ground floor to left hand original casement window with leaded glazing.
Faversham CPME13 8JZ03-Aug-72TR 01532 60729
1240501NOS 37 AND 37A AND RAILED BASEMENT AREAC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) F80 12/365 Nos 37 and 37A and railed basement Area Interior not inspected GV II
House, now house pair. Circa 1840. Stock brick and (originally) slate roof, now not visible. Two storeys and basement with parapet and stack to centre. Two late C20 top hung casements in imitation of glazing bar sashes on first floor and one to right on ground floor and to basement. Door of 6 moulded panels to left on ground floor with fine traceried fanlight in semi-circular headed surround and at head of flight of flying steps, with simple rails, and also railed area with railed steps down. All openings with gauged brick heads. Not part of the original terrace started here 1829, but marked on the 1841 Tithe Map.
Faversham CPME13 8LA27-Sep-89TR 01416 60740
1260977CROWN AND ANCHOR PUBLIC HOUSEC19Public HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) (F 76) 12/366 Crown and Anchor public house Interior not inspected GV II
Public House. Circa 1846, certainly in existence by 1847 (brewery records); altered early C20. Red brick and slate roof. Three storeys with boxed eaves to hipped roof with stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 3 half sized glazing bar sashes on second floor, 3 full sized on first floor and plate glass ‘pub’ windows on ground floor, that to right in englarged opening with keyed segmental head. Central half-glazed door in moulded round headed doorway with moulded brick pilaster and cornice surround, and half-glazed door inserted to right with keyed segmental head to match altered window; scrolled wrought iron sign bracket with painted sign at right on first floor. Return and rear elevations with regular sashed fenestration. Reported altera- tions to interior.
See Faversham Papers no.19, Inns and Taverns of Faversham.
Faversham CPME13 8LA27-Sep-89TR 01403 60715
1260974NOS 33 AND 35 AND RAILED BASEMENT AREAS THE ELEPHANT PUBLIC HOUSEC19Public HouseIIFAVERSHAM THE MALL TR 0160 (east side) (F 77, 78 & 79) 12/364 The Elephant Public House and nos 33 & 35 and railed basement Areas Interior not inspected GV II
Terrace row, now part converted to public house. Started 1829-30 and finished by 1841. Extended and altered mid C19 and 1918. Rendered brick with slate and inappropriate replacement concrete tiled roof. Two storeys with basements and parapet to roof with 4 stacks ranged from left to right with additional stack projecting at centre left. The first floor remains relatively consistent with the terrace origin, with 6 glazing bar sashes and 2 late C20 oversized replacement top hung casements to right. Ground floor of public house built out in mid C19 with painted brick, single storey on plinth with parapet, with 3 half-glazed doors and central paired plate windows with central colonette. 1918 extension to right of this with rusticated baroque style pilastered block, with scrolled segmentally pedimented parapet and columned pier between plate window and half-glazed door to right. Ground floor of adjacent houses with single glazing bar sash and replacement casement to No 35, and panelled and half-glazed doors in semi-circular headed surrounds, both at head of flights of flying steps with simple iron rails. Railed basement areas with simple spear headed rails, and basements with casement windows and half-glazed doors. The first houses were built by a local carpenter, John Venner, the others completed by 1841 (Tithe Map); by 1842 part converted to brewhouse and regis- tered as the French Horn public house by 1868. See Faversham Papers No 19, Inns and Taverns of Faversham. Included for group value.
Faversham CPME13 8LB27-Sep-89TR 01420 60755
1261084GROVE COTTAGEC17HouseII659/12/7
FAVERSHAM, PRESTON GROVE, Grove Cottage
30672
House. Late C17/early C18 with C19 addition. Red brick with some blue brick with lower red brick addition projecting to right. Plain tiled roofs with slope stack to rear and end stack on wing. 2 storeys with plat-bands on C17 wing. 2 storeys with garrets on original block. Irregular fenestration with 1 window on both floors of each face inside the angle of the ‘L’. Blocked window on 1st floor of left return front of main block. Large C19 casements. Boarded door in angle of ‘L’ on C19 wing.
Faversham CPME13 8LB22-Dec-83TR 01513 60748
1069437WALL ENCLOSING CHURCHYARD ON WEST SIDEC19WallIIPRESTON LANE 1. – llO3 Wall enclosing Churchyard on West Side TR 0160 12/142A II GV
Cl9. Cleft flint with some stone nibble; brick coping. About 5 feet high. Wall incorporated into Sunday School to the north and then extending as far as railway.
St Catherine’s Church, Preston Vicarage and Wall form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8LG03-Aug-72TR 01681 60799
1069438PRESTON VICARAGEPre C18VicarageIIPRESTON LANE 1. – 1103 Preston Vicarage TR 0160 12/143 29.7.50. II GV
Cl8 front to an earlier core. 2 storeys and attic. 4 windows. 2 dormers. Red brick. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Ground floor windows have cambered head linings. Doorway in moulded architrave surround with flat hood over supported on brackets and door of 6 fielded panelds. Cl9 addition at the west end.
St Catherine’s Church, Preston Vicarage and Wall form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8LG29-Jul-50TR 01661 60806
1115766CHURCH OF ST CATHERINEC13ChurchII*PRESTON LANE
St Catherine’s Church TR 0160 12/142 29.7.5O. GV
The church has pre-Conquest origins, but only loose fragments of Anglo-Saxon sculpture survive. By the C12 it had a S aisle. The SE tower is C13. The chancel was rebuilt in the late C13 and remodelled c.1320. There was some further work in the later middle ages, including widening the S aisle. The church was greatly altered in the mid C19. The S arcade was rebuilt in 1853-5 to designs by R C Hussey, replacing the earlier arcade. The N arcade, aisle and porch were added in 1867. The chancel E window, designed by G Austin and said to have been intended for Canterbury Cathedral, was inserted in 1854, and the spire is also mid C19. The church was refurnished in the mid C20.
MATERIALS: Flint with stone dressings. Tiled roofs.
PLAN: Chancel, nave with N and S aisles, SE tower over E bay of S aisle with rounded E stair turret, N porch.
EXTERIOR: The exterior was very heavily reworked in the C19, and the N aisle and N porch are entirely C19. The chancel E window has Geometric style tracery and was inserted in 1854. The chancel N and S walls have C13 lancets, mostly renewed in the C19, and there is also a renewed C14 window with flowing tracery in the western part of the chancel S wall. The S aisle has a low pitched roof, with S windows of two cusped lights and a late Perpendicular W window of three ogee lights in a square frame. Perpendicular style nave W window and the C15 W door retains much original masonry. The C19 N aisle has lancets. The C13 SE tower is of four stages, and has a broach spire added in the C19. The half round E stair turret is also a C19 addition. C19 N and S porches in a simple late C13 style with continuously moulded outer openings with hood moulds.
INTERIOR: The chancel is the best preserved and most significant part of the building. The lancet windows have shafted rere-arches, a continuous hood mould with headstops and a moulded string below. Very fine early C14 sedilia in the S wall, probably related to the insertion of the early C14 window above it and to the ogee headed tomb recess in the N wall. The C19 E window also has a shafted rere-arch and hood mould with head stops. Tall late C13 chancel arch with head corbels. There is a rood stair door in the S side of the chancel arch. The C19 N and S nave arcades are late C13 in style, and have chamfered arches on round piers with moulded capitals. There is a blocked, possibly C13 window in the W wall of the S aisle, probably relating to an earlier, narrower aisle. The base of the SE tower is enclosed and has a door with continuous mouldings to the nave. Organ gallery over W end of nave.
PRINCIPAL FIXTURES: The church has a number of good fittings, both medieval and modern. Unusually elaborate piscina and sedilia of c.1300-20 in the chancel. The piscina has an ogee trefoil opening with foliage on the extrados and a foliate finial. Harshly restored in 1877, the sedilia has a vaulted canopy on shafts with foliate capitals and high, polygonal bases. The gabled and trefoiled arches have been restored without ogees. Fine, unrestored carved heads peep through trefoils in the gables, and there are further carved heads within the vaulting. The back has Westminster-style diaper with traces of original colour. There are some medieval tiles with geometric patterns in the chancel. Probably C15 ogee piscina in S aisle. Late C15 or C16 choir stalls with poppyheads, shaped ends and an embattled top rail. The desk on the N side has much graffiti, including several late C16 dates. There is a fine set of fittings of 1947 by Martin Travers, including the excellent hanging rood, high altar, reredos, statue of the Virgin and bishop’s chair.
The S aisle roof is late medieval and has a panelled canopy of honour over the E bay.
One window with some fine C13 grisaille glass, said to be Belgian, in the chancel N wall. Chancel S windows by Clayton and Bell, 1879.
Good monuments, notably a large and fine alabaster monument for Roger Boyle, d. 1576 and his wife Joan, d. 1586, of Preston, erected in 1629 by their son, Richard Boyle, first Earl of Cork and made by James White. Life-size reclining figures on a tomb chest, surrounded by kneeling figures of their children, that of the Earl also life sized. Several brasses, including Valentine and Cecilia Baret, d.1440 and 1442; William Mareys, d.1459, very complete in superb armour with surrounding inscription tags, and a female figure for Bennet Finch, d. 1612 with an additional wall monument for her and her husband d. 1615. Chancel N wall, early C14 ogee tomb recess. Some good ledger slabs in the floor, including Charles Hulse, d.1678 with a coat of arms.
A loose fragment of Anglo-Saxon interlace ornament probably came from a cross.
HISTORY: A church at Preston is mentioned in the Domesday Book, when it was held by Canterbury Cathedral. No trace of this church survives, although the ‘thick arches’ in the S aisle removed by R C Hussey in 1853-5 are suggestive of pre-Norman work. The chancel was rebuilt in the later C13 and was refitted with the fine sedilia and piscina in the early years of the C14. The ogee tomb recess is probably connected with this work, and may have been for the patron. The S aisle was widened C14 or C15 and retains its late medieval low-pitched roof. The very harsh restorations of the C19, which saw the complete demolition and replacement of much medieval fabric. Carried out during the incumbency of James Peto, vicar 1837-78, this was typical of early Victoria restoration, which often preferred new, medieval-style work to the real thing. The Travers fittings were a memorial to John Hankins Martin, vicar 1912-38.
SOURCES Pevsner, N, Buildings of England: North-East and East Kent (1977), 313-4 Taylor, M, Guide to St Catherines (sic) Church. 1991, rev 2002 Mattieson, O, ‘The stalls of St Catherine’s church at Preston’, Archaeologia Cantiana, 77 (1962), 77-81
Faversham CPME13 8LG29-Jul-50TR 01682 60768
1320272WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN TO PRESTON VICARAGE ON ITS SOUTH SIDEC19WallIIPRESTON LANE 1. – 1103 Wall enclosing garden to Preston Vicarage on its south side TR 0160 12/143A II GV
Cl9. of similar style and construction to wall enclosing western side of churchyard; some modern brick capping. Extends westwards from gate- way to Vicarage as far as no 35.
St Catherine’s Church, Preston Vicarage and Walls form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8LG03-Aug-72TR 01633 60773
1240323FORMER CHERRY TREE PUBLIC HOUSEC18HouseIIFAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston Lea F 86 (attached) 12/352 Former Cherry Tree Public House Interior not inspected GV II
House, sometime public house. C18 or earlier in origin, extended and altered early C20. Painted brick and extended with red brick, with plain tiled roofs. Two parallel ranges with ground floor of front range built out. Two storeys with projecting ground floor with moulded brick dentilled cornice to parapeted flat roof. Main range with boxed eaves to hipped roof with stack to centre right. Gabled rear range with stack at end left. Two glazing bar sashes on first floor and two large C20 casements on ground floor with panelled door to centre with rectangular fanlight and keyed head. Glazing bar sashes on rear elevation. A public house since at least 1816, closed in 1979.
Faversham CPME13 8LR27-Sep-89TR 01758 60505
1240460OUTHOUSE ATTACHED TO RIGHT OF NO 3 CHERRY TREE COTTAGESC19OuthouseIIFAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston Lea F 88 (attached) 12/354 Outhouse attached to right of No 3 Cherry Tree Cottages Interior not inspected GV II
Outhouse. Circa 1845. Red brick and timber framed and clad with weather board- ing, with plain tiled roof. Irregular plan squeezed into corner site. One storey and loft, with gabled dormer to left. Boarded doubled cart doors to left on ground floor, and from ventilation grille to right. Rear elevation with 3 light iron casement of same arched light pattern as adjoining cottage row, but of smaller overall size. As with these cottages, not marked in 1841, but not much later in date.
Faversham CPME13 8LR27-Sep-89TR 01774 60498
1261090CHERRY TREE COTTAGESC19CottageIIFAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston Lea F 86, 87 & 88 12/353 Nos 1-3 Cherry Tree Cottages Interior not inspected GV II
Cottage row. Circa 1845. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with boxed eaves to roof with stacks to centre left and to centre right and with central gabled dormer. Three glazing bar sashes on each floor and three half-glazed and panelled doors on ground floor with semi-circular headed surrounds. All ground floor openings with gauged heads. The garret windows and all but one (reset) of the rear windows preserve metal casements with three pointed arched lights each. A similar window is on the rear of the outhouse attached (see following item). These buildings must date to soon after 1841, since they are not shown on the 1841 Tithe Map.
Faversham CPME13 8LR27-Sep-89TR 01767 60502
1240461THE WINDMILL PUBLIC HOUSEC18Public HouseIIFAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston Lea ADDITIONAL 12/355 The Windmill public house Interior not inspected GV II
Public house, including former house/cottage row. C18 or earlier, extended early C19 and part fenestrated mid C19. Rendered with plain tiled roofs. Two separate buildings in origin and character. The right hand section, the earliest phase, of two storeys with hipped roof and stacks to centre left and to end right. Sash to left and two glazing bar sashes on first floor and two sashes to left on ground floor with central glazing bar sash and multi-pane window to right. Door of 6 panels to centre right with semi-circular headed surround. Catslide outshot to rear. Large scantling ceiling beams reported to interior. A single house originally and on 1841 Tithe Map, by C20 3 cottages and then incorporated into the public house mid-late C20. The left hand build- ing probably a purpose built alehouse, early C19, of 2 storeys with double span roof and stacks to centre and to end left. Two sashes on first floor and three on ground floor with half-glazed door to centre left. Property sale recorded 1824. See Faversham Papers no.19, Inns and taverns of Faversham.
Faversham CPME13 8LU27-Sep-89TR 01786 60497
1240462THATCHED COTTAGESC18CottageIIFAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston Lea F 91 12/356 Nos 1/2 Thatched Cottages Interior not inspected GV II
Cottage pair, now house. C18 and extended C19/C20. Painted brick and thatched roof. Single storey with hipped roof and main central stack with additional stacks to left and to right. Three light C20 wooden casement to left and four 2 light metal C18 or C19 casements to centre and 3 light metal casement to right. Boarded door to centre left with flat hood on brackets.
Faversham CPME13 8LX27-Sep-89TR 01807 60511
13438737 AND 8, PRESTON STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 7 & 8 TR 0161 SE 3/45 4.5.70. II GV
C15 timber-framed houses refronted in the C18, but retaining the overhang of the 1st floor on a moulded bressummer and brackets. Stuccoed front, the ground floor rusticated, the 1st floor with long and short quoins. Wooden eaves cornice, No 7 with modillions. Tiled roofs. Modern shop fronts and modern windows on lst floor. 2 storeys. 4 windows. No 8 has an attic storey with 3 hipped dormers.
Nos 7 to 19A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NS04-May-70TR 01619 61260
106944676 AND 76A, PRESTON STREETC15Timber-framed BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 76 2 76A TR 0161 SE 3/62 29.7.5O. II GV
C15. Timber-framed building, refronted in the Cl8, but retaining the overhang of its lst floor facing the street and also jettied on the South side fronting Cross Lane on the protruding ends of the floor joists and a row of brackets, the lst floor on this side having the timber-framing still exposed with curved braces. The front has 2 storeys and 2 windows. Ground floor stuccoed, and rusticated but now entirely made up of 2 modern shop fronts. Above red brick with a wooden cornice and cemented parapet. 2 Venetian windows on lst floor, the glazing bars intact. 2 doorways in the centre of shop fronts, right hand 1 with pilasters and projecting cornice beneath the overhang of the 1st floor. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 73 to 78 (consec) and No 78A form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NU29-Jul-50TR 01581 61215
106944777, PRESTON STREETC17Timber-framed BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 77 TR 0161 SE 3/63 II GV
Early Cl9 front to a C17 timber-framed building. Narrow frontage. 3 storeys, 1 window. Stuccoed. Parapet. Steeply pitched tiled roof with gable at ends. Glazing bars missing. Modern shop front. Photo- graph in NMR.
Nos 73 to 78 (consec) and No 78A form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NU03-Aug-72TR 01582 61220
132032778 AND 78A, PRESTON STREETC17BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 78 & 78A TH Ql6l SE 3/279 II GV
C19 front to C17 building. 2 storeys and attic. 4 windows. Tiled gabled roof with 2 gabled dormers. Stuccoed front. Moulded cornice with dentils and ovolo moulding. Panelled stuccoed parapet with capping. Clock with elaborate wrought iron bracket. Projects from 1st floor of No 78. Windows in reveals behind moulded frames. Late C19 cutvilinear shop front on ground floor to South; C2O plate-glass shop front to North.
Nos 75 to 78 (consec) and No 78A form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NU03-Aug-72TR 01585 61227
1069440FAVERSHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL OFFICESC19OfficeIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 15 to 17 (consec) (Faversham Borough Council TR 0161 SE 3/270 Offices) II GV
Circa 1840. In 2 sections. Northernmost section projects slightly forward; 2 storesy and attic; 7 window bays. Southern section of 2 storeys; 3 window bays. Slate roof. 3 segmental headed dormers. Overhanging eaves on paired brackets. Red brick front. 2 round headed centre windows in northern section above prostyle porch. Prostyle porch with 2 Ionic columns and 2 end Ionic pilasters supporting an entablature. Windows without glazing bars; rubbed brick voussoirs with stuccoed keystones. Stringcourse above ground floor windows.
No 7 to l9A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NX03-Aug-72TR 01599 61192
132027714, PRESTON STREETC15Timber-framed HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 14 TR 0161 SE 3/48 29.7.50. II GV
L-shaped C15 timber-framed house, refronted with stucco on the 1st floor and the ground floor underbuilt with a modern shop front, but its south front overhanging on a bressumer and brackets. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Casement windows with small square leaded panes on 1st floor. Modern shop front below. The east wing behind has some timbering exposed with plaster infilling, but is partly faced with weather-boarding. It has 2 original windows of 5 lights each with wooden mullions and diamond leaded panes of old green glass.
Nos 7 to 19A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NX29-Jul-50TR 01600 61212
13438411-6, GATEFIELD LANEC18BuildingIIGATEFIELD LANE 1. – ll03 Nos 1 to 6 (consec) TR 0l6l SE 3/233 II GV
Late Cl8 to early C19. 2 storeys. 6 windows. Tiled hipped roof. Red brick fronts; Nos 1 to 3 painted brick. Windows with glazing bars missing except in No 4; double hung sashes in Nos 1 and 3. Shop fronts on ground floor in Nos 1, 2, 3 and 6. Nos 4 and 5 have segmental headed windows on ground floor with rubbed brick voussoirs; plain wooden house doors in frames with small flat hoods on brackets over. Graded II for group value within conservation area.
No 1A, Nos 1 to 8 (consec) and the Faversham Club form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NX03-Aug-72TR 01627 61203
134387413, Preston StreetC15Timber-framed HouseIIFAVERSHAM PRESTON STREET (East Side) No 13
C15. Timber-framed building refronted in C18 but retaining the overhang of its first floor on a bressummer. Two storeys. Two windows. Ground floor painted brick, first floor stuccoed. Cornice and parapet. Tiled roofs. Modern windows. Panelling inside. Associated with the murder of Arden of Faversham. Originally called the Flower-de-Luce Inn.
Nos 7 to 19A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NX29-Jul-50TR 01604 61221
106943912, PRESTON STREETC18BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – No 12 TR 0161 SE 3/314 II GV
Cl8 to early Cl9 front. 3 storeys. 1 window bay. Tiled gabled roof. Painted mathematical tiled front. Square windows in frames; glazimg bars missing. C2o plate glass shop front and modern fascia on ground floor.
Nos 7 to 19A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NY03-Aug-72TR 01605 61228
11157739-11, PRESTON STREETPre C18Timber-framed HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 9 to 11 (consec) TR 0161 SE 3/46 4.5.70. – II GV
Timber-framed houses refronted in Cl8. 2 storeys, 4 windows. No 9 now fronted with roughbast, Nos 10 and 11 stuccoed. Eaves cornice. Tiled roofs. No 9 has casement windows on the 1st floor with a cove beneath them and small square leaded panes. Casement windows in Nos 10 and 11. C19 shop front also to nos 10 and 11; house door at northern end; flanked by fluted pilasters, with cornice and fascia over; butcher’s hooks.
Nos 7 to l9A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8NY04-May-70TR 01607 61238
106944118 AND 19, PRESTON STREETC18BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – Nos 18 & 19 TR 0161 SE 3/49 II GV
1 building. C18. 2 storeys. 5 windows and 3 hipped dormers in all. Stuccoed, Modillion eaves cornice. Glazing bars intact on 1st floor. Modern shop fronts. Lean-to addition at the south side.
Nos 7 to l9A (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8PA03-Aug-72TR 01588 61174
106944569, PRESTON STREETC18BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 69 TR 0l6l 3E 3/60 II GV
C18. 2 storeys and attic. 2 windows. 2 hipped dormers. Red brick. Tiled roof. Casement windows. Small C19 shop window, and doorway to North.
Nos 69 to 71 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8PA03-Aug-72TR 01564 61164
1320303THE HOLE IN THE WALL INNC16Public HouseIIPRESTON STEET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Nos 73 & 74 No 75 (The Hole in the Wall Inn) TR 0161 SE 3/61 29.7.50. II GV
1 roof span. C16. Timber-framed building, altered in the C18, but retaining the overhang of its 1st floor on a bressummer. C19 and later shop fronts with early Cl9 bay window at South end. Above plastered. Cornice and parapet. Tiled roofs. Modern casement windows. 2 storeys, 4 windows.
Nos 73 to 78 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8PA29-Jul-50TR 01577 61203
134385838, STONE STREETC18BuildingIISTONE STREET 1. – 1103 No 38 TH ol6l SE 3/59A II GV
This property is numbered in Stone Street, but its facade faces Preston Street. C18. 2 storeys. 1 window. Red brick. Cornice and parapet. Glazing barn intact above ground floor. Modern shop front. Rusticated segmental-headed doorway on the South side. Projects beyond East front of No 67 Preston Street.
No 38 forms a group with No 67 Preston Street.
Faversham CPME13 8PA03-Aug-72TR 01558 61146
124030526, 27 AND 27A, PRESTON STREETC19BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. ll03 (East Side) – No 26 Nos 27 & 27A TR 0161 SE 3/273 II
Early Cl9. 2 storeys with capped parapet. 1 window to No 26. No 26 painted brick with simple lettering above 1st floor window and with an early C20 shop front on ground floor. 5 windows to nos 27 and 27A. Nos 27 and 27A red brick, once painted. Segmental headed passageway to left of centre on ground floor. C19 shop front and doorway to left of this, both doorway and windows flanked by narrow pilasters with moulded fascia and cornice over. Wider shop d +~+< front to south of passageway with central doorway and with C19 casing of pilasters with plain fascia and moulded cornice over.
Faversham CPME13 8PE03-Aug-72TR 01563 61107
124030637, PRESTON STREETC18BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (East Side) – No 37 TR 0161 SE 3/275 II
C18. 3 storeys. 2 windows. Tiled roof with hip to south end. Wood eaves cornice. West and south fronts weather-boarded. Glazing bars intact in 2nd floor windows. Late Cl9 or early C2O plate-glass shop front with sloping fascia and end pieces.
Faversham CPME13 8PE03-Aug-72TR 01543 61044
1240444THE DRILL HALLC19HallIIFAVERSHAM PRESTON STREET TR 0161 SE 3/329 The Drill Hall GV II
Assembly rooms, now used as drill hall. Circa 1849 by Martin Bulmer, Architect and Thomas Ware builder. Flemish bond stock brick, stuccoed at front. Low- pitched hipped slate roof, with gable at rear. Rendered stack on right hand side with moulded cornice. Plan: Rectangular plan assembly room 54′ long by 28’6″ wide with a gallery at the front-and a porch on the right hand side entered from the front. Exterior: Single storey. Symmetrical 3-bay front to the assembly room with a porch set back slightly on the right, both with deep moulded eaves cornices, rusticated stucco quoins and moulded plinths. The 3-bay assembly room to the left has 3 large windows each with moulded eaved architraves, moulded sills and later casements. The porch set back on right has a wide doorway with a moulded architrave and C19 moulded and panelled double doors. The right hand side of the porch has 12-pane sashes. The left hand side abuts on adjoining building. At the rear there are 2 small round-headed louvred windows high up in the gable. Interior: is largely intact. Around the walls a moulded plinth and paired pilasters with plaster console brackets supporting the ceiling. The moulded ceiling cornice might survive above the existing ceiling. The 3 octagonal lanterns have lost their original glazing and the cornices around their drums are later replacements. The balcony has a cast-iron balustrade and panelled double doors below. At the opposite end there is a doorway with panelled double doors in a moulded architrave with a cornice and panel above in an eaved architrave Note: The original assembly rooms in Faversham were in Market Street. They were superceded in 1839 by a suite of rooms on the present site which were destroyed by fire in 1848 and replaced by the existing building in circa 1849. Sources: The Faversham Society possesses relevant documents. Faversham Institute Journal. Country Life 1.9.86 pp 766-8.
Faversham CPME13 8PG16-Jan-89TR 01536 61105
124044664 AND 65, PRESTON STREETC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM PRESTON STREET TR 0161 SE 3/277 Nos 64 and 65 GV II
Pair of houses with shop premises. Circa mid C19, possibly 1849 the date of the assembly room (The Drill hall qv.). Flemish bond stock brick, Slate roof with gabled ends. Brick axial stacks. Plan: Double depth plan range, possibly originally 3 houses. The left hand and centre houses have what appear to be later C19 shop fronts and the right hand and centre houses (No 65) appear to be one house now. There is a late C20 extension on the right hand end (No 66). Exterior: 2 storeys and attic. 3-bay front with brick pilasters, moulded stucco cornice and parapet. C19 12-pane sashes, the ground floor left and centre has 2 late C19 or early C20 shop fronts with pilasters, entablatures with blind cases and glazed and panelled doors. Behind the parapet 3 large C20 flat roof dormers. Rear elevations were not inspected. Interiors not inspected.
Faversham CPME13 8PG16-Jan-89TR 01549 61117
1240322HOUSE IMMEDIATELY TO WEST NORTH WEST OF DRILL HALLC19HouseIIFAVERSHAM PRESTON STREET TR 0161 SE 3/276 House immediately to west north west of Drill Hall GV II
House possibly associated with former assembly rooms (Drill Hall qv.). Circa mid C19 possibly 1849 the date of the assembly rooms. Stuccoed, weatherboarded at rear. Low-pitched slate hipped roof. Plan: 2-room plan with a central entrance. The staircase is probably in the central projection at the back. Situated in yard behind the former assembly rooms. Exterior: 2 storeys. Symmetrical 3-window front. C19 16-pane sashes, the central first floor window has 12-panes. Central doorway with a panelled door and moulded architrave with a segmental arch over the overlight. At the rear the centre is advanced slightly and has a C19 12-pane sash on the first floor. Interior: Not inspected.
Faversham CPME13 8PJ16-Jan-89TR 01508 61120
106944457 AND 58, PRESTON STREETC19HouseIIPRESTON STREET 1. l103 (West Side) – Nos 57 & 58 TR 0l6l SE 3/57 4.5.70. II GV
Early C19 block of 2 houses built as 1 composition, but refronted with roughcast on ground floor. 3 storeys. 5 windows. Ground floor rusticated. Stringcourse above it. Cornice and parapet formerly with panel in centre. The 3 centre window bays project. Glazing bars intact above ground floor. Recessed segmental-headed doorways in moulded architrave surrounds, with segmental fanlights and pilasters flanking the doors.
No 53 and Nos 55 to 59 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8PQ04-May-70TR 01507 61015
1115660THE LIMES HOTELC18HotelIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – No 59 (The Limes Hotel) TR 0161 SE 3/58 29.7.5O. II GV
Cl8. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 dormers. Roughcast. Overhanging eaves replacing parapet with recessed rectangular panels over lst floor windows. Glazing bars intact. Tiled roof. Good doorway with fluted Doric pilasters, triglyph frieze and pediment. To North of this shop a shop window flanked by similar pilasters with cornice over, but modern window inserted in this. Doorway leading to the Bar in splayed angle with the corner projecting over it. Curved bay on ground floor of North front containing a 3-light window.
No 53 and Nos 55 to 59 (consec) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8PQ29-Jul-50TR 01514 61032
1418393Faversham War MemorialC20War MemorialIIMonument to the fallen of the First and Second World War unveiled by Vice Admiral Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas on 3 November 1922.
It is not known who crafted the memorial, but it was unveiled by Vice Admiral Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas on 3 November 1922, to commemorate the men of Faversham who fell in the First World War. The memorial was subsequently also used to commemorate the fallen of the Second World War.
No names are recorded on the memorial, but an oak memorial panel in the Church of St Mary of Charity in Faversham is dedicated to the 199 men of Faversham who fell in The Great War and a book of remembrance marks their names with a separate book for the names of those who fell in the Second World War.
There is a further memorial of The Great War in Faversham Borough cemetery; to the 109 men and boys killed by an explosion at the Faversham Gunpowder Works on 2 April 1916.
A granite Celtic cross with a tapering shaft set on a tall tapering base. The cross sits on a square plinth on a two-stepped base with a flower holder placed in front. The cross face is enriched with relief decoration and floral bosses. The memorial is enclosed by later metal railings on a stone kerb, between granite piers.
The inscription on the base and flower holder reads:
IN / MEMORY OF OUR / GLORIOUS DEAD / 1914-1918 / 1939-1945 / GREATER LOVE HATH NO MAN / THAN THIS THAT A MAN LAY DOWN / HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIENDS / LEST WE FORGET
This List entry has been amended to add sources for War Memorials Online and the War Memorials Register. These sources were not used in the compilation of this List entry but are added here as a guide for further reading, 30 November 2016.
Former Military Hospital
Faversham CPME13 8PR15-Jan-14TR 01418 61176
1240321WARREN HOUSEC19HouseIIThe following building shall be included in the list:
FAVERSHAM STONE STREET TR 0161 SW 2/293 No 60 ‘Warren House’ II
House. Dated 1889, built for Mr Charles Smith Master Grocer of Faversham and three times Lord Mayor of Faversham. Built of brown brick with stone and terracotta dressings. Hipped slate roof with end tall and elaborate panelled brick chimney-stacks. 2 storeys and attic with belvedere and basement. 3 windows. Central belvedere has hipped roof with ball finial and 2 x 6 paned sashes. 2 two-light dormers with curved pediments and urn finials, elaborate brick cornice of pseudo machicolations. Left side has 2 storey projecting square bay of 4 lights with terracotta apron to 1st floor and brick aprons to ground floor. Centre 1st floor plain sash and right side 2 storey canted bay with pediment above ground floor window. Open pedimented door-case dated 1889 with terracotta pilasters and 6 panelled door and flight of steps to street level with attached red brick wall with 7 square panelled piers with stone caps and cast iron railings with pedimented features. Rear elevation has a series of cambered headed sashes and central wooden porch. The interior is remarkable for its very complete survival of late C19 painted and stencilled decorations and original light fittings and patent air ventilation system. The entrance hall has stained glass to the upper part of the door by Swaine Bourne of Birmingham with 3 light fanlight and side lights with leaded lights and some painted panels of birds and floral motifs. Cornice has stencilled swag decoration and stencilled friezes with fruit decorations. Wooden dogleg staircase with narrow turned balusters 2 to a step and stencilled dado. 2 round-headed arches with stencilled decoration. 3 sash windows in the hall have stained glass panels by Swaine Bourne of Birmingham. Drawing room has the original wall paper to west wall, ceiling rose with fruit and moulded cornice. Marble fireplace with lozenge decoration and brackets. 2 original gas lamp brackets survive. The 4 panelled door is painted with a design of roses by Margaret Smith, the daughter of the original owner. Sitting room has a plaster ceiling rose marble fireplace and voice pipe communicating with the Kitchen. The Library has a plaster ceiling rose and marble fireplace with tiled surround. The stencilled decoration continues to the basement where the Dining room is situated. This has a ceiling rose, gaselier, and door decorated with painted sunflowers ,dahlias, carnations and daisies. There is a complete set of servants’ bells with original Leclanché Cells. The inner walls are lined with slate shelves. Kitchen has tiled and marble fireplace and late C19 cast iron range. Top floor has studio with north facing roof light. Included for the rare completeness of original decoration and fittings.
Faversham CPME13 8PS20-May-88TR 01325 61240
1115673WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN BEHIND WREIGHTS HOUSE ON SOUTH SIDEC18WallIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side – Wall enclosing garden behind Wreights House on South Side TR 0160 12/53B II GV
Cl8 to Cl9. High wall of red brick.
Nos 49 (Mall House No 50 (Wreights House) Stables to Wreights House and Walls form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8QQ03-Aug-72TR 01427 60897
1115700WALL ENCLOSING GARDEN BEHIND NO 49 (MALL HOUSE) ON NORTH SIDEC18WallIIPRESTON STREET 1. 1103 (West Side) – Wall enclosing garden behind No 49 (Mall House) on North Side TR 0160 12/52B II GV
Cl8. High red brick wall on rendered plinth.
Nos 49 (Mall House) No 5O (Wreights House Stables to Wreights House and Walls form group.
Faversham CPME13 8QQ03-Aug-72TR 01426 60895
1240308MALL HOUSEC18BuildingIIPRESTON STREET 1. ll03 (West Side) – No 49 (Mall House) TR 0160 12/52 29.7.50. II GV
This house and Wreights House to the North are cut off from the main part of Preston Street by the railway and now appear to stand in the Mall, as there is no communication between the part of the street in which they stand and Preston Street, except a subway for pedestrians only under the railway, but both houses are still numbered in Preston Street and considered by the Rate Office to be in it. Built in 1743. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 hipped dormers, Red brick. Brick stringcourse and eaves cornice with Portland stone or cemented blocking course. Hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Door- way with engaged Doric columns, projecting cornice and door of 4 fielded panels, upper 2 fielded. Photograph in NMR.
Nos 49 (Mall House) No 5O (Wreights House) Stables to Wreights House and Walls form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8QQ29-Jul-50TR 01443 60882
1343835WREIGHTS HOUSEC19HouseIIThis List entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 18/02/2018
The Mall, Wreights House
(Formerly listed as: PRESTON STREET (West Side), No. 50 (Wreights House))
One house. Early C19. Two storeys and attic. Six windows. One dormer. Red brick. Eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with engaged Doric columns, projecting cornice, rectangular fanlight and door of four fielded panels, bottom two flush panels.
Nos 49 (Mall House), Weights House, Stables to Wreights House and Walls form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8QQ29-Jul-50TR 01452 60899
1240509STABLE BUILDING (?) BETWEEN NOS 22 AND 23C18StablesIIFAVERSHAM NIGHTINGALE ROAD TR 0161 SW (west side) (F 66) 2/369 Stable building (?) between nos.22 & 23 Interior not inspected II
Stable/coach-house or workshop. C18 in appearance, but possibly mid C19. Rubble and flint with red brick dressings and plain tiled roof. Two storeys with brick quoins to gabled roof. Central boarded loft door and central half- doors on ground floor. Boarded doubled cart doors to right. The materials suggest reuse from an older site but the building may be of some age; extant by the time of the 1865 Ordnance Survey, although not marked on a Town Plan of 1774 nor the 1842 Tithe map, this does not preclude its existence at these dates. In any event a rare survival.
Faversham CPME13 8RF27-Sep-89TR 01044 61135
1240317FORMER WILLIAM GIBBS SCHOOLC19SchoolIIORCHARD PLACE Former William Gibbs School TR 0161 SE 3/31 II
Former school. Dated 1882 on terracotta plaque on front elevation. Built by Richard Gibbs, a tea planter, and named in honour of his brother William Gibbs a local amateur archaeologist.In Queen Anne style. Built of red brick with some stone dressings, terracotta panels and tiled roof with alternately 4 bands of scolloped and 4 bands of plain tiles, terracotta ridge tiles and clustered ribbed brick chimney stacks. Asymmetrical plan of 2 storeys, attic and basement. South elevation has brick dentil cornice, moulded bands and plinth. 6 windows. Left side projecting bay with gabled attic window with wooden bargeboard and projecting 3 light bay through ground and first floors with end pilasters and triple cambered sashes divided by stone fluted Ionic pilasters and with keystones. Panelled parapet. Terracotta panels between ground and lst floors, with central female bust and end panels of apples. 2nd bay from left has tall sash with horns and keystone; 3rd bay has projecting 2 storey porch with 1st floor tall sash with horns and keystone and ground floor porch with brick ogee arch. 4 panelled door, the top 2 panels glazed. 4th bay has gabled tile hung attic storey with 1 triple mullioned and transomed window and 3 light canted bay to ground and first floors. 1st floor cambered arched mullioned and transomed windows with keystones. Ground floor flat arched window divided by brick pilasters. Panelled parapet and semi-circular floral terracotta panels between floors. 2 right side end bays have 2 cambered mullioned and transomed casements with keystones. Terracotta panels between floors, one with pomegranates the other with oranges(?)and dated 188East elevation is of 2 storeys and has to left a 3 light canted bay with mullioned and transomed casements and floral terracotta panel above 1st floor and semi-circular floral patterns above ground floor. Projecting portion with one storey gabled section with buttresses and 6 light mullioned and transomed casement. To right is a further 2 storey portion with 1:2 windows, one 5 light mullioned and transomed window and one 2 light cambered window with keystone to ground floor. West elevation has 2 gabled semi-dormers and irregular fenestration of sashes with keystones.
Faversham CPME13 8RP24-Feb-87TR 01872 61366
1343852MALTHOUSE AND OASTHOUSE AT PERRY COURT FARMC20Oast HouseIIBROGDALE ROAD 1. 1103 (East Side) – Malthouse and Oasthouse at Perry Court Farm TR 0060 1l/165 II
This is a fine building of its kind, dating from 1904 [documented]. It is a composite building consisting of 2 square oast houses at the East end, 1 at the West end and a 3-storey malthouse or granary between. Red brick. The centre portion has 3 storeys and 4 windows. Slate roof. Casement windows with cambered head linings. Double doors with bambered head linings, on the ground floor only on the North side, but on each floor on the South side with gabled hood over the 2nd floor supported on brackets. The oast houses at the ends of the buildings have pyramidal slate roofs with the tops cut off to make way for the cowls.
Faversham CPME13 8RY03-Aug-72TR 00970 60382
1069460CHAPEL HOUSEC18HouseIILONDON ROAD 1. – 1103 Chapel House TR 0060 11/166 29.7.50. II
C18 house altered in the early C19. 2 storeys and attic. 3 windows. 2 dormers. Originally brick, now painted. Brick stringcourse. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Venetian shutters to 1st floor windows. Porch flanked by columns with projecting cornice over. Doorway with rectangular fanlight.
Faversham CPME13 8SN29-Jul-50TR 00871 60695
1320058OSPRINGE PLACEC18HouseIILONDON ROAD 1. – 1103 Ospringe Place. TR 0060 11/167 29.7.50. II
Square late C18 house. [1799 by Charles Beazley]. 2 storeys. White brick. Glazing bars intact. The entrance front facing north has 3 windows. Cornice and balustraded parapet. The centre window bay is stuccoed. Wide porch with twin fluted Doric columns, triglyph frieze and projecting cornice; the window above this on the 1st floor is flanked by twin Doric pilasters. The east and west fronts have 5 windows each. Projecting centre portion of 3 windows with wide eaves bracket cornice and pediment. The side portions have a cornice and balustraded parapet as on the north front, and their ground floor windows are in round-headed arches with semi-circular tympana. In the centre of the roof is a round glass lantern which lights the staircase. A brick and Weather- boarded cottage at the south end with round-headed sash windows on ground floor with radiating glazing pattern.
Faversham CPME13 8TB29-Jul-50TR 00731 60687
1343843THE MOUNTC18BuildingIILONDON ROAD 1. – 1103 The Mount TR 0060 11/168 II
Formerly, the Office of the Ministry of National Insurance and the County Agricultural Emergency Committee. C18. The main front faces south. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 3 dormers. Brick, painted. Brick stringcourse. Wooden modiliion eaves cornice. Tiled roof. The dormer windows are surmounted by pediments, the centre one triangular, the outer ones curved. Glazing bars missing. The whole of the ground floor is hidden by Victorian glass conservatory which extends the whole width of the south front. The east front has 5 Windows and porch originally with 2 pairs of fluted Doric columns, although end pair is now missing; pediment, round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight and 2 narrow round-headed lights flanking it between the columns.
Faversham CPME13 8TH03-Aug-72TR 00566 60831
10694271 AND 3, OSPRINGE STREETC18BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 1 & 3 TR 0060 11/257 II GV
C18. 2 storeys. 1 window each. Timber-framed construction with weather- boarding on red brick sleeper wall. Hipped tiled roof; central rendered Stack. 3 light casement windows with frames; lst floor leaded glazing. Ground floor of No 3 altered. Square-headed doorways approached by steps; panelled doors with architrave frames.
Nos 1 to l9 (odd) forn a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TJ03-Aug-72TR 00453 60833
10694285-9, OSPRINGE STREETC18CottageIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – Nos 5 to 9 (odd) TR 0060 11/258 II GV
C18 range of cottages. 2 storeys, 1 window each, except No 9 with 2 windows (forming 2 cottages). Hipped tiled roof; red brick stacks. Nos 5 and 9 painted brick, No 7 stuccoed. No 5 slightly recessed; ground floor rebuilt with early C19 segmental bowed window of 3 lights with glazing bars. Nos 7 and 9 1st floor casement windows, No 7 with leaded lights. Sliding sash on ground floor in No 7 and segmental bowed ground floor window with horizontal glazing bars removed in No 9. Segmental arched doorways in Nos 5 and 7. Doorway of former cottage incorporated into No 9. No 7 with ground floor goods entrance attached and 1st floor loft door.
Nos 1 to 19 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TJ03-Aug-72TR 00440 60837
106942911, OSPRINGE STREETC18HouseIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 11 TR 0060 11/169 29.7.50. II GV
C18 house. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 3 dormers. Red brick. Brick stringcourse. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof, the front panel replaced by slates. Glazing bars intact. The ground floor windows have cambered head linings. Porch with Doric columns and pediment. Doorway with rectangular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels. C19 single storey addition at East end (connects also with West wall in No 9). Slate gabled roof. Red brick front. 5 windows; glazing bars intact.
No 1 to l9 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TJ29-Jul-50TR 00413 60841
106943015, OSPRINGE STREETC13BuildingII*The West end of this building is part of the medieval Maison Dieu Hospital, founded in 1230, of which, the main buildings were on the North side of the road. The ground floor of this section of the building is of flints, with a corner post visible. Above it is a timber-framed structure, of which part overhangs on the 1st floor on the West front but part has been rebuilt in red brick and part is hung with tiles. The East end of the building is C17. All this section is of red brick. Eaves bracket cornice. 1 bay on the 1st floor with a cove beneath it and a sash window, its glazing bars intact. The other windows in the whole building are casement windows. Hipped tiled roof. 2 storeys. 4 windows. Cl3 undercroft.
Nos 1 to l9 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TL29-Jul-50TR 00380 60850
1069431THE MAISON DIEU MUSEUMC13HospitalII*OSPRINGE STREET 1. ll03 (South Side) – No 17 (The Maison Dieu Museum) TR 0060 11/171 29.7.50. II* GV
This building is the most substantial surviving portion of the medieval Maison Dieu Hospital, founded in 1230. It was at one time a public house, but is now scheduled as an Ancient Monument and is used as a small Museum. It is a building with Cl3 base and early C16 timber-framed lst floor overhanging on the protruding ends of the floor joists on both the North and East sides. The North front slopes downhill from East to West. 2 storeys. 2 windows. Ground floor has been rebuilt in red brick on the North front, but on the East front is of flints with 2 narrow windows, medieval. The lst floor has the timbering exposed on the North and East fronts. Casement windows. Hipped tiled roof. Doorway in splayed angle. Chimney breast at the West end of the North front with a blocked arch in it. AM.
Nos 1 to l9 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TL29-Jul-50TR 00362 60855
134386713, OSPRINGE STREETC18House and shopIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 13 TR 0060 11/259 II GV
Formerly 2 C18 cottages with later C19 addition at East end. 1 storey and dormers. 2 windows. Steeply pitched tile roof; rebuilt stacks. Red brick. 3 light house window with frame and altered shop window. Square headed doorways to house and shop; half glazed panelled doors. Addition to East with carriage door and loft door over.
Nos 1 to l9 (odd) form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TL03-Aug-72TR 00390 60847
1343870THE SHIP INNC18Public HouseIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – No 12 (The Ship Inn) TH 0060 11/178 II GV
C18. 2 storeys. 3 windows on lst floor. Tiled roof. Red brick front; red brick eaves cornice. False window in Easternmost bay on lst floor; glazing bars intact in other 1st floor windows and in ground floor window to right hand which has segmental head. 2 windows to left hand on ground floor.
Nos 12 to 18 (even)form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8TL03-Aug-72TR 00401 60863
106943465, OSPRINGE STREETC19BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 65 TR 0060 11/177 II
Early C19. 2 storeys and attic. 4 windows. 2 dormers (1 a twin one). Painted brick. Eaves cornice. Half-hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. 1 curved window on the ground floor. Doorway with pilasters and pediment.
Faversham CPME13 8TN03-Aug-72TR 00218 60885
1320242LION LODGEC18BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 67 (Lion Lodge) TR 0060 11/322 II
C18. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Tiled roof with hip at Western end; brick eaves cornice, contiguous with cornice to No 65. Most of ground floor and upper floor modern tile-hung; ground floor roughcast. Windows in reveals and 3 panes wide flanking 1st floor centre window 4-panes wide. On ground floor curved window with glazing bars intact to left hand and central doorway as in No 65; 6 flush panelled door with top 2 panels cut away and glazed.
Faversham CPME13 8TN03-Aug-72TR 00209 60888
132024550-60, OSPRINGE STREETC19BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (North Side) – Nos 50 to 60 (even) TR 0060 11/181 II
Nos 50 and 52: Early C19. 2 storeys. 1 window bay and 1 door each. Gabled roof Painted brick. Windows 4 panes wide in reveals; painted brick voussoirs. Flights of 6 steps (4 in No 52) flanked by iron handrail lead up to doorway at either end. Round-headed doorways; semi-circular fanlights; doorcases with narrow panelled pilasters with small flat moulded hoods on shaped brackets over; 4 flush panelled door in No 5Nos 54, 56, 58 and 60: Early C19 row of houses. 2 storeys, Nos 54 and 56 with attic storwy. 4 windows. 3 dormers. Yellow brick. Nos 56 and 58 pebble-dashed fronts. Dentilled wooden eaves cornice, Half-hipped tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorways with pilasters, pediment, rectangular fanlights and 6-Panel door in No 60, modern flush type doors in Nos 56 and 58. 1
Faversham CPME13 8TN03-Aug-72TR 00212 60911
10749022 AND 4, WATER LANENATimber-framed BuildingIIWATER LANE, OSPRINGE 1. ll03 (North-West Side) – TR 0060 11/182 Nos 2 & 4 II
Timber-framed cottages, refronted with cement on the ground floor and with weather-boarding above, but preserving the overhang ofthe 1st floor. Tiled roof. Sash windows on the ground floor, their glazing bars intact. Casement windows above. 2 storeys. 2 Windows. Originally part of the same building as no 17 Ospringe Street. Curved 4-central braces behind similar to those on north and east fronts of no 17 Ospringe Street; above these, a row of small 4-centred windows.
Faversham CPME13 8TR03-Aug-72TR 00357 60840
1074903BRIDGE COTTAGEPre C18CottageIIWATER LANE, OSPRINGE 1. 1103 (North-West Side) – Nos 1 & 2 TR 0060 11/294 (Bridge Cottage) II GV
Under same roof span as Tudor Cottage. Cl8 front. 2 storeys, 2 windows. Tiled roof with pentice at south end over left hand door. Red brick front. Ground floor windows with segmental head linings; windows with glazing bars in no 1, 2-light casement windows in no At either end, a small wooden boarded door with flat hood on small shaped brackets over.
Orchard House Nos 1 and 2 (Tudor Cottage) Nos 1 and 2 (Bridge Cottage) and Fern Lodge form a group.
Ospringe CPME13 8TT03-Aug-72TR 00292 60741
1074904FERN LODGEC18HouseIIWATER LANE, OSPRINGE 1. 1103 (North-West Side) – Fern Lodge TR 0060 11/295 II GV
C18 house with early C19 front. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Tiled gabled roof with flanking stacks. Redndered front. Windows in reveals; no glazing bars. Door with 6 fielded panels With semi-circular fanlight over; wooden rustic style porch with tiled gabled roof.
Orchard House Nos 1 and 2 (Tudor Cottage) Nos 1 and 2 (Bridge Cottage) and Fern Lodge form a group.
Ospringe CPME13 8TT03-Aug-72TR 00275 60743
1360991ORCHARD HOUSE TUDOR COTTAGESC15Timber-framed houseIITimber-framed house. 2 storeys. The north half (1 window bay) C15. Ground floor rebuilt in red brick, the 1st floor stuccoed with close-studding and overhanging on a bressummer, but its north front weather-boarded. Brick chimney breast on the north side; also on L-wing of which the ground floor is of stone rubble and the lst weather-boarded. 1 casement window with small square leaded panes on the east front of this half of the building. The south half (2 window bays) comprising Nos 1 and 2 Tudor Cottages is a Cl6 extension. Ground floor now red brick, lst floor has its timber-framing exposed with curved braces and overhangs on moulded bressummer and brackets. Modern windows. Tiled roof to whole.
Orchard House Nos 1 and 2 (Tudor Cottages) Nos 1 and 2 (Bridge Cottage) and Fern Lodge form a group.
Ospringe CPME13 8TT29-Jul-50TR 00297 60748
106943359, OSPRINGE STREETC18BuildingIIOSPRINGE STREET 1. 1103 (South Side) – No 59 TR 0060 11/176 II
C18. 2 storeys and attic. 1 window. 1 dormer. Painted brick. Parapet. Twin window on each floor with cornice over and glazing bars intact. Doorway with pilasters, projecting cornice and door of 6 panels, centre 2 moulded and top 2 cut away and glazed.
Faversham CPME13 8TW03-Aug-72TR 00241 60878
1069231THATCH COTTAGESC16CottageIIOSPRINGE
1446/2/103 WATER LANE 03-AUG-72 (West side) 1 AND 2 THATCH COTTAGES (Formerly listed as: WATER LANE 1 AND 2 THATCHED COTTAGES)
Pair of C16 cottages.
Timber framed and weather boarded cottages with thatched and slated roof. One storey and attic, with 3 gabled semi-dormers in hipped roof, and stacks to north and south ends. Four wooden casement windows, the central of 3 mullioned lights. Boarded door to centre left, and half glazed door to centre, with small fire-light over.
Miller’s House, The Arbory and Nos 1 & 2 Thatch Cottage form a group.
HISTORY The pair of cottages are shown on the 1879 Ordnance survey map but fabric and design would suggest that they date to the C16.
Faversham CPME13 8TY03-Aug-72TR 00202 60632
1069190CARTHOUSE 20 METRES WEST OF QUEEN COURTC18Cart HouseIICarthouse 2/104 20 metres west of 27.8 85 Queen Court
Carthouse. C18.Timber framed and weather boarded with some red brick cladding, and thatched roof. Ten framed bays, one storey and hipped roof. Open arcaded front, with 2 closed bays at either end. Interior: queen strut roof with clasped purlins.
Faversham CPME13 8UA27-Aug-85TR 00110 60477
1069191MONUMENT TO ANDREW LONG, 50 METRES NORTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAULC19MonumentII2/106 Monument to Andrew Long, 50 metres north-east of Church of St. Peter & St. Paul
Funerary monument. Andrew Long, died 1810. Stone, square section, approximately 4 foot height. An urn on moulded plinth standing on square panelled base. Long was the Ordance Storekeeper at Royal Gunpowder Mills at Faversham.
Ospringe CPME13 8UA28-Aug-86TR 00065 60359
1069192MONUMENT TO ANNE CHAPMAN, 40 METRES NORTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAULC19MonumentIIMonument to 2/107 Anne Chapman, 40 metres north- east of Church of St. Peter & St. Paul
Funerary monmument. Anne Chapman, died 1807. Stone.Square base with fluted surrounds to panels, with concave obelisk over, approx. Four feet in height.
Ospringe CPME13 8UA28-Aug-86TR 00056 60347
1074905BARN TO THE NORTH OF QUEEN COURT FARMHOUSENABarnIIAisled barn north of Queen Court Farmhouse and running in an East-West direction. Red brick with weatherboarding with low steeply pitched roof; roof formerly’ thatched, now of corrugated iron.
Queen Court Farmhouse and Outbuildings form a group with the Barns.
Faversham CPME13 8UA29-Nov-71TR 00172 60493
1074906BARN TO THE NORTH WEST OF QUEEN COURT FARMHOUSENABarnIIWATER LANE, OSPRINGE 1. ll03 (South-East Side) – Barn to the north west of Queen Court Farmhouse TR 0060 11/184B 29.11.71 II GV
Aisled barn to north-west of farmhouse, on a north-south axis. Brick and weatherboarding; half-hipped riled roof with projection in centre on west side. 0ueenpost roof.
Queen Court Farmhouse and Outbuildings form a group with the Barns.
Faversham CPME13 8UA29-Nov-71TR 00146 60498
1360992QUEEN COURT FARMHOUSE AND OUTBUILDINGSC15FarmhouseII*WATER LANE, OSPRINGE 1. 1103 (South-East Side) – Queen Court Farmhouse & outbuildings TR 0060 11/184 29.7.50. II* GV
Fine C15 timber-framed house. The original portion is all studded. 2 storeys. 3 windows. Consists of a centre portion and 2 wings which project on the 1st floor on the protruding ends of the floor joists and brackets. Curved braces support the eaves of the centre portion. The It floor windows are original casement windows with small square leaded panes, 2 of them being oriel windows with a cove beneath them. Other windows modern casement windows. Tiled roof. At the south end of. the front one window bay has been added, probably in the C17. This is fronted with red brick now painted white, but the ends of the floor joists project over the ground floor window. Original casement window with small square panes on the 1st floor. Behind the house to the east is a T-Wing in red brink, also added in the Cl7, to which a range of timber-framed outbuildings with brick infilling is attached.
Queen Court Farmhouse and Outbuildings form a group with the Barns.
Faversham CPME13 8UA29-Jul-50TR 00155 60464
1260978LAUREL COTTAGEC16HouseIIFAVERSHAM MUTTON LANE TR 0060 (south side) Ospringe F 96 11/188 (local list) Laurel Cottage Interior Inspected II
House. C16 or earlier, altered and extended early C18 and mid C20. Timber framed and clad with render and applied framing, and extended with hammer dressed stone and painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Three bay framed house in origin, possibly a small Wealden type. Two storeys on plinth with plat band to left end bay (which projects slightly to both front and rear elevations) and with recessed central bay. Hipped roof, stepped up to left, and with rebuilt stacks to left and to end right. Four 2 light wooden casements on first floor and five wooden casements on ground floor of 2, 3, 1 and 3 lights, all mid C20. Central door of 6 panels and garage doors to end left. The ground floor stonework of the end left bay, until recently galleted, may come from the nearby and partly demolished Maison Dieu building, at Ospringe Street, certainly the exposed brick dressing on the plinth, the plat bands on both front and rear elevations suggest a C17 or C18 date for the building of this bay. Interior: full frame visible, of rather slight scantling, but with arched tension bracing to main beams, some alteration of wall plate, probably c,1700. Roof not accessable. Early photographs show arched braced frame exposed to main exterior elevations.
Faversham CPME13 8UH27-Sep-89TR 00316 60600
1325225EWELL FARMHOUSEC14FarmhouseII*Dovecot. Dated 1823. Chequered red and blue brick and plain tiled roof. Square plan. One storey, hipped roof with lantern, with painted board doors in east and west fronts. Stone plaque over west door with inscription: R.T. 1823Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 8UP24-Jan-67TR 03537 60848
1069146HOMESTALL HOUSEC18HouseII2/102 Homestall House 24.1.67
House. C18 and early C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Amorphous C18 plan fronted with C19 wing. Two storeys and moulded eaves cornice to hipped roof with stacks projecting to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes and central glazing bar sash on first floor, and 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes on ground floor with gauged heads. Central door of 6 moulded panels with semi-circular fanlight and moulded step. Open modillioned pediment on frieze with sheaths of corn, and with attached Doric columns. Interior: early C19 Neo-Classical details, marble fireplaces, ramped stair handrail. Earlier C18 wings with some exposed timber joists.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 8UT24-Jan-67TR 03904 60726
1325209BARN AND STABLES 30 METRES SOUTH OF HOMESTALL HOUSEC18BarnII2/103 Barn and stables 30 metres south of 23.9.74. Homestall House
Barn and stables. Early C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick and weather boarding on flint and brick base, with corrugated asbestos roof. Hipped roof with 2 hipped streys. Hipped stable wing to rear right. Interior: 9 bays with aisles, with straight quadrant braces and staggered purlin roof. Stables with 2 loose boxes, groom’s room and loft.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 8UT23-Sep-74TR 03903 60685
1069479MACKNADEC18HouseIICANTERBURY ROAD – 1. l103 Macknade TR 0260 14/144 29.7.50. II
C18 house. 2 storeys and attic. 5 windows. 2 dormers, Red brick. Brick stringcourse. Wooden eaves cornice. Hipped tiled roof, Glazing bars intact. Doorway with engaged Ionic columns, pediment, semi-circular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels.
Faversham CPME13 8XE29-Jul-50TR 02276 60300
1069480OASTS AT MACKNADE FARM TO WEST OF MACKNADE FARM COTTAGESC19Oast HouseIICANTERBURY ROAD – 1. 1103 Oasts at Macknade Farm to West of Macknade Farm Cottages TR 0260 14/218 II GV
Cl9. Cylindrical; brick. Tiled conical roofs. Metal cowls.
Nos 1 and 2 and Oasts at Macknade Farm form a group.
Faversham CPME13 8XE03-Aug-72TR 02313 60235
1240449GAZEBOC19GazeboIIIn the entry for: FAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD F85 (North Side) 12/351 Preston Interior not Inspected Gazebo GV II
The entry shall be amended to read:
F85 FAVERSHAM PRESTON GROVE
12/351 No 41
The following building shall be added to the list;
FAVERSHAM CANTERBURY ROAD TR 0160 (north side) Preston F85 12/351 Gazebo
Gazebo. Probably mid C19. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Octagonal plan. Ground floor consists of octagonal piers supporting upper floor, reached by steps cut into earth bank; the roadside section of the gazebo is supported on a red brick boundary wall. Sashed windows on each roadside facade, that to east with shutters, and boarded door on north east side. Although originally in the grounds of Preston house, last rebuilt 1790 and demolished in the 1930s, this is not probably of that antiquity. A gazebo or similar structure is marked on the 1865 Ordnance Survey map.
Faversham CPME13 8XJ27-Sep-89TR 01486 60574
1344237ORCHARD COTTAGESC19CottageIIASHFORD ROAD 1. ll03 (East side) – Nos 1 & 2 (Orchard Cottages) TR 0160 12/202 II
Early Cl9. 2 storeys. 2 windows on 1st floor. Tiled gabled roofs. Weatherboarded front on rendered brick sleeper wall. 2 light casement windows, 2 on ground floor in No 1. 4 panelled doors. Porches with weatherboarded returns, trellised fronts with ogee heads and slate cabled roofs. 2 parallel ranges.
Faversham CPME13 8XJ03-Aug-72TR 01533 60464
1061015COPTON MANOR FARM STORE AND OASTC19Agricultural BuildingIIC19 lamp-posts outside No 80 [No 695], No 81 [No 693], No 83 [No 691], No 91 [No 689], No 95 [No 687] and South of No 99 [No 685]. Numbers in brackets refer to numbers on lamp-posts. Cast iron, blender columns with bands of necking; moulded base with anthemion motif above. Inverted conical shaped lamp-holder with conical capping.Faversham CPME13 8XL03-Aug-72TR 01481 59452
1116513COPTON WINDMILLC19WindmillIIASHFORD ROAD 1. 1103 (West Side) – Copton Windmill TR 0159 13/203 II
Circa 1830. Tower type. Brick. Cap and sails now missing. Iron water storage tank at summit. Built by a German firm and originally used to pump water.
Faversham CPME13 8XL03-Aug-72TR 01294 59544
1319915148, ASHFORD ROADC19CottageIIThis list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 12/06/2012
ASHFORD ROAD (West Side) No. 148
(Formerly listed as No 7 Ashford Road)
Later C19 cottage adjoining Copton Manor Farm Store to south. 2 storeys: 2 windows. Slate gabled floor. Yellow brick. 2 light casement windows above. A 3 light segmental headed window to right hand below, and to left hand a segmental headed doorway; wooden boarded door in frame.
Faversham CPME13 8XL03-Aug-72TR 01474 59436
1025902BIER HOUSE AT TR 001604C19Bier HouseII2/102 Bier House at TR 001604 3.8.72 (formerly listed under Faversham)
Bier house or mortuary chapel. Mid C19. Flint and dressed stone with plain tiled roof. One storey on plinth with kneelered parapet gable. Re-used medieval slit light in gable over plank and stud door in arched surround. The rear incorporates a contemporary urinal and earth closet under a flat roof. Included for rarity of type.
Ospringe CPME13 8XS03-Aug-72TR 00103 60301
1069193LYCHGATE TO CHURCHYARD, 20 METRES NORTH EAST OF CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAULC19LychgateIILychgate to 2/109 Churchyard, 20 metres north-east of Church of St. Peter & St. Paul
Lychgate. Circa 1860 by E.L. Blackburne. Timber framed on flint and dressed stone base walls, with plain tiled roof and crested ridge tiles. Pierced arch bracing to half-hipped roof. Double gate-way to left, single gateway to right; half-panelled gates with strapwork hinges and latches. Included for group value with Church of St. Peter and St. Paul.
Ospringe CPME13 8XS28-Aug-86TR 00057 60329
1069230STABLES AND COACHHOUSE 20 METRES SOUTH WEST OF THE OLD VICARAGEC17StablesII2/101 Stables and Coach- house 20 metres south- west of The old Vicarage
Stables and Coachhouse. C17 stable with C18 coachhouse and extra stabling. Timber framed and weatherboarded with plain tiled roof. One storey and hipped roof. Entrance to rear. Interior: stables with brick drained floors, loose boxes, feeding mangers. Clasped purlin roof.
Ospringe CPME13 8XS28-Aug-86TR 00065 60178
1343988CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAULC13ChurchII*2/105 Church of St. Peter and St. Paul (formerly listed 29.7.50 under Faversham)
Parish Church. Circa 1200, with C14 chapel and C15 fenest- ration rebuilt and restored 1858-70 by E.L. Blackburne. Flint with plain tiled roof. South chapel, nave and aisles, north- west tower and north porch. Tower and integral north porch, with stair turret joining the 2 all built 1866. Saddle backed tower in 3 stages with clasping buttresses and enriched details, particularly around the belfry. North east stair turret, lower stage square, upper stage circular, adjoining porch with Romanesque style doorway of 4 orders with zig-zag and rope moulding and attached shafts. Aisles with battlements and C15 traceried square headed windows. External octagonal vice west of projecting gabled south chapel, with 3 offset buttresses, 2 two-light ogee surround windows with sexfoils in the heads, and chapel east window of 3 reticulated lights. South lancet to chancel, and northdoorway of 3 orders, a roll, zig-zag and billet, with 2 attached shafts. C19 fenestration elsewhere. Interior: Continuous nave and chancel, distinguished only by change in (C19) roof structure. Five bay arcade to south, the eastern-most in the chancel, 4 to the north, the western-most to the tower. Broad chamfered arches on square piers with undercut abaci. Double hollow chamfered arch on octagonal responds with moulded caps from south aisle to chapel, with 1 arch to chancel and 1 to nave. Fittings: chancel, all of circa 1860, altar, brass altar rail, tryptich reredos, choir stalls, organ, polychrome tiles, wall paintings of the 4 Evangelists on east wall, painted black arcading, screen to chapel. Ogee chamfered piscina in south chapel, with corbelled niches with crocketted ogee heads either side of east window, and 2 C19 crocketted and ogee wall recesses. North aisle with doorways to rood stair, and re-sited deeply moulded trefoil headed piscina in south aisle. C12 Bethersden marble font with arcading of 5 shallow arches on each face, on 5 shafts with water holding bases. Pulpit, 1894, octagonal of stone, with heavy stiff leaf and surface ornament, open arcaded sides, and attached shafts of various coloured stones. Box pews. Stained glass: by Thomas Willement in chancel (1852-4) south aisle (1851) south chapel 1858-9, and Clayton Bell (south chapel 1865, nave n.d., south aisle 1871, 1874, and 1885). Monuments: Chancel south wall, wall plaque to Robert Streynsham mid 1630’s . Black and white marble, with Latin inscription on plaque and architectural surround of Corinthian columns, cornice and frieze with scrolled cartouche over. Standing monument on north wall to Jacob Master, gent., died 1631, atributed to Edward Marshall (B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 410). Shrouded, bearded old man on coved and gadrooned sarcophagus with swags to left and right. Semi-circular arched plaque with cofferred soffit, and supports left and right with strapwork and putti. Latin text on plaque, with angel head and shallow relief and painted ribbons and symbols of death and burial achievement over. South chapel wall plaque, Arthur Whatman, died 1678. Black and white marble plaque on moulded base with heavily foliated scrolls and swag, and triple recessed scrolled surround with drapes and fruit, cornice and raised frieze. (See B.0.E. Kent II 1983, 409-10; see also Faversham Papers, No. 15, 1978.)
Ospringe CPME13 8XS29-Jul-50TR 00028 60311
1343989MONUMENT TO CATHERINE CHICHESTER 30 METRES WEST OF ST PETER AND ST PAULC18MonumentIIMonument to 2/108 Catherine Chichester 30 metres west of St. Peter & St. Paul
Funerary monument. c1800. Catherine Chichester(?) . Stone and artificial stone. Plinth, pedestal, obelisk with inscription on east panel, surmounted by cornice with a draped urn on the top. Six feet high in total, surrounded by iron railed enclosure.
Ospringe CPME13 8XS28-Aug-86TQ 99990 60333
1354736THE OLD VICARAGEC15VicarageII*2/100 The Old Vicarage 3.8.72 (formerly listed under Faversham) II*
Hall house, now house. C15 with C17 and C18 additions. Timber framed and clad and extended with painted brick and mathematical tile with plain tiled roof. Irregular plan with 3 projecting wings that to centre left possibly an original porch. Two storeys and hipped roof with stacks to left, centre and end right. Irregular fenestration of glazing bar sashes. Recessed C18 wing to left of 3 storeys, roof hipped, with stacks to left, no fenestration on entrance front. Entrance in re-entrant angle of 2 wings; half-glazed door with sidelight in porch of 3 Doric columns. One storey extension to right. Interior: smoke blackened roof timbers; visible heavy frame. C17 rear wing with newel stair, and windbraced clasped purlin roof. Early C18 stair inserted, turned balusters with ramped and moulded handrail. Foliated and bracketted open string. Three flights around an open well. Sash window lighting stairwell with tracery in form of heraldic sheild. Many contemporary hinged doors and metal casements.
Ospringe CPME13 8XS03-Aug-72TR 00089 60190
1031805BROGDALE FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseII5/89 Brogdale Farmhouse
4.5.70 (formerly listed under Faversham)
House. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic, with brick cornice to hipped roof with 2 raking dormers and stacks to rear left and rear right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor, all with segmental heads, and canted bay window to end left. Door of 6 panels and traceried semi-circular fanlight under an open pediment on pilasters.
Ospringe CPME13 8XZ04-May-70TR 00648 59666
1086971No name for this EntryC19HouseII6/29 No 239 (Formerly 24. 1. 67 Listed as Boughton GV House) II
House. Early C19. Painted brick and slate roof. Two storeys and basement with rusticated quoins, modillion eaves cornice and parapet to hipped roof with stacks to left and right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor, all with painted gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with rectangular traceried fanlight in Doric porch with flight of 5 steps.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AB24-Jan-67TR 05420 59550
1107168STABLES 15 METRES NORTH OF VINE COTTAGEC18StablesII6/88 Stables 15 metres north of Vine Cottage
Stables. Circa 1700. Timber framed and weather boarded with thatched roof. One storey on flint and brick plinth with hipped roof. Two wooden casements and boarded door to left and half-door to right. Interior: clasped purlin roof; stalls survive. Included for group value with Vine Cottage.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AB21-May-86TR 05456 59604
1344003VINE COTTAGEC16HouseII6/87 Vine Cottage (formerly listed as No. 266 24.1.67 (Vine Farm) Boughton Street)
House. Mid C16 and refaced C18. Timber framed and faced with painted brick, with some exposed close studded frame on left return. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement with plinth, hipped roof with gablets, and stacks to centre right and projecting at end left. Six metal casements on first floor, and irregular fenestration of metal casements on ground floor with canted bay taken down to basement level at left. Door of 6 panels to left with flat hood on brackets.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AB24-Jan-67TR 05443 59586
1069159No name for this EntryC17HouseII6/31 No. 260
House. Late C17. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on stepped plinth, with stack at end left. Regular fenestration of 2 three light wooden casements on each floor, those on ground floor with cornice strips over. Central boarded door at head of 4 steps.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AD21-May-86TR 05488 59538
1335915258 The StreetC18Former Public HouseII6/32 No. 258 8.8.85 GV II
Public house, now house. 1766. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and brick corbelled eaves, with stacks at left and right ends. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 canted bays on ground floor with central half-glazed door in fluted pilaster surround with flat hood. Formerly the Dolphin Inn and dated 1766 on the brickwork. (See Faversham Papers No. 22).
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AD08-Aug-85TR 05495 59536
1344013PILGRIMSC17HouseII6/30 No. 262 (Pilgrims)
House. C17. Timber framed and rendered with concrete roof tiles. Two storeys on plinth and hipped roof with stacks to right and to rear end left. Three wooden casements on first floor and 4 on ground floor. Boarded door on left return. Included for group value.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AD21-May-86TR 05481 59543
1069128BRAMBLE HALLC16HouseII6/58 Bramble Hall
House. C16 and C18. Timber framed, exposed with plaster infill on painted brick base and extended with red brick. Plain tiled roof. Hall and cross- wing to left with C18 cross-wing to right. Two storeys with projecting and overhanging gabled wing left, and projecting gabled wing to right. Roof hipped to left with stacks to rear left and projecting front right. Irregular fenestration of 3 wooden casements on each floor and half-doors to centre right. Left return: ornamental ogee and diamond bracing and close-studding.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AE24-Jan-67TR 05518 59119
1069160No name for this EntryC18HouseIINo 248 (Formerly listed 6/33 as Prospect House) 24. 1. 67 GV II
House. C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick on the ground floor, and wood block in imitation of masonry on first floor. Plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges, the rear weather boarded. Two storeys and attic on plinth with projecting modillion eaves cornice to half hipped roof, with 2 flat dormers and large central stack. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes with blind hoods on first floor, 2 canted bays on ground floor, and central half glazed door with fluted pilaster surround, the cornice of the bays carried over the door to form a deep and wide porch.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AH24-Jan-67TR 05534 59504
1069162THE GEORGE INNC19Public HouseII6/41 The George Inn
Public House. Early C19. Red brick and slate roof Two storeys and basement with projecting and moulded eaves. Stacks at left and right ends. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, the outer two with cast iron window boxes, and 1 glazing bar sash to right and 1 3 light mullioned window to left on ground floor, both with painted gauged heads. Central half glazed door at heed of 3 steps with pilaster surround and flat hood. Base- ment opening to right with painted gauged head. Wrought iron Inn sign bracket.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL21-May-86TR 05760 59422
1069163184, BOUGHTON STREETC16House and shopII6/43 No. 184. GV II
House and shop. C16 altered C18 and C20. Timber framed and clad with mathematical tile, and rendered and weather boarded on return elevations. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and garret with continuous jetty and box eaves. Stack to rear. Three wooden casements on first floor, C20 glazed shop front on ground floor with central glazed door.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL21-May-86TR 05788 59421
1096845No name for this EntryC18HouseIINo 214 (Formerly listed 6/38 as ‘Apsley House’) 24.1.67 GV II
House. c1800. Timber framed and weather boarded cut in imitation of ashlar. Two storeys and basement on rendered base with moulded wooden eaves to hipped roof with stacks to right, left and rear left. Regular fenestration of 3 sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor, all with moulded surround, those on ground floor with cornices. Central door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, in Doric porch with flight of 6 steps.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL24-Jan-67TR 05692 59445
1096854186 AND 188, BOUGHTON STREETC19HouseII6/42 Nos. 186 and 188 24.1.67 GV II
House pair. Early C19. Red brick and mathematical tiles, partly repaired with yellow mathematical tile. Slate roof. Two storeys on plinth with moulded wooden eaves cornice to hipped roof with stack to rear left. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes with blind hoods on first floor and 2 sashes on ground floor, all with painted heads. Two doors of 6 moulded panels in central double doorcase, with margin light sidelights, rectangular fanlights and cornice hood on Ionic columns, with irregular array of attached columns and pilasters to door surrounds.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL24-Jan-67TR 05774 59421
1334368THE MANSE AND MANSE COTTAGEC16HouseII6/40 Nos.192 and 194 (The Manse and Manse Cottage )
House, now house pair. C16 and refronted early C19. Timber framed and clad with rendered brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on basement, with moulded wooden eaves to hipped roof with gablets, central hipped dormer and stacks to centre left, end right and rear end right. Four glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 canted bay windows on ground floor with glazing bar sash to right, and basement opening at bottom right. Door of 6 panels, the top 2 glazed, to centre left with flat hood on brackets, and boarded door to right with elliptical fan light and keyed head on imposts. At some time a Public House called the Shoemakers Arms (see Faversham Papers No.22).
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL21-May-86TR 05748 59422
1343976204-212C19CottageII6/39 Nos. 204-212 (even) 10.1.84.
Cottage row and shop. Circa 1800. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two storeys with box eaves to hipped roof with 4 brick stacks behind ridge. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes to left and 2 sashes to right on first floor, and 3 glazing bar sashes, 1 sash, and 1 canted shop window with panelled and half-glazed doors to either side all under flat hood on cast iron brackets. Three panelled doors to left, at end left with open pediment, to centre left and centre with flat hoods.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AL10-Jan-84TR 05711 59439
1069167118 AND 120, BOUGHTON STREETC18HouseIINos. 118 and 120 7/50 II GV
House pair. C18 exterior. Timber framed and clad with rendered red and blue chequered brick exposed on right return and weather boarded on left return. Plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys on plinth with projecting cornice and parapet to roof hipped to left, with stacks to left and projecting and offset at end right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 3 bow windows on ground floor, the central larger. Boarded door to right and glazed door to left, both with sidelights.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AP21-May-86TR 06074 59324
1069189GROVE COURT WITH ATTACHED GARDEN WALLS TO LEFT AND RIGHTC18HouseIITR 0659-0759 BOUGHTON BOUGHTON STREET (South side) No 75 (formerly listed 7/4 as Walnut Tree House) 24.1.67 and 77. GV II House pair. Early C18 extended C19. Painted brick and plain tiled roof Two storeys on plinth with corbelled brick eaves and hipped roof with stacks to centre right and end left. End left bay a later addition with 1 glazing bar sash on each floor. Original house with regular fenestration of 1 glazing bar sash and 1 sash on first floor and central panel, and 2 glazing bar sashes on ground floor. All windows have rubbed and gauged keyed heads, on ground floor carrying a cornice. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels, the top 2 now glazed, with flat hood on brackets. Recessed C19/C20 wing to right.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AP24-Jan-67TR 06122 59268
1104884108 AND 110C18HouseII7/51 Nos. 108 and 110
House pair. Early C18 in 2 builds. Chequered red and blue brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with discontinuous plat band and modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof with stack to centre right. Four wooden casements on first floor and 3 on ground floor. Boarded doors to left and to centre right with flat hoods on brackets.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AP21-May-86TR 06127 59300
1344008127-133, BOUGHTON STREETC17HouseII1607/6/11 BOUGHTON STREET 21-MAY-86 BOUGHTON STREET (South side) 127-133 (Formerly listed as: BOUGHTON STREET 129 Kentfield House)
Three residential properties, originally two houses, later one house and two houses with shops on the ground floor. Nos. 129, 131 and 133 have an early C17 core with C18 additions, refronted in the early C19 and with late C19 shopfront. No. 127 is of early C19 date.
MATERIALS: Painted brick to principal north front. Red brick in flemish bond to the south side of Nos. 129, 131 and 133 and weatherboarded attic gables. Tiled roof, hipped to the front range and with half-hipped rear range to Nos. 129, 131 and 133. Tall brick chimneystack between No. 129 and 131.
PLAN: Nos. 129, 131 and 133 were originally one property, the front range probably a three bay lobby entrance house. A parallel range of two storey and attics was added to the south and an attached single-storey outbuilding. In the C19 a shopfront was inserted in the ground floor of No. 131. No. 127 was a later separate building of two storeys and attic and one bay.
EXTERIOR: The north or principal front of Nos. 129, 131 and 133 is labelled “Kentfield House” in a plaque on the first floor of No. 129. There is a moulded brick eaves cornice. No. 129 has an C18 hipped dormer with leaded lights, No. 131 has a large later C19 gabled dormer with sash window with vertical glazing bars and horns. The first floor has three irregularly-spaced early C19 tripartite multipane sash windows. There is a platband between the floors to No. 129 and its ground floor has a mid-C20 canted bay and four-panelled door with flat hood over. No. 131 has a large late C19 shopfront with end pilasters, reeded brackets, fascia and half-glazed door between two shopfronts which have ventilation grilles and stall risers. The ground floor of No. 133 originally had a 12-pane sash but this was replaced by a small C20 shopfront. The south front of Nos. 129, 131 and 133 is of red brick (No. 131 painted) and No. 133 includes some reused C17 bricks. There are three weatherboarded half-hipped gables. No. 131 has two early C19 multipane sash windows and a mid-C19 sash with verticals only. Most of the other windows are casements. Attached between Nos. 129 and 131 is a single-storey brick outbuilding with brick chimneystack.
The north side of No. 127 has a similar moulded eaves cornice. The attic has a hipped dormer with C19 casement. The first floor has a 12-pane sash with horns and the ground floor a cambered opening with C20 sliding casement. To the right side is a flat moulded wooden hood and C20 half-glazed door.
INTERIOR: The front room of No. 131 has a wide fireplace with early C17 brick chimneystack, two axial beams and some exposed floor joists. There is a change of level between the front and back ranges and an early C19 door between the two with marginal glazing. The rear ground floor room has an C18 chimneybreast with cambered head and a timber partition wall with brick infill. The first floor front bedroom to No. 131 has C17 crossbeams, early C19 fireplace with moulded shelf and two plank cupboard doors on either side of the chimney. The front bedroom to No. 133 has a two panelled cupboard door with L-hinges. The rear bedroom to No. 131 has a moulded cornice, C18 wooden fireplace with eared architrave and late C19 glazed tiles, two two-panelled cupboard doors with L-hinges and a two-panelled door. A further bedroom has an upended chamfered C17 ceiling beam and in the bathroom an C18 partition wall is visible. A half-winder staircase leads to the attic but the roof structure has been plastered over. There is a flying freehold between Nos. 129 and 131.
HISTORY: The front range of Nos. 129, 131 and 133 is under one hipped roof and therefore likely to have been one property originally. An internal inspection has revealed a C17 core. The rear range was added in the C18. The building was refronted in the early C19 and although the plaque with the name “Kentfield House” is on the first floor of No. 129 all these properties may have been known by this name at one time. A shopfront was inserted into No. 131 in 1896 and No. 129 was in use as a post office. On the 1872 Ordnance survey map Nos. 127, 129, 131 and 133 are shown as separate properties. No. 127 appears to have been built adjoining in the early C19 at about the time that the front range of Nos. 129-133 was refronted.
151 The Street
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9AW21-May-86TR 05822 59385
106916882, 84, 86 AND 88C18HouseII7/52 Nos. 82,84,86 and 88 14.12.77 GV II
Four houses. Dated 1720. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with discontinuous plat band and moulded brick eaves cornice to hipped roof with flush skylight to left and stacks. to centre left and projecting at end left and end right. Four casements on each floor, those on ground floor with segmental heads. Doors of 6 panels to left and 4 panels to. right. Central blank window panel on first floor and below it a date stone inscribed: IS 1720.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BE14-Dec-77TR 06203 59279
106918563A AND 67, THE STREET, BOUGHTONC16HouseIIBOUGHTON STREET (South side), Nos. 63a and 67
(Formerly listed as No. 67.
Previously listed as Nos. 63A, 65, and 67)
House. C16 and extended C18. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill, extended with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth, originally jettied to left, with hipped roof to left and stacks to left and projecting at end right. One glazing bar sash and 3 leaded and framed lights on first floor, and 1 sash and 2 framed lights on ground floor, with ribbed door at end right in four centred arched surround, and half glazed door in extension at end left.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BE24-Jan-67TR 06221 59248
106918669, BOUGHTON STREETC18HouseIIBOUGHTON BOUGHTON STREET TR 0659-0759 (South side)
7/2 No. 69 24.1.67 GV II
House. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and stack at end right. Two glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Central half-glazed door with flat hood on brackets.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BE24-Jan-67TR 06212 59252
106918771 AND 73Pre C18HouseIIBOUGHTON BOUGHTON STREET TR 0659-0759 (South side)
7/3 Nos 71 and 73 24.1.67 (Only 71 formerly GV II listed)
House C18 extension. Painted brick and Dlain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement on plinth, the end right bav recessed. with moulded wooden eaves cornice to hipped roof with stacks at end right and to centre. Four wooden casements on first floor. and 2 canted bays on ground floor carried down to basement, with segmental- head wooden casement to right, Half glazed door to left at head of flight of 5 steps, and half-glazed door inserted into right hand bay window.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BE24-Jan-67TR 06205 59249
106918875 The StreetC18HouseIIHouse C18 extension. Painted brick and Dlain tiled roof. Two storeys and basement on plinth, the end right bav recessed. with moulded wooden eaves cornice to hipped roof with stacks at end right and to centre. Four wooden casements on first floor. and 2 canted bays on ground floor carried down to basement, with segmental- head wooden casement to right, Half glazed door to left at head of flight of 5 steps, and half-glazed door inserted into right hand bay window.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BE24-Jan-67TR 06183 59258
1069150WALL AND RAILINGS NORTH AND EAST OF CHESTNUT HOUSEC19WallII7/7 Wall and railings north and east of Chestnut House GV II
Wall and railings. Early C19. Wall, part rebuilt, in red brick, about 8 feet high, approximately 20 metres and returned down Colonel’s Lane. Buttressed and with gate piers with ball finials. Hooped railings approximately 30 metres in length join with another section of wall to west, about 10 metres long.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG21-May-86TR 06045 59303
1069164SCARBUTTSC18HouseII6/45 No. 142 (Scarbutts) 24.1.67 GV II
House. C18. For Mr. Terry Marsh, died 1789. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof, 3 flat roofed dormers and stacks to left and right behind ridge, with C20 flue to front centre. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor, with gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with traceried semi-circular fanlight under open pediment on engaged Tuscan columns. Canted bay windows on left and right return fronts. (See Hasted, VII, 3).
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG24-Jan-67TR 05967 59368
1069165RAILINGS 5 METRES TO SOUTH OF SCARBUTTSC18RailingsII6/46 Railings 5 metres to south of Scarbutts
Railings. C18. Cast iron. Spearhead pattern, approx 3 feet high and extending approx 40 yards along pavement to south of No. 142 (Scarbutts). Included for group value with scarbutts.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG21-May-86TR 05960 59358
1069166128 AND 130C16HouseIIRailings. C18. Cast iron. Spearhead pattern, approx 3 feet high and extending approx 40 yards along pavement to south of No. 142 (Scarbutts). Included for group value with scarbutts.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG21-May-86TR 06031 59340
1104875MORTUARY CHAPEL OR BIER HOUSE BELOW CHAPELC18ChapelII7/49 Mortuary chapel or bier house below Chapel
Mortuary chapel or bier house now disused. C18. Red brick. Set into the embankment of a raised roadway. Front elevation approximately 6 feet wide and 6 feet high, with central boarded door in semi-circular arched and keyed surround on imposts. Interior: wooden shelving for coffins.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG21-May-86TR 06054 59327
1326680132 AND 134C18HouseII7/47 Nos 132 and 134
House pair. C18. Rendered with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and moulded eaves cornice to half-hipped roof with central stack. Glazing bar sash to left, sash to right on first floor, and 2 segmental headed glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Three boarded doors, that to left disused, the other 2 with flat hoods on brackets, that to right in part shared with Nos. 128 + 130 (see 128 +130 Boughton Street). Included for group value with Nos. 128-130. –
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG21-May-86TR 06023 59343
1344005CHESTNUT HOUSEC19HouseIIParish Church. 1840.By John Whichcord. Flint with slate roof. Chancel, nave and west tower. Two stage western tower with diagonal buttresses, string course, cornice and parapet. Four centred arched western doorway with label over. Perpendicular style tracery in 3 windows each side of nave. Nave walls buttressed north and south. Advanced and accurate styling for its date. Interior restored late C20. Built after Courtenay riots of 1838 with flints from Canterbury City walls, the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Grouped with the vicarage and the school in a concerted effort to civilize the previously extra parochial and lawless Vill of Dunkirk.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG24-Jan-67TR 06039 59289
134400691 AND 93C18HouseIIBOUGHTON BOUGHTON STREET TR 0659-0759 (South side) Nos 91 and 93 7/8 (Formerly listed as 24.1.67 Chestnut Villas) GV II
House pair. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with corbelled eaves to half-hipped roof with 2 flat roofed dormers and stacks to left, to right and to rear centre. Four shallow 2 storey bow windows with glazing bar sashes. Door of 4 panels to left and right returns, that to left in glazed porch, that to right with flat hood.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BG24-Jan-67TR 06026 59303
1069152WHEELWRIGHT HOUSEC16HouseII6/12 No. 149 (Wheelwright House) 24.1.67
House. C16, refaced C18. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and discontinuous plat band and moulded eaves cornice to roof with stack at end left. Three 3 light wooden casements on first floor, and 1 glazing bar bay window to left on ground floor, and large recessed shallow bay to right. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with flat hood.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH24-Jan-67TR 05780 59395
1069153157 AND 159C18CottageIINos 157 and 159 6/14 (Formerly Listed as 24.1.67 Montrose and Lyndhurst) GV II
Cottage pair. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with moulded eaves cornice to roof with 2 hipped dormers and stacks to left and right and to rear. Two sashes and central glazing bar sash on first floor, 2 glazing bar sashes and central tripartite glazing bar sash on ground floor and 1 glazing bar sash in outshot to left. Half-glazed and panelled door to left with open pediment on Doric pilasters and door of 4 panels to right with flat hood on brackets. Outshots to left and right.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH24-Jan-67TR 05756 59399
1069154OAK LODGEC19HouseII6/15 Oak Lodge (No 161) 24.1.67 GV II
House. Early C19. Yellow mathematical tiles and slate roof. Two storeys with moulded dentilated eaves cornice to hipped roof with stacks to rear left and rear right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor and 2 on ground floor with painted gauged heads. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels with traceried semi-circular fanlight and open pediment on fluted Ionic columns. Left return weather boarded. Hipped rear wing.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH24-Jan-67TR 05735 59402
1087045167 AND 169C17CottageII6/17 Nos. 167 + 169
House and shop. C17 and early C19. Painted brick in English Bond with vertical weatherboarding to left. Plain tiled roof. C17 building with 2 parallel ranges and C19 shop added to left. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded eaves cornice to hipped roof. Two hipped dormers with horizontal sliding sashes, and stacks to left and rear right. Four wooden casements and four C20 metal casements on first floor with early C19 plate glass shop front on whole of ground floor to left except carriage-way at end left. Sash window, plate glass shop windows and recessed door, and boarded door with rectangular fanlight to right, each with flat cornice hoods on scrolls. Interior: preserved early C19 shops.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH21-May-86TR 05695 59417
1344009151 The StreetC18HouseII6/13 No. 151( formerly listed 24.1.67 as Nos. 151, 153, and 155)
House. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded eaves to hipped roof with 1 hipped dormer and stack to rear right. Three wooden casements on first floor and canted bay window to left on ground floor, curved and bowed bay to centre and wooden casement to right. C20 door of 6 raised panels to centre right with open pediment on fluted Doric pilasters.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH24-Jan-67TR 05768 59396
1344010WALL TO WEST AND ADJOINING OAK LODGEC18WallIIHouse. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded eaves to hipped roof with 1 hipped dormer and stack to rear right. Three wooden casements on first floor and canted bay window to left on ground floor, curved and bowed bay to centre and wooden casement to right. C20 door of 6 raised panels to centre right with open pediment on fluted Doric pilasters.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BH21-May-86TR 05718 59418
1069156STYLE HOUSEC16HouseII*6/22 No. 205 27.8.52 (Style House)
House. C16, built for William Rucke, pointmaker, died 1592. Timber framed and exposed close-studding with plaster infill, underbuilt with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bays, that to end right (return to right elevation) a later addition. Two storeys and continuous jetty on brackets with embattled bressummer in several different moulds. Coved eaves to hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre right and projecting at end left and to rear right. Four irregularly sized wooden casements on first floor, and 3 canted bays on ground floor with glazing bar sashes. Four panelled door to centre left, and glazed and frosted door at end right. Interior: carved overmantel with cove and cornice.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BJ27-Aug-52TR 05543 59470
1086952WHITE HORSE INNC16Public HouseII6/34 White Horse Inn
Public House C16. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Fire damaged at time of survey. Originally 4 bays. Two storeys with moulded brick eaves to hipped roof with stacks at end left and set diagonally to centre left and end right. Two tripartite glazing bar sashes to left, the upper storey and roof to right destroyed. C19 mullioned windows to left and to centre left, this in recess with corbelled cornice, and 2 canted bays at right. Half-glazed door to centre left in pilaster surround with flat hood, and partly destroyed doorway to right. Interior: badly damaged frame exposed in right half of building.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BJ21-May-86TR 05568 59479
1087025197 AND 199C19HouseIINo 197 (Formerly listed 6/21 as ‘Bule House’) and 199 24.1.67 II GV
House pair. Early C19. Red brick and slate roof. Three storeys and basement with cornice parapet to hipped roof with central stack. Four 6 paned glazing bar sashes on second floor, 4 eight-paned glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 2 round headed sashes, that to left with glazing bars intact. Doors of 6 moulded panelled doors to left and right in semi-circular headed doorways. All openings With gauged heads.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BJ24-Jan-67TR 05585 59449
1069157SPAR SHOPC15House and shopIIHouse. C16, built for William Rucke, pointmaker, died 1592. Timber framed and exposed close-studding with plaster infill, underbuilt with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bays, that to end right (return to right elevation) a later addition. Two storeys and continuous jetty on brackets with embattled bressummer in several different moulds. Coved eaves to hipped roof with gablets and stacks to centre right and projecting at end left and to rear right. Four irregularly sized wooden casements on first floor, and 3 canted bays on ground floor with glazing bar sashes. Four panelled door to centre left, and glazed and frosted door at end right. Interior: carved overmantel with cove and cornice.Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL24-Jan-67TR 05491 59516
1069158233, 235 AND 237, BOUGHTON STREETC17CottageII6/28 Nos. 233, 235 and 237
Cottage row. C17. Timber framed, clad with painted brick and weather- boarded on right return. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with stepped and discontinuous plat band and dogtooth cornice to hipped roof with stacks to left and right. Four sashes on first floor and 3 glazing bar sashes and 1 sash to right on ground floor, all with segmental heads. Two half-glazed doors to left and 1 to right.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL21-May-86TR 05450 59545
1087013No name for this EntryC16HouseIINo. 213 6/25 24.1.67 GV II
House-C16. Timber framed, exposed with plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Three framed bays. Two storeys and basement with continuous jetty on brackets and hipped roof with stack to rear right, and return hip of rear wing oversailing ridge to centre right. Three C20 mullioned and transomed oriels on first floor with mullioned sidelights. Three horizontal sliding glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Plank and stud door with mullioned sidelight to centre and ribbed panelled door at end left in outshot. Blocked arched doorway to right. Three basement openings.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL24-Jan-67TR 05478 59520
1087015No name for this EntryC16HouseIINo. 221 6/27 24.1.67 GV II
House. C16. Timber framed, part rendered, part exposed close studding with plaster infill; right return tile hung. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with continuous jetty and hipped roof with stack to right. Two 3 light wooden casements on first floor and 2 glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Two doors of 6 raised and fielded panels to left and to right.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL24-Jan-67TR 05465 59534
1335869TENTERDEN HOUSEC15HouseII6/23 No. 209 (Tenterden House)(formerly 24.1.67 listed as Nos. 207 & 209)
House. C15-C17 with mid C19 fenestration. Timber framed and exposed with colour-washed plaster infill. Plain tiled roof. Four framed bays of 2 different periods of building. Two storeys end attic with continuous jetty, with decorative ogee bracing on the 3 left hand bays and close studding on the right end bay. Hipped roof with 2 hipped dormers and stacks to centre left and projecting at end left. Four sash windows and 1 blocked mullioned window to left on first floor, and 3 canted bay windows on ground floor. Ribbed and studded door to centre left in four centred arched surround with enriched spandrels. Late C20 painted decorative work on the first floor plaster.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL24-Jan-67TR 05506 59494
1344012217 The StreetC18HouseIINo. 217 6/26 II GV
House. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with corbelled brick eaves cornice. Stacks to rear. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 on ground floor with segmental heads. Door of 6 raised and fielded panels to left and flight of 3 steps.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BL21-May-86TR 05472 59529
1069151THE QUEENS HEADC17Public HouseII6/9 The Queens Head
Public House. C17 and early C19. Timber framed and rendered, the right return tile hung. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with parapet to hipped roof with stack projecting to end left. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes on first floor and central panelled door with flat hood on brackets. Single storey hipped and slated extension to right with sash and casement windows, half glazed door and stack at end right.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BQ21-May-86TR 05887 59362
1096861152 AND 154, BOUGHTON STREETC17HouseIIIn the enmtry for
6/44 Nos 154 and 156
The address shall be amended to read
6/44 Nos 152 and 154
6/44 Nos. 154 and 156
House, now 2 houses. C17 and altered mid C19. Timber framed and rendered and clad with yellow stock brick on right return. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with box eaves to half-hipped roof, extended to left and stepped down to right. Stacks to rear left and right. Three glazing bar sashes on first floor. Large canted bay window to left on ground floor and C20 glazed door and window to right with moulded panel below the window. Central door of 10 raised and fielded panels with cornice hood and pilaster surround. Included for group value.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BQ21-May-86TR 05883 59389
1344007119, 121 AND 123C16HouseII6/10 Nos. 119, 121 and 123
Three houses and shops. C16, refaced early C18 and altered early C19. Timber framed and clad with red brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with moulded plat band and moulded wooden eaves to hipped roof with 3 hipped dormers and stack to centre left. Seven glazing bar sashes on first floor and 3 blank recessed panels. Mid C19 plate glass recessed shopfront to left, central mullioned and transomed shop window, and 2 canted bay windows to right, with 6 panelled door to centre, and 2 half- glazed doors to right with flat hoods. This range of fenestration cuts through 2 earlier gauged and keyed window heads and carriage-way arch at end right. Central gauged and keyed wall niche survives. This early C18 gauged and rubbed brickwork (with the plat band) is of very high quality.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9BQ21-May-86TR 05854 59374
1069144CHURCH OF ST BARTHOLOMEW, GOODNESTONEC12ChurchI2/99 Church of St. Bartholomew, 24.1.67 Goodnestone
Parish Church. C12, north porch 1837. Restored 1876 (£400). Flint and plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave with wooden bell turret, north porch. Fine 3 light C15 west window. Lancets in nave and chancel north and south, otherwise C15 Perpendicular windows. Interior: nave with roof of 2 crown posts. C14 chancel arch chamfered into responds. Chancel with braced rafter roof. Fittings: combined piscina/sedile in chancel and piscina in nave. Rood stair in nave. Tomb recess on chancel north wall, cusped segmental arch and panel with encircled quatrefoils. Glass: in east window, and possibly west window by Thomas Willement (dated 1844). (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 334).
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9BZ24-Jan-67TR 04436 61580
1069145CHEST TOMB TO STONE FAMILY ABOUT 5 METRES SOUTH OF CHURCH OF ST BATHOLOMEW, GOODNESTONEC19TombIIParish Church. C12, north porch 1837. Restored 1876 (£400). Flint and plain tiled roof. Chancel, nave with wooden bell turret, north porch. Fine 3 light C15 west window. Lancets in nave and chancel north and south, otherwise C15 Perpendicular windows. Interior: nave with roof of 2 crown posts. C14 chancel arch chamfered into responds. Chancel with braced rafter roof. Fittings: combined piscina/sedile in chancel and piscina in nave. Rood stair in nave. Tomb recess on chancel north wall, cusped segmental arch and panel with encircled quatrefoils. Glass: in east window, and possibly west window by Thomas Willement (dated 1844). (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 334).Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9BZ21-May-86TR 04436 61573
1107863GOODNESTONE COURTC15HouseII*2/98 Goodnestone Court 27.8.52
House. C15. Timber framed and plastered and underbuilt with painted brick with exposed bresummer. Exposed close-studding in gable to left. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth probably originally with continuous jetty. Jettied gable to left, end jettied gable to right. Hipped roof with gablets and stacks to rear left, rear centre and end right. Three wooden casements on first floor, 2 on ground floor with 2 canted bay windows. Left gable has Perpendicular traceried window of 3 lights with 6 over with moulded barge- board. Possibly originally a chapel. Half glazed door with flat hood to centre right. (See B.O.E. Kent II, 1983, 334).
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9BZ27-Aug-52TR 04476 61657
1344024FOUR HORSE SHOES INNC19Public HouseII3/115 Four Horse Shoes Inn
Public House. Circa 1800. Timber framed and clad with painted mathematical tiles, the side elevations plastered. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with parapet to half hipped roof with 2 flat roofed dormers and 2 stacks projecting at end left and 1 projecting at end right. Regular fenestration of 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes and central glazing bar sash on first floor, and 2 tripartite glazing bar sashes with gauged heads on ground floor. Central half-glazed door with pilaster surround. Trap door to cellars to left. Single storey C20 red brick extensions to left and right.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DD21-May-86TR 05020 62030
1069149BRIDGE COTTAGEC17HouseII3/108 No. 3 Bridge 19.8.74 Cottages
House, C17. Pebble dashed with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and roof hipped to right, half-hipped to left with stack to centre left. Two wooden casements on each floor with boarded central door in gabled porch. Single storey extension to right.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DG19-Aug-74TR 05074 62080
1119636BRIDGE COTTAGESC17CottageIIHouse. C17. Timber framed and faced with plaster with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and hipped roof with gablets and central stack. Two wood casements on each floor and central boarded door with gabled hood. Catslide outshot, and 1 storeyed hipped extension to rear left.Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DG21-May-86TR 05055 62078
1119654SANDBANKS FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseIICottage pair. C17. Rendered brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with single storey and half-hipped extension to left. Stacks to left and at end right. Three metal casements on first floor and 2 on ground floor with wooden casement to left and half glazed doors to centre and to left with flat hoods. Included for group value with No. 3.Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DH21-May-86TR 03953 62637
1069147BRIDGE HOUSEC18HouseII3/104 Bridge House
House. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with discontinuous plat band and corbelled eaves to steeply hipped roof with central stack and 2 hipped dormers. Two wooden casements on first floor and 2 canted bay windows with margin light sashes on ground floor. Central boarded door with segment headed surround. Single storey red brick extension to left.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DQ21-May-86TR 05051 62209
1069148POST OFFICEC18HouseII3/106 Post Office GV II
House. C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with discontinuous plat band and brick dogtooth cornice. Roof hipped to left with 2 hipped dormers and stacks to left and projecting at end right. Two wooden casements on first floor and 2 canted hipped bays on ground floor. Central panelled door in segmental headed surround.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DQ21-May-86TR 05043 62188
1069107BARN 30 METRES SOUTH OF MURTON’S FARMHOUSEC17BarnII3/110 Barn 30 metres south of Murton’s Farmhouse
Barn. C17. Timber framed on flint and brick base and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with tiled hipped mid-strey. Interior: 4 bays with aisles and passing shores to arcade posts. Queen strut roof.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DU21-May-86TR 05180 62435
1344023MURTON’S FARMHOUSEC16FarmhouseII3/109 Murton’s Farmhouse
Farmhouse. C16 and C18. Painted brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with plat band and roof with parapet gables and stacks to left and to right. Two metal casements on each floor and central boarded door in brick porch with parapet and four centred arched doorway. Rear wing: timber framed and tile hung with continuous jetty.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DU21-May-86TR 05190 62470
1069143SPARROW COURTC15HouseII2/97 Sparrow Court
House. C15. Timber framed and plastered and part underbuilt with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys with projecting jettied and gabled crosswing to left; hipped roof with gablets and stack to centre left. Three wooden casements on each floor of main range, 1 on each floor of cross wing and boarded door with flat hood to centre right.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DW21-May-86TR 04576 62856
1069108GRAVENEY COURTC15HouseIIBarn. C17. Timber framed on flint and brick base and weather boarded with corrugated iron roof. Hipped roof with tiled hipped mid-strey. Interior: 4 bays with aisles and passing shores to arcade posts. Queen strut roof.Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DZ27-Aug-52TR 05262 62726
1069109HEADSTONE TO THOMAS BARMAN IN THE CHURCHYARD SOUTH EAST OF THE CHURCH OF ALL SAINTSC18HeadstoneII3/114 Headstone to Thomas Barman in the church- yard south east of the Church of All Saints
Headstone. Thomas Barman, died 1758. Stone. Three feet in height with nowy head, with relief of 2 skulls with emblems of death, spades and lilies.
Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DZ21-May-86TR 05267 62662
1069110CHURCH OF ALL SAINTSC12ChurchIHeadstone. Thomas Barman, died 1758. Stone. Three feet in height with nowy head, with relief of 2 skulls with emblems of death, spades and lilies.Graveney with Goodnestone CPME13 9DZ24-Jan-67TR 05269 62682
1069117MEADOW FARMHOUSEC17FarmhouseII3/134 Meadow Farmhouse
Farmhouse. C17. Timber framed and rendered and underbuilt with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and roof half-hipped to right and with hip and gablet to left. Stack to right. Five wooden casements on first floor, and 3 glazing bar sashes on ground floor. Half-hipped porch to right. Hipped wings to rear.
Hernhill CPME13 9EJ21-May-86TR 07436 62678
1121553THE OLD FARMHOUSE LAMBERHURSTC17FarmhouseII3/133 The Old Farmhouse Lamberhurst
Farmhouse. C17. Timber framed and rendered with weather boarding on first floor. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and garret, with buttresses to left and right on box eaves to roof with kneelered parapet gables. Stacks to right, to left, and to end left in single storey extension. Two glazing bar sashes on first floor, 2 French windows on ground floor, with central glazing bar sash. Entry in brick and glazed C20 porch in right return. Two half hipped and tile hung wings to rear. Interior: frame partly visible.
Hernhill CPME13 9EP21-May-86TR 08744 62194
1338179WATERHAM FARMHOUSEC15FarmhouseII3/150 Waterham Farmhouse
House. C15 and C17, extended C19. Timber framed, exposed with plaster infill and tile hung on first floor, and part clad and extended in red brick. Plain tiled roof. Hall house with cross wing and C19 wing at rear. One storey and attic with 2 storeyed cross-wing. Plinth, plat band, continuous jettied wing to right on dragon posts. Hipped roof and projecting returned hip to right. Gabled dormer and central stack with stacks to rear left and rear right. Two mullioned wooden casements to left with basket arched heads and central projecting triangular window, and 1 wooden casement on each floor of cross-wing. Entry by panelled door in rear elevation.
Hernhill CPME13 9EQ24-Jan-67TR 07057 62623
1069155METHODIST CHAPELC19Former ChapelII6/18 Methodist Chapel
16.3.77.
Methodist chapel, now disused, 1844. Red brick with stone dressings and slate roof. Simple rectangular plan with projecting western tower cum entry porch. Tower in 3 stages, with open porch on ground floor having triple moulded arch and ogee surround, large 4 light Decorated style west window with mouchettes and ogee surround, and belfry of smaller section supported by flying buttresses with helm cap. Octagonal buttresses with pinnacles to left and right on tower and on main body of church. Traceried lancets left and right. Side elevations plain with 4 lancet windows, and C20 basement windows. Inscription over west window: Mesley..a..n 1844 Chapel. The chancel was decorated by Dr. Dallinger, preeminent in C19 microscopy, and a lay pre-acher here for 3 years (See Igglesden, vol VI, 18).
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET16-Mar-77TR 05663 59422
1069161No name for this EntryC19House and shopII6/37 No. 234
House and shop. Early C19. Rendered with concrete tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with moulded brick cornice to roof with stacks at end left and end right. Two canted oriel windows on brackets on first floor, with plate- glass shop window to left and sash to right on ground floor, and central moulded and panelled door with broken pediment. Included for group value only.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET21-May-86TR 05606 59466
1334406No name for this EntryC17HouseII6/36 No. 240 GV II
House. C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick on ground floor and weather boarded. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and half-hipped roof with stack to end left. One wooden casement to each floor. Half-glazed door in weather boarded and tiled outshot to right. Included for group value only.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET21-May-86TR 05590 59470
1335850187, 189 AND 191C19HouseII6/19 Nos. 187, 189 and 191
House pair and shop. Early C19. Painted brick with part weather boarded, and slate roof. Two storeys on plinth. The end 2 bays to right (No 191) with quoins, the end bay to left is weather boarded on first floor. Hipped roof with stacks to centre left and rear right. One tripartite sash with moulded and keyed head to left on first floor, and 4 glazing bar sashes. Plate glass shop window to left with helf-glazed door all under 1 fascia, with segmental headed wooden casement to centre, segmental bay with glazing bar sashes to right and doubled wooden casements with boarded door to right, all under single flat hood, and boarded door to centre with flat hood. Garage doors at end left. Included for group value.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET21-May-86TR 05613 59440
1343975242, BOUGHTON STREETC17House and shopII6/35 No. 242
House and shop. C17 and refronted C18. Timber framed and clad with red brick with plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on rendered plinth. Two hipped dormers, that to right rendered over, and stacks to right and to left, the latter with moulded and angled brickwork. Regular fenestration of 2 metal casements on first floor, 1 glazing bar sash to left and 1 shop window to right with keyed and vermiculated lintels. Central half-glazed door with flat hood on brackets.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET21-May-86TR 05583 59472
1344011193 The StreetC18HouseII6/20 No. 193
House. Early C18. Timber framed and clad with mathematical tiles with right return rendered. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic with moulded modillion eaves cornice to half hipped roof. 2 hipped dormers and stacks to rear left and rear right. Regular fenestration of 3 glazing bar sashes on first floor, and 2 canted bay windows with lead tent roofs. Central door of 6 panels with tented hood. Panelled door to end right.
Boughton under Blean CPME13 9ET21-May-86TR 05598 59448
1122677POST OFFICE STORES AND NO 2 POST OFFICE COTTAGESC16CottageII3/135 Post Office Stores and No.2 Post Office Cottages. 4.5.76 II
Cottage row and shop. C16, refaced and extended C17 to C19. Timber framed and clad with red brick, in part English bond, with part exposed frame to rear elevations. Two storeys on plinth with corbelled eaves cornice to roof, hipped to right, with stacks at end left, centre left and right. Three wooden casements on first floor, 1 metal casement to left on ground floor and 2 canted bay windows. Boarded doors to left. and centre. Battlemented single storey shop extension at right. Left: 1 storey and attic extension, hipped roof to left with gabled dormer. Two segment headed wooden casements and central half-doors. Exposed frame to rear elevation. Interior: exposed frame.
Hernhill CPME13 9EX04-May-76TR 07879 61737
1069112ELM TREE COTTAGEC19HouseII3/118 Elm Tree Cottage
House. Early C19. Timber framed and weather boarded with plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with stacks to left and to right. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes on each floor with central 6 panelled door. Catslide outshot to rear.
Hernhill CPME13 9HG21-May-86TR 08060 61404
1069111BUSHEY WILDSC17HouseII3/117 Bushey Wilds
House. Early C17 extended mid C20 to rear. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth, with discontinuous plat band and corbelled brick eaves cornice to hipped roof with central stack. Regular fenestration of 2 glazing bar sashes on. each floor and central panelled door with pedimented hood.
Hernhill CPME13 9HQ21-May-86TR 08009 61372
1069113OAST COTTAGEC16HouseII3/121 Oast Cottage
House. C16 and refaced C17. Timber framed and clad with painted brick. Plain tiled roof. Two storeys on plinth with plat band, 5 pilaster strips, and half-hipped roof. Four wooden casements on each floor. Entry by boarded door in rear elevation.
Hernhill CPME13 9HZ21-May-86TR 05127 60786
1120799FAIRBROOKC19HouseII3/120 Fairbrook
House. Early C19. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and modillion eaves cornice to hipped roof. Truncated stacks at end left and end right, and rear left. Two glazing bar sashes with gauged surrounds on first floor, 1 to left on ground floor and 2 storey canted bay window to right. Central door of 6 raised and fielded panels and rectangular fanlight in moulded surround.
Hernhill CPME13 9HZ21-May-86TR 05024 60695
1344026FAIRBROOK COTTAGEC16HouseII2/119 Fairbrook Cottage
House. C.16. Timber framed and exposed close studding with plaster infill, part weatherboarded and part clad with red brick. Plain tiled roof. Hall house with jettied cross wing. One storey and attic on plinth with 2 storey cross wing, jettied, and returned down left front on dragon posts. Hipped roof with gablets and returned hip and gablet to left. Central stack, the top rebuilt. One wooden casement on each floor to left, and 1 wooden casement to right. Boarded door to left in moulded surround. Interior: inglenooks with well preserved bread oven; newel stair, moulded mantel beams and pargetted walls. Plaster overmantel in upstairs room. Crude C16 work depicting the legend of Diana and Acteion with gadrooned surround.
Hernhill CPME13 9HZ21-May-86TR 04978 60619
1069124WAY STREET FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseII3/152 Wey Street Farmhouse
Farmhouse. Earlv C18 remodelled mid C19. Redbrick and plain tiled roof. Two storeys and attic on plinth with plat band and brick dogtooth eaves cornice to half-hipped roof. Prodecting hipped wing to right. Stacks to end right and to left. and 2 hiooed dormers. Three margin light sashes on first floor. and 2 trioartite sashes on ground floor. Round headed door of 6 panels in large parapeted porch in re-entrant angle to 2 wings. Canted 2 storey bay on left return. Date plaques to centre, obscured, but with early C18 date.
Hernhill CPME13 9JB21-May-86TR 05940 61569
1344025DARGATE HOUSEC19HouseII*3/116 Dargate House
House. Early C19 with late C19 additions to rear. Rendered brick and slate roof. Two storeys and basement with attic. Verandah with tented roof on pierced cast iron piers with side balustrade, on moulded base. Plat band, cornice and parapet to hipped roof with pediment to right, slightly projecting. Stacks to left and right. Segmental headed glazing bar sash in pediment. Five glazing bar sashes on first floor with shutters and 5 margin light French windows on ground floor. Entry by double half-glazed doors in right return with elliptical fanlight, and interrupted pediment. Interior: 3 flight open well staircase with doubled cast iron balustrade on open string. Top lit with elliptical lantern, and plastered anthemion frieze and chandelier boss. Modillion eaves cornices to all rooms and corridors, moulded panelling and dado rails. Marble wood and plaster enriched fire surrounds. One front room with open screen of 2 f1uted Ionic columns in antis.
Hernhill CPME13 9JE24-Jan-67TR 07518 61941
1120781BESSBOROUGH FARMHOUSEC18FarmhouseII3/122 Bessborough Farmhouse 24.1.67 II
Farmhouse. C18. Red brick and plain tiled roof. Two parallel ranges. Two storeys and basement on plinth, with